Latest recipes

How to Make a Bloody Mary

How to Make a Bloody Mary

Can you think of a better way to spend your weekend than with a plate of eggs, a side of hash browns, and a splash of vodka? Neither can we, therefore, we decided to provide you with a step-by-step guide to make your own Bloody Mary.

Along with the mimosa, the Bloody Mary has become a classic staple for any brunch meal. In regards to the Bloody Mary, making your own can be tricky because a lot of restaurants have a signature recipe. Don’t be overwhelmed, though, because this only means you can craft a unique recipe that is 100 percent your own!

The basic list of the things you will need to make a classic Bloody Mary goes as follows: vodka, tomato juice, tabasco sauce, horseradish, Worcestershire sauce, celery salt, ground black pepper, smoked paprika, one lemon, and one lime. The ingredients to make your own Bloody Mary are less complicated than you thought, aren’t they? Depending on how you like your bloody, the measurements of each ingredient may vary. Click here to see measurement suggestions for a basic bloody.

First things first, you need to prepare the glass. To do so, pour some celery salt onto a small plate. Then, rub juice from both the lemon and lime onto the rim of a pint glass. Roll the outer edge of the glass in the salt until it’s completely coated and set it aside.

For the liquid, all you need to do is squeeze one lemon and lime wedge into a shaker. Then, add the rest of the ingredients to the shaker and fill it with ice. Shake and strain the mixture into a glass and garnish it with the celery. Tada! It’s that easy.

This is a list of ingredients and steps that will make the classic bloody, however, there are tons of ways you can spice things up. Go ahead and take a look at our round up of 26 crazy Bloody Mary recipes if you’re feeling inspired. Happy cocktailing!


How to Make a Bloody Mary

A Bloody Mary is a love-it or hate-it kind of cocktail, which makes sense. You generally drink it at brunch, setting yourself up for a totally wired (or very sleepy) afternoon. It is a meal itself, whereas a Mimosa is just kinda. juice with bubbles. Its base is tomato juice, which grown adults have been known to run from in horror. It is pungent as hellfire and sulfuric brimstone, if you make it with plenty of horseradish, Worcestershire, hot sauce, citrus, and other flavorful odds and ends&mdashwhich is to say, if you make it the right way. And making a Bloody Mary the right way is why we're here today.

Now, follow along: This recipe above makes one serving of Bloody Mary (two ounces of vodka, about six ounces of mix). Do you want to make only one Bloody Mary? Probably not, but maybe you're a solo bruncher. However, you can go for the batch by doing some simple arithmetic in the videos below, for example, we doubled the recipe. Then, garnish wherever your salt- and citrus-craving soul takes you: lemon wedges, pepperoncinis, cherry peppers with feta, shrimp, pickled green beans, garlic dill pickle spears, caperberries, and of course, the classic celery stalk. Experiment with gusto.

A Little Background

The Bloody Mary has been called a thing or two over the years. Supposedly, it originated in Paris in the 1920s, when Russians fleeing their civil war brought vodka to the rest of Europe and a bartender mixed it with tomato juice to tempt American expats. It made its way to the States in the next decade, where it was spiced up with new ingredients and dubbed the Red Snapper. Another early name for it was supposedly the Bucket of Blood (spookier, and grosser). Eventually, it became ubiquitous as the Bloody Mary&mdashwhether for Queen Mary Tudor who ordered the bloodshed of Protestants in England, or for a woman named Mary who spilled tomato cocktail on her dress, or for a waiter named Mary who worked at the Bucket of Blood saloon in Chicago, we don't know. What we do know is that back in the day, they weren't topping Bloody Marys with fried chicken carcasses and steak skewers. But hey, things evolve.

If You Like This, Try These

The Bloody Mary is a classic brunch cocktail, and if you're looking to put on a whole brunch spread, you can add a Mimosa or a Bellini. They're lighter, but some folks prefer that. The Michelada is also sometimes considered a brunch drink it's made with beer, Clamato tomato cocktail, and spices, and is a tangier (but less potent) tomato-based drink than the Bloody Mary. A Bloody Maria is a Bloody Mary made with tequila instead of vodka. And finally, there's the Bullshot: a downright weird mix of vodka and Campbell's beef broth. Savory is savory.

