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Best Béarnaise Sauce Recipes

Best Béarnaise Sauce Recipes

Here's a burger worthy of any celebration. A double medium grind of three different cuts of beef (plus a little fatback thrown in for good measure) ensures juicy and flavorful patties. And, for that special French touch, a little béarnaise sauce tops it all off.See all beef recipes. Loading... jwembed("video_box_player_inner", "refs=659", {"light":"1","width":"450","height":"338","skin":"player/mayamod.zip"} );

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How to Use Béarnaise Sauce on Practically Everything

If Hollandaise is a classic mother sauce, then Béarnaise is the funky maiden aunt living out a more unconventional existence, entering the room with a near-imperceptible wink and an air of “now what trouble can we get ourselves into?” She finds herself able to adapt to a wide variety of circumstances, like the versatile chameleon she is, from formal English garden party to late-night smoky tapas bar with equal ease.

A cross between Hollandaise and beurre blanc , Sauce Béarnaise is an emulsified egg and butter sauce made tangier and brighter with the addition of shallots, champagne vinegar, and herbs, particularly tarragon, which elevates the je-ne-sais-quoi factor immeasurably. No really, try to describe the flavor of tarragon. “I don’t know what” is about the best way to summarize it. That, and the general feeling it gives of “aren’t I one of the clever people?”

Like Hollandaise, Béarnaise can be made in a blender, or the more-traditional double-boiler method. Swap it in for Hollandaise when you yourself are feeling more unconventional than classic, and check out these preparations when you really want to crank it up to 11.

Steak and Eggs Benedict with Béarnaise Sauce

When you’re feeling so ballsy as to combine Steak and Eggs and Eggs Benedict into one dish, why settle for simple Hollandaise? Go Béarnaise or go home. Get our Steak and Eggs Benedict with Béarnaise Sauce recipe.

Stuffed Eggs Béarnaise

There are deviled eggs, and then there are truly devilish eggs, incorporating all of the show-off elements of Sauce Bearnaise into the yolk stuffing for a potluck dish that says “you’re welcome, minions.” Get the recipe.

Steamed Baby Broccoli With Blender Béarnaise

An unconventional vegetable meets an unconventional sauce for a marriage that just might have a chance of lifelong happiness. Get the recipe.

Sautéed Leeks and Green Apple With Tarragon Béarnaise

Officially replacing avocado toast as the most sophisticated thing you might eat for breakfast. Get the recipe.

French Potato Salad with Béarnaise

Because you were never the kind of person who could be trusted to dress a salad with anything as pedestrian as “salad dressing,” this elegant potato salad incorporates olives and green beans (pardon me, haricots verts ) and binds everything with Béarnaise. Get the recipe.

Cod Gratin with Sauce Béarnaise

Maybe you don’t have the funds to go to Reykjavík to hike glaciers and see the Northern lights this winter, but that’s no reason you shouldn’t try this Iceland-inspired cod gratin dish smothered in Béarnaise for a cozy yet cosmopolitan evening at home. Get the recipe.

Salmon Strudel with Béarnaise Sauce

Why settle for a simple steamed salmon with Hollandaise when you can bring pastry and Béarnaise into the equation? Get the recipe.

Chicken Tchoupitoulas with Béarnaise Sauce

Just because you’re a classic French sauce doesn’t mean you can’t hang with some down-and-dirty Big Easy spicy chicken. Get the recipe.

Chicken Rochambeau

This open-faced chicken sandwich incorporating not one but two sauces, one being Béarnaise, was named after a Revolutionary War general, and we think this dish is every bit worth rising up over. Get the recipe.

Pork Fillet with BBQ Béarnaise

Because when you are already as sassy as Béarnaise, you can justify a little rule-breaking, like adding a bit of barbecue sauce for a tangy, smoky Béarnaise to pair with the other white meat. Get the recipe.

Lobster and Bacon Stuffed Beef Tenderloin with Béarnaise Sauce

Béarnaise: for all of your surf and turf (and bacon) needs. Get the recipe.