What You Need

Here&rsquos what you need to do a Bloody Mary justice, beyond what you might be able to dig out of the fridge or cupboard.


How to Make a Bloody Mary

A Bloody Mary is a love-it or hate-it kind of cocktail, which makes sense. You generally drink it at brunch, setting yourself up for a totally wired (or very sleepy) afternoon. It is a meal itself, whereas a Mimosa is just kinda. juice with bubbles. Its base is tomato juice, which grown adults have been known to run from in horror. It is pungent as hellfire and sulfuric brimstone, if you make it with plenty of horseradish, Worcestershire, hot sauce, citrus, and other flavorful odds and ends&mdashwhich is to say, if you make it the right way. And making a Bloody Mary the right way is why we're here today.

Now, follow along: This recipe above makes one serving of Bloody Mary (two ounces of vodka, about six ounces of mix). Do you want to make only one Bloody Mary? Probably not, but maybe you're a solo bruncher. However, you can go for the batch by doing some simple arithmetic in the videos below, for example, we doubled the recipe. Then, garnish wherever your salt- and citrus-craving soul takes you: lemon wedges, pepperoncinis, cherry peppers with feta, shrimp, pickled green beans, garlic dill pickle spears, caperberries, and of course, the classic celery stalk. Experiment with gusto.

A Little Background

The Bloody Mary has been called a thing or two over the years. Supposedly, it originated in Paris in the 1920s, when Russians fleeing their civil war brought vodka to the rest of Europe and a bartender mixed it with tomato juice to tempt American expats. It made its way to the States in the next decade, where it was spiced up with new ingredients and dubbed the Red Snapper. Another early name for it was supposedly the Bucket of Blood (spookier, and grosser). Eventually, it became ubiquitous as the Bloody Mary&mdashwhether for Queen Mary Tudor who ordered the bloodshed of Protestants in England, or for a woman named Mary who spilled tomato cocktail on her dress, or for a waiter named Mary who worked at the Bucket of Blood saloon in Chicago, we don't know. What we do know is that back in the day, they weren't topping Bloody Marys with fried chicken carcasses and steak skewers. But hey, things evolve.

If You Like This, Try These

The Bloody Mary is a classic brunch cocktail, and if you're looking to put on a whole brunch spread, you can add a Mimosa or a Bellini. They're lighter, but some folks prefer that. The Michelada is also sometimes considered a brunch drink it's made with beer, Clamato tomato cocktail, and spices, and is a tangier (but less potent) tomato-based drink than the Bloody Mary. A Bloody Maria is a Bloody Mary made with tequila instead of vodka. And finally, there's the Bullshot: a downright weird mix of vodka and Campbell's beef broth. Savory is savory.

What You Need

Here&rsquos what you need to do a Bloody Mary justice, beyond what you might be able to dig out of the fridge or cupboard.


How to Make a Bloody Mary

A Bloody Mary is a love-it or hate-it kind of cocktail, which makes sense. You generally drink it at brunch, setting yourself up for a totally wired (or very sleepy) afternoon. It is a meal itself, whereas a Mimosa is just kinda. juice with bubbles. Its base is tomato juice, which grown adults have been known to run from in horror. It is pungent as hellfire and sulfuric brimstone, if you make it with plenty of horseradish, Worcestershire, hot sauce, citrus, and other flavorful odds and ends&mdashwhich is to say, if you make it the right way. And making a Bloody Mary the right way is why we're here today.

Now, follow along: This recipe above makes one serving of Bloody Mary (two ounces of vodka, about six ounces of mix). Do you want to make only one Bloody Mary? Probably not, but maybe you're a solo bruncher. However, you can go for the batch by doing some simple arithmetic in the videos below, for example, we doubled the recipe. Then, garnish wherever your salt- and citrus-craving soul takes you: lemon wedges, pepperoncinis, cherry peppers with feta, shrimp, pickled green beans, garlic dill pickle spears, caperberries, and of course, the classic celery stalk. Experiment with gusto.