Recipe Summary

  • ¼ cup butter
  • 1 teaspoon minced onion
  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
  • 2 egg yolks, beaten
  • 2 tablespoons heavy cream
  • 1 ½ teaspoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon dried tarragon
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh parsley
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 pinch dry mustard
  • 1 pinch cayenne pepper

Place butter in a medium glass bowl, and melt in the microwave, about 30 seconds on High. Whisk in the onion, white wine vinegar, egg yolks, heavy cream and lemon juice. Season with tarragon, parsley, salt, mustard powder and cayenne pepper mix well.

Return to the microwave, and cook for 1 1/2 minutes, or until thickened, stirring until smooth every 20 to 30 seconds.


Challenge

The moment when you think that the bearnaise sauce is coming together nicely and you are in for a treat, all of a sudden it can split in a blink of an eye.

And all you can do is throw the split butter sauce out and start all over again.

But why is it that difficult to make?

Because it takes quite some time and an awful lot of your patience to make that butter melt in the right way at a very specific temperature. Really all I can say is, don’t rush things.


Best Bearnaise Sauce Recipe

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup (180 ml) dry white wine
  • 2 tablespoons tarragon vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped yellow onoin
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon
  • 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 peppercorns, crushed
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1 cup (250 ml) clarified butter
  • freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Method

Step 1

Combine dry white wine, vinegar, onion, tarragon, parsley, and peppercorn in a small saucepan. Boil over medium-high heat until reduced to one-third of the original quantity. Set aside and cool.

Step 2

Mix the egg yolks together in the top of a double boiler, place over gently simmering water, and add the strained vinegar and dry white wine, stirring constantly. Gradually add the clarified butter, stirring until the sauce has the consistency of whipped cream. Season to taste with black pepper.


Combine the wine vinegar, 2tbsp snipped tarragon, the shallot and peppercorns in a small, heavy-based saucepan and reduce by half over a low heat. Set aside to cool.

When the vinegar reduction is cold, add the egg yolks and 3tbsp cold water. Set the pan over a low heat and whisk continuously, making sure that the whisk reaches right down into the bottom of the pan. As you whisk, gently increase the heat the sauce should emulsify slowly and gradually, becoming oily after 8-10 mins. (Do not let it become hotter than 65ºC.)

Turn off the heat and whisk the clarified butter into the sauce, a little at a time.

Season with salt and pepper and pass the sauce through a conical sieve into another pan. Stir in the rest of the tarragon, the chervil and lemon juice. Check the seasoning and serve at once.


Recipe Summary

  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • 2 tablespoons white-wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped shallots
  • 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon freshly chopped tarragon
  • 3 whole black peppercorns
  • 12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter
  • 3 large egg yolks
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt
  • 1/4 cup boiling water
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

Place the white wine, white-wine vinegar, shallots, 2 tablespoons tarragon, and the peppercorns in a small saucepan set over medium-high heat. Bring mixture to a boil, and cook until it is reduced to about 2 tablespoons.

Melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium-low heat. Keep warm until ready to use.

Place egg yolks in a copper or stainless-steel bowl that fits snugly in the top of a medium saucepan. Fill the saucepan with 2 inches of water, and bring to a boil. Whisk the yolks, off the heat, until they become pale. Add wine mixture and salt, and whisk until well combined. Gradually add 1/4 cup boiling water, whisking constantly. Place bowl over the medium saucepan of boiling water reduce heat to lowest setting. Whisking constantly, cook until whisk leaves a trail in the mixture and sauce begins to hold its shape. Remove from heat.

Pour the warm, melted butter into a glass measuring cup. Add to yolk mixture, one drop at a time, whisking constantly. After you have added about a tablespoon of the melted butter, you can begin to add it slightly faster, still whisking constantly. Still, be careful: If the butter is added too quickly, the emulsion will be too thin or will "break" (separate).

Once all of the butter has been added, adjust the seasoning with the lemon juice, and stir in the remaining tarragon. If the bearnaise becomes too thick, you may thin it with a little additional lemon juice or water. If not serving immediately, place pan of sauce over a pot of simmering water that has been removed from heat, or in a warm spot on the stove for up to 1 hour. Alternatively, you may store for up to 3 hours in a clean thermos that has been warmed with hot but not boiling water.


How to Use Béarnaise Sauce on Practically Everything

If Hollandaise is a classic mother sauce, then Béarnaise is the funky maiden aunt living out a more unconventional existence, entering the room with a near-imperceptible wink and an air of “now what trouble can we get ourselves into?” She finds herself able to adapt to a wide variety of circumstances, like the versatile chameleon she is, from formal English garden party to late-night smoky tapas bar with equal ease.

A cross between Hollandaise and beurre blanc , Sauce Béarnaise is an emulsified egg and butter sauce made tangier and brighter with the addition of shallots, champagne vinegar, and herbs, particularly tarragon, which elevates the je-ne-sais-quoi factor immeasurably. No really, try to describe the flavor of tarragon. “I don’t know what” is about the best way to summarize it. That, and the general feeling it gives of “aren’t I one of the clever people?”

Like Hollandaise, Béarnaise can be made in a blender, or the more-traditional double-boiler method. Swap it in for Hollandaise when you yourself are feeling more unconventional than classic, and check out these preparations when you really want to crank it up to 11.

Steak and Eggs Benedict with Béarnaise Sauce

When you’re feeling so ballsy as to combine Steak and Eggs and Eggs Benedict into one dish, why settle for simple Hollandaise? Go Béarnaise or go home. Get our Steak and Eggs Benedict with Béarnaise Sauce recipe.

Stuffed Eggs Béarnaise

There are deviled eggs, and then there are truly devilish eggs, incorporating all of the show-off elements of Sauce Bearnaise into the yolk stuffing for a potluck dish that says “you’re welcome, minions.” Get the recipe.

Steamed Baby Broccoli With Blender Béarnaise

An unconventional vegetable meets an unconventional sauce for a marriage that just might have a chance of lifelong happiness. Get the recipe.

Sautéed Leeks and Green Apple With Tarragon Béarnaise

Officially replacing avocado toast as the most sophisticated thing you might eat for breakfast. Get the recipe.

French Potato Salad with Béarnaise

Because you were never the kind of person who could be trusted to dress a salad with anything as pedestrian as “salad dressing,” this elegant potato salad incorporates olives and green beans (pardon me, haricots verts ) and binds everything with Béarnaise. Get the recipe.

Cod Gratin with Sauce Béarnaise

Maybe you don’t have the funds to go to Reykjavík to hike glaciers and see the Northern lights this winter, but that’s no reason you shouldn’t try this Iceland-inspired cod gratin dish smothered in Béarnaise for a cozy yet cosmopolitan evening at home. Get the recipe.

Salmon Strudel with Béarnaise Sauce

Why settle for a simple steamed salmon with Hollandaise when you can bring pastry and Béarnaise into the equation? Get the recipe.

Chicken Tchoupitoulas with Béarnaise Sauce

Just because you’re a classic French sauce doesn’t mean you can’t hang with some down-and-dirty Big Easy spicy chicken. Get the recipe.

Chicken Rochambeau

This open-faced chicken sandwich incorporating not one but two sauces, one being Béarnaise, was named after a Revolutionary War general, and we think this dish is every bit worth rising up over. Get the recipe.

Pork Fillet with BBQ Béarnaise

Because when you are already as sassy as Béarnaise, you can justify a little rule-breaking, like adding a bit of barbecue sauce for a tangy, smoky Béarnaise to pair with the other white meat. Get the recipe.

Lobster and Bacon Stuffed Beef Tenderloin with Béarnaise Sauce

Béarnaise: for all of your surf and turf (and bacon) needs. Get the recipe.


Reviews

The texture is great, however, the vinegar is so overpowering I couldn't eat more than a bite. If I were to make it again I would probably use a dry wine in place of the vinegar. If you are going to use this recipe and don't want to switch out the vinegar, then use much less otherwise, you're going to be overwhelmed with the bite of vinegar.