A Little Background

The Bloody Mary has been called a thing or two over the years. Supposedly, it originated in Paris in the 1920s, when Russians fleeing their civil war brought vodka to the rest of Europe and a bartender mixed it with tomato juice to tempt American expats. It made its way to the States in the next decade, where it was spiced up with new ingredients and dubbed the Red Snapper. Another early name for it was supposedly the Bucket of Blood (spookier, and grosser). Eventually, it became ubiquitous as the Bloody Mary&mdashwhether for Queen Mary Tudor who ordered the bloodshed of Protestants in England, or for a woman named Mary who spilled tomato cocktail on her dress, or for a waiter named Mary who worked at the Bucket of Blood saloon in Chicago, we don't know. What we do know is that back in the day, they weren't topping Bloody Marys with fried chicken carcasses and steak skewers. But hey, things evolve.

If You Like This, Try These

The Bloody Mary is a classic brunch cocktail, and if you're looking to put on a whole brunch spread, you can add a Mimosa or a Bellini. They're lighter, but some folks prefer that. The Michelada is also sometimes considered a brunch drink it's made with beer, Clamato tomato cocktail, and spices, and is a tangier (but less potent) tomato-based drink than the Bloody Mary. A Bloody Maria is a Bloody Mary made with tequila instead of vodka. And finally, there's the Bullshot: a downright weird mix of vodka and Campbell's beef broth. Savory is savory.

What You Need

Here&rsquos what you need to do a Bloody Mary justice, beyond what you might be able to dig out of the fridge or cupboard.


How to Make a Bloody Mary

A Bloody Mary is a love-it or hate-it kind of cocktail, which makes sense. You generally drink it at brunch, setting yourself up for a totally wired (or very sleepy) afternoon. It is a meal itself, whereas a Mimosa is just kinda. juice with bubbles. Its base is tomato juice, which grown adults have been known to run from in horror. It is pungent as hellfire and sulfuric brimstone, if you make it with plenty of horseradish, Worcestershire, hot sauce, citrus, and other flavorful odds and ends&mdashwhich is to say, if you make it the right way. And making a Bloody Mary the right way is why we're here today.

Now, follow along: This recipe above makes one serving of Bloody Mary (two ounces of vodka, about six ounces of mix). Do you want to make only one Bloody Mary? Probably not, but maybe you're a solo bruncher. However, you can go for the batch by doing some simple arithmetic in the videos below, for example, we doubled the recipe. Then, garnish wherever your salt- and citrus-craving soul takes you: lemon wedges, pepperoncinis, cherry peppers with feta, shrimp, pickled green beans, garlic dill pickle spears, caperberries, and of course, the classic celery stalk. Experiment with gusto.

A Little Background

The Bloody Mary has been called a thing or two over the years. Supposedly, it originated in Paris in the 1920s, when Russians fleeing their civil war brought vodka to the rest of Europe and a bartender mixed it with tomato juice to tempt American expats. It made its way to the States in the next decade, where it was spiced up with new ingredients and dubbed the Red Snapper. Another early name for it was supposedly the Bucket of Blood (spookier, and grosser). Eventually, it became ubiquitous as the Bloody Mary&mdashwhether for Queen Mary Tudor who ordered the bloodshed of Protestants in England, or for a woman named Mary who spilled tomato cocktail on her dress, or for a waiter named Mary who worked at the Bucket of Blood saloon in Chicago, we don't know. What we do know is that back in the day, they weren't topping Bloody Marys with fried chicken carcasses and steak skewers. But hey, things evolve.

If You Like This, Try These

The Bloody Mary is a classic brunch cocktail, and if you're looking to put on a whole brunch spread, you can add a Mimosa or a Bellini. They're lighter, but some folks prefer that. The Michelada is also sometimes considered a brunch drink it's made with beer, Clamato tomato cocktail, and spices, and is a tangier (but less potent) tomato-based drink than the Bloody Mary. A Bloody Maria is a Bloody Mary made with tequila instead of vodka. And finally, there's the Bullshot: a downright weird mix of vodka and Campbell's beef broth. Savory is savory.