A few points. The main difference between this sauce and Hollandaise is the use of vinegar. Using strictly lemon juice would result in a Hollandaise but the vinegar differs just enough to produce a subtle change in flavor. I've made both using various methods and prefer my food processor. Second point. the addition of herbs. I've use dill, tarragon, and even basil. The Bernaise sauce should complement the protein you're using and the sides. Third point. don't stress it even Geoffrey Zakarain uses lemon juice and vinegar. This is a simple and easy sauce with a lot of customization

Turned out just the way I remembered. Ty.

While the addition of lemon juice is a departure from classic bernaise, I enjoyed the brightness that a squeeze added to the final sauce. lighter and brighter. Delicious!

Since when does a Bearnaise include lemon juice? And since when are the shallots sweated in butter? This isn't really a shortcut because there simply is no quick and easy way to a Bearnaise sauce. Thanks, but I'll stick to the original. It's magnificent.

LEMON?? Au contraire. Hollandaise, oui. Bearnaise, non! I guess I can't give it ZERO.

I LOVE béarnaise sauce & this is an excellent recipe for making it. I find it pretty easy--much better than a double boiler method. I just have to make sure I buy fresh tarragon at the farmer's market the week I want to make it. Think I added a bit more extra shallots. Instead of running water until it got hot enough, I boiled it to put in blender [we are in severe drought in LA & should not run cold water to wait for hot]. Also, other pro-tip is that I skipped warming butter in small saucepan & just nuked butter in the glass measuring cup until foamy. Make sure you cover the butter w/ plastic wrap in microwave so it does not explode & poke 3 holes in it. yum!

This recipe is technical, so not really easy in that sense, but it is a simple and delicious sauce to make once you have done it a few times. It tastes great on garlic baked country pork ribs, London broil and asparagus.

This is a GREAT recipe and easy-ish. I'll be making it again. So delicious!

Super easy and very tasty. Add an extra teaspoon or two of lemon juice.

This is amazingly easy and quite good. It dresses up steak, vegetables, and leaves plenty left over for the next morning's Eggs Benedict.

Easy and delicious! I used this alongside pan-seared filet mignon, but I have a lot left over, so I keep finding other things to put it on--eggs, veggies, sandwiches--all delicious!

I made a slightly lighter version, less assaulting on the waist line still delicious http://mycollardgreenz.wordpress.com/2014/07/31/bearnaise-sauce/

Very good on steak. Adds that other dimension. Very good on a lot of things.


How to make béarnaise, the king of steak sauces

Béarnaise falls into the category alongside caviar, truffle oil, and creme fraiche: a rich accompaniment that takes your already rich food and makes it all the richer. Béarnaise is the sauce equivalent of the phrase “go big or go home.” It is gout’s favorite condiment.

Béarnaise is terrific with a filet mignon or sirloin, but where it curls toes is with well-marbled beef. My preferred steak is a ribeye charred to a medium-rare, and I’ve got this habit of saving the crescent-shaped ribeye cap until the end. Then, I slowly savor this last piece of beef, the experience augmented with a gentle dab into this most splendiferous of sauces.

What does it taste like? Well, it’s a butter sauce. Then it gets thickened with egg yolks. And there’s a sharpness from the shallots and white wine vinegar, and a sweet anise warmth from the chopped tarragon. It’s herbaceous, vinegary butter, and it’s a knockout.

There are two resources I turn to for béarnaise. First is the 2017 update to James Peterson’s magnum opus Sauces , one of my favorite cookbooks from last year . It is, dare I say, the definitive recipe (14 steps!) of preparing proper béarnaise. The one problem is it’s rather a pain to make—calling for clarified butter, liquid lecithin, and for best results, cooking the infusion sous vide for an extra hour. This recipe is really meant for professional kitchens or the very advanced home cook, but Peterson is the sauce authority. There are , however, easier methods.

The one I prefer comes from my favorite cookbook , Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s The River Cottage Meat Book . (Just buy the book sight unseen.)