What You Need

Here&rsquos what you need to do a Bloody Mary justice, beyond what you might be able to dig out of the fridge or cupboard.


How to Make a Bloody Mary

A Bloody Mary is a love-it or hate-it kind of cocktail, which makes sense. You generally drink it at brunch, setting yourself up for a totally wired (or very sleepy) afternoon. It is a meal itself, whereas a Mimosa is just kinda. juice with bubbles. Its base is tomato juice, which grown adults have been known to run from in horror. It is pungent as hellfire and sulfuric brimstone, if you make it with plenty of horseradish, Worcestershire, hot sauce, citrus, and other flavorful odds and ends&mdashwhich is to say, if you make it the right way. And making a Bloody Mary the right way is why we're here today.

Now, follow along: This recipe above makes one serving of Bloody Mary (two ounces of vodka, about six ounces of mix). Do you want to make only one Bloody Mary? Probably not, but maybe you're a solo bruncher. However, you can go for the batch by doing some simple arithmetic in the videos below, for example, we doubled the recipe. Then, garnish wherever your salt- and citrus-craving soul takes you: lemon wedges, pepperoncinis, cherry peppers with feta, shrimp, pickled green beans, garlic dill pickle spears, caperberries, and of course, the classic celery stalk. Experiment with gusto.

A Little Background

The Bloody Mary has been called a thing or two over the years. Supposedly, it originated in Paris in the 1920s, when Russians fleeing their civil war brought vodka to the rest of Europe and a bartender mixed it with tomato juice to tempt American expats. It made its way to the States in the next decade, where it was spiced up with new ingredients and dubbed the Red Snapper. Another early name for it was supposedly the Bucket of Blood (spookier, and grosser). Eventually, it became ubiquitous as the Bloody Mary&mdashwhether for Queen Mary Tudor who ordered the bloodshed of Protestants in England, or for a woman named Mary who spilled tomato cocktail on her dress, or for a waiter named Mary who worked at the Bucket of Blood saloon in Chicago, we don't know. What we do know is that back in the day, they weren't topping Bloody Marys with fried chicken carcasses and steak skewers. But hey, things evolve.

If You Like This, Try These

The Bloody Mary is a classic brunch cocktail, and if you're looking to put on a whole brunch spread, you can add a Mimosa or a Bellini. They're lighter, but some folks prefer that. The Michelada is also sometimes considered a brunch drink it's made with beer, Clamato tomato cocktail, and spices, and is a tangier (but less potent) tomato-based drink than the Bloody Mary. A Bloody Maria is a Bloody Mary made with tequila instead of vodka. And finally, there's the Bullshot: a downright weird mix of vodka and Campbell's beef broth. Savory is savory.

What You Need

Here&rsquos what you need to do a Bloody Mary justice, beyond what you might be able to dig out of the fridge or cupboard.


How to Make a Bloody Mary

A Bloody Mary is a love-it or hate-it kind of cocktail, which makes sense. You generally drink it at brunch, setting yourself up for a totally wired (or very sleepy) afternoon. It is a meal itself, whereas a Mimosa is just kinda. juice with bubbles. Its base is tomato juice, which grown adults have been known to run from in horror. It is pungent as hellfire and sulfuric brimstone, if you make it with plenty of horseradish, Worcestershire, hot sauce, citrus, and other flavorful odds and ends&mdashwhich is to say, if you make it the right way. And making a Bloody Mary the right way is why we're here today.

Now, follow along: This recipe above makes one serving of Bloody Mary (two ounces of vodka, about six ounces of mix). Do you want to make only one Bloody Mary? Probably not, but maybe you're a solo bruncher. However, you can go for the batch by doing some simple arithmetic in the videos below, for example, we doubled the recipe. Then, garnish wherever your salt- and citrus-craving soul takes you: lemon wedges, pepperoncinis, cherry peppers with feta, shrimp, pickled green beans, garlic dill pickle spears, caperberries, and of course, the classic celery stalk. Experiment with gusto.

A Little Background

The Bloody Mary has been called a thing or two over the years. Supposedly, it originated in Paris in the 1920s, when Russians fleeing their civil war brought vodka to the rest of Europe and a bartender mixed it with tomato juice to tempt American expats. It made its way to the States in the next decade, where it was spiced up with new ingredients and dubbed the Red Snapper. Another early name for it was supposedly the Bucket of Blood (spookier, and grosser). Eventually, it became ubiquitous as the Bloody Mary&mdashwhether for Queen Mary Tudor who ordered the bloodshed of Protestants in England, or for a woman named Mary who spilled tomato cocktail on her dress, or for a waiter named Mary who worked at the Bucket of Blood saloon in Chicago, we don't know. What we do know is that back in the day, they weren't topping Bloody Marys with fried chicken carcasses and steak skewers. But hey, things evolve.

If You Like This, Try These

The Bloody Mary is a classic brunch cocktail, and if you're looking to put on a whole brunch spread, you can add a Mimosa or a Bellini. They're lighter, but some folks prefer that. The Michelada is also sometimes considered a brunch drink it's made with beer, Clamato tomato cocktail, and spices, and is a tangier (but less potent) tomato-based drink than the Bloody Mary. A Bloody Maria is a Bloody Mary made with tequila instead of vodka. And finally, there's the Bullshot: a downright weird mix of vodka and Campbell's beef broth. Savory is savory.

What You Need

Here&rsquos what you need to do a Bloody Mary justice, beyond what you might be able to dig out of the fridge or cupboard.


How to Make a Bloody Mary

A Bloody Mary is a love-it or hate-it kind of cocktail, which makes sense. You generally drink it at brunch, setting yourself up for a totally wired (or very sleepy) afternoon. It is a meal itself, whereas a Mimosa is just kinda. juice with bubbles. Its base is tomato juice, which grown adults have been known to run from in horror. It is pungent as hellfire and sulfuric brimstone, if you make it with plenty of horseradish, Worcestershire, hot sauce, citrus, and other flavorful odds and ends&mdashwhich is to say, if you make it the right way. And making a Bloody Mary the right way is why we're here today.

Now, follow along: This recipe above makes one serving of Bloody Mary (two ounces of vodka, about six ounces of mix). Do you want to make only one Bloody Mary? Probably not, but maybe you're a solo bruncher. However, you can go for the batch by doing some simple arithmetic in the videos below, for example, we doubled the recipe. Then, garnish wherever your salt- and citrus-craving soul takes you: lemon wedges, pepperoncinis, cherry peppers with feta, shrimp, pickled green beans, garlic dill pickle spears, caperberries, and of course, the classic celery stalk. Experiment with gusto.

A Little Background

The Bloody Mary has been called a thing or two over the years. Supposedly, it originated in Paris in the 1920s, when Russians fleeing their civil war brought vodka to the rest of Europe and a bartender mixed it with tomato juice to tempt American expats. It made its way to the States in the next decade, where it was spiced up with new ingredients and dubbed the Red Snapper. Another early name for it was supposedly the Bucket of Blood (spookier, and grosser). Eventually, it became ubiquitous as the Bloody Mary&mdashwhether for Queen Mary Tudor who ordered the bloodshed of Protestants in England, or for a woman named Mary who spilled tomato cocktail on her dress, or for a waiter named Mary who worked at the Bucket of Blood saloon in Chicago, we don't know. What we do know is that back in the day, they weren't topping Bloody Marys with fried chicken carcasses and steak skewers. But hey, things evolve.

If You Like This, Try These

The Bloody Mary is a classic brunch cocktail, and if you're looking to put on a whole brunch spread, you can add a Mimosa or a Bellini. They're lighter, but some folks prefer that. The Michelada is also sometimes considered a brunch drink it's made with beer, Clamato tomato cocktail, and spices, and is a tangier (but less potent) tomato-based drink than the Bloody Mary. A Bloody Maria is a Bloody Mary made with tequila instead of vodka. And finally, there's the Bullshot: a downright weird mix of vodka and Campbell's beef broth. Savory is savory.

What You Need

Here&rsquos what you need to do a Bloody Mary justice, beyond what you might be able to dig out of the fridge or cupboard.


How to Make a Bloody Mary

A Bloody Mary is a love-it or hate-it kind of cocktail, which makes sense. You generally drink it at brunch, setting yourself up for a totally wired (or very sleepy) afternoon. It is a meal itself, whereas a Mimosa is just kinda. juice with bubbles. Its base is tomato juice, which grown adults have been known to run from in horror. It is pungent as hellfire and sulfuric brimstone, if you make it with plenty of horseradish, Worcestershire, hot sauce, citrus, and other flavorful odds and ends&mdashwhich is to say, if you make it the right way. And making a Bloody Mary the right way is why we're here today.

Now, follow along: This recipe above makes one serving of Bloody Mary (two ounces of vodka, about six ounces of mix). Do you want to make only one Bloody Mary? Probably not, but maybe you're a solo bruncher. However, you can go for the batch by doing some simple arithmetic in the videos below, for example, we doubled the recipe. Then, garnish wherever your salt- and citrus-craving soul takes you: lemon wedges, pepperoncinis, cherry peppers with feta, shrimp, pickled green beans, garlic dill pickle spears, caperberries, and of course, the classic celery stalk. Experiment with gusto.

A Little Background

The Bloody Mary has been called a thing or two over the years. Supposedly, it originated in Paris in the 1920s, when Russians fleeing their civil war brought vodka to the rest of Europe and a bartender mixed it with tomato juice to tempt American expats. It made its way to the States in the next decade, where it was spiced up with new ingredients and dubbed the Red Snapper. Another early name for it was supposedly the Bucket of Blood (spookier, and grosser). Eventually, it became ubiquitous as the Bloody Mary&mdashwhether for Queen Mary Tudor who ordered the bloodshed of Protestants in England, or for a woman named Mary who spilled tomato cocktail on her dress, or for a waiter named Mary who worked at the Bucket of Blood saloon in Chicago, we don't know. What we do know is that back in the day, they weren't topping Bloody Marys with fried chicken carcasses and steak skewers. But hey, things evolve.

If You Like This, Try These

The Bloody Mary is a classic brunch cocktail, and if you're looking to put on a whole brunch spread, you can add a Mimosa or a Bellini. They're lighter, but some folks prefer that. The Michelada is also sometimes considered a brunch drink it's made with beer, Clamato tomato cocktail, and spices, and is a tangier (but less potent) tomato-based drink than the Bloody Mary. A Bloody Maria is a Bloody Mary made with tequila instead of vodka. And finally, there's the Bullshot: a downright weird mix of vodka and Campbell's beef broth. Savory is savory.

What You Need

Here&rsquos what you need to do a Bloody Mary justice, beyond what you might be able to dig out of the fridge or cupboard.


How to Make a Bloody Mary

A Bloody Mary is a love-it or hate-it kind of cocktail, which makes sense. You generally drink it at brunch, setting yourself up for a totally wired (or very sleepy) afternoon. It is a meal itself, whereas a Mimosa is just kinda. juice with bubbles. Its base is tomato juice, which grown adults have been known to run from in horror. It is pungent as hellfire and sulfuric brimstone, if you make it with plenty of horseradish, Worcestershire, hot sauce, citrus, and other flavorful odds and ends&mdashwhich is to say, if you make it the right way. And making a Bloody Mary the right way is why we're here today.

Now, follow along: This recipe above makes one serving of Bloody Mary (two ounces of vodka, about six ounces of mix). Do you want to make only one Bloody Mary? Probably not, but maybe you're a solo bruncher. However, you can go for the batch by doing some simple arithmetic in the videos below, for example, we doubled the recipe. Then, garnish wherever your salt- and citrus-craving soul takes you: lemon wedges, pepperoncinis, cherry peppers with feta, shrimp, pickled green beans, garlic dill pickle spears, caperberries, and of course, the classic celery stalk. Experiment with gusto.

A Little Background

The Bloody Mary has been called a thing or two over the years. Supposedly, it originated in Paris in the 1920s, when Russians fleeing their civil war brought vodka to the rest of Europe and a bartender mixed it with tomato juice to tempt American expats. It made its way to the States in the next decade, where it was spiced up with new ingredients and dubbed the Red Snapper. Another early name for it was supposedly the Bucket of Blood (spookier, and grosser). Eventually, it became ubiquitous as the Bloody Mary&mdashwhether for Queen Mary Tudor who ordered the bloodshed of Protestants in England, or for a woman named Mary who spilled tomato cocktail on her dress, or for a waiter named Mary who worked at the Bucket of Blood saloon in Chicago, we don't know. What we do know is that back in the day, they weren't topping Bloody Marys with fried chicken carcasses and steak skewers. But hey, things evolve.

If You Like This, Try These

The Bloody Mary is a classic brunch cocktail, and if you're looking to put on a whole brunch spread, you can add a Mimosa or a Bellini. They're lighter, but some folks prefer that. The Michelada is also sometimes considered a brunch drink it's made with beer, Clamato tomato cocktail, and spices, and is a tangier (but less potent) tomato-based drink than the Bloody Mary. A Bloody Maria is a Bloody Mary made with tequila instead of vodka. And finally, there's the Bullshot: a downright weird mix of vodka and Campbell's beef broth. Savory is savory.

What You Need

Here&rsquos what you need to do a Bloody Mary justice, beyond what you might be able to dig out of the fridge or cupboard.


How to Make a Bloody Mary

A Bloody Mary is a love-it or hate-it kind of cocktail, which makes sense. You generally drink it at brunch, setting yourself up for a totally wired (or very sleepy) afternoon. It is a meal itself, whereas a Mimosa is just kinda. juice with bubbles. Its base is tomato juice, which grown adults have been known to run from in horror. It is pungent as hellfire and sulfuric brimstone, if you make it with plenty of horseradish, Worcestershire, hot sauce, citrus, and other flavorful odds and ends&mdashwhich is to say, if you make it the right way. And making a Bloody Mary the right way is why we're here today.

Now, follow along: This recipe above makes one serving of Bloody Mary (two ounces of vodka, about six ounces of mix). Do you want to make only one Bloody Mary? Probably not, but maybe you're a solo bruncher. However, you can go for the batch by doing some simple arithmetic in the videos below, for example, we doubled the recipe. Then, garnish wherever your salt- and citrus-craving soul takes you: lemon wedges, pepperoncinis, cherry peppers with feta, shrimp, pickled green beans, garlic dill pickle spears, caperberries, and of course, the classic celery stalk. Experiment with gusto.

A Little Background

The Bloody Mary has been called a thing or two over the years. Supposedly, it originated in Paris in the 1920s, when Russians fleeing their civil war brought vodka to the rest of Europe and a bartender mixed it with tomato juice to tempt American expats. It made its way to the States in the next decade, where it was spiced up with new ingredients and dubbed the Red Snapper. Another early name for it was supposedly the Bucket of Blood (spookier, and grosser). Eventually, it became ubiquitous as the Bloody Mary&mdashwhether for Queen Mary Tudor who ordered the bloodshed of Protestants in England, or for a woman named Mary who spilled tomato cocktail on her dress, or for a waiter named Mary who worked at the Bucket of Blood saloon in Chicago, we don't know. What we do know is that back in the day, they weren't topping Bloody Marys with fried chicken carcasses and steak skewers. But hey, things evolve.

If You Like This, Try These

The Bloody Mary is a classic brunch cocktail, and if you're looking to put on a whole brunch spread, you can add a Mimosa or a Bellini. They're lighter, but some folks prefer that. The Michelada is also sometimes considered a brunch drink it's made with beer, Clamato tomato cocktail, and spices, and is a tangier (but less potent) tomato-based drink than the Bloody Mary. A Bloody Maria is a Bloody Mary made with tequila instead of vodka. And finally, there's the Bullshot: a downright weird mix of vodka and Campbell's beef broth. Savory is savory.

What You Need

Here&rsquos what you need to do a Bloody Mary justice, beyond what you might be able to dig out of the fridge or cupboard.


Watch the video: The Best Virgin Bloody Mary Mocktail (December 2021).