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Eating Yogurt May Lower Your Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke

Eating Yogurt May Lower Your Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke

This fermented food is good for more than just your gut

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Any and all kinds of yogurt could help you avoid heart disease.

During next week’s grocery run, make sure you pick up at least two cups of yogurt — your heart will thank you. A new study published in the American Journal of Hypertension revealed that the sweet snack is good for more than just your gut. Eating at least two servings of yogurt per week was associated with a 20 percent lower risk of heart disease and stroke.

The study analyzed over 740,000 participants with previous high blood pressure diagnoses. They collected questionnaires from participants for over 30 years on their yogurt intake and physician-diagnosed events such as heart attack or stroke.

“We hypothesized that long-term yogurt intake might reduce the risk of cardiovascular problems,” said study author Justin Buendia in a press release, “since some previous small studies had shown beneficial effects of fermented dairy products.”

Other fermented dairy products include kefir, cheese, and sour cream. Kefir is known to be beneficial to skin and gut health, as well, while cheese has been applauded for its high nutrient content.

“Our results provide important new evidence that yogurt may benefit heart health alone or as a consistent part of a diet rich in fiber-rich fruits, vegetables, and whole grains,” said Buendia.

Some yogurts might be better for you than others — but if you can’t splurge for the probiotic-infused fancy stuff, even a generic brand of regular sweetened yogurt could do the trick. These researchers didn’t discriminate between yogurt types, so whether yours is Greek, Icelandic, or regular, it could be doing your heart some good.

The reason yogurt is so good for you is still up in the air, but researchers suspect it has something to do with an improvement in “vascular stiffness.” Vascular stiffness can escalate into more severe conditions, such as clogged arteries or a stall in blood flow to the heart.

So next time you’re deciding on a snack to eat at your desk, consider a cup of yogurt with granola or even fresh fruit — it’s a heart-healthy food you’ll actually want to eat.


New Study: Eating Recommended Servings of Dairy Foods, Especially Yogurt, May Be Linked to Lower Risk of High Blood Pressure in Healthy Adults

Concerned about developing high blood pressure? Good news &ndash a new study showed eating dairy foods, and in particular yogurt, was linked to reduced risk of high blood pressure in healthy adults.

Nearly 75 million Americans have high blood pressure, which increases the chances of having a heart attack or stroke.A new prospective study showed that a common, staple food group may help. The researchers found consuming dairy foods, including milk, cheese and especially yogurt was associated with a lower risk of high blood pressure in adults.

In the study, data from more than 150,000 females in the Nurses&rsquo Health Study (NHS) and Nurses&rsquo Health Study II (NHS II) and over 30,000 males in Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) was analyzed to evaluate the association between total dairy servings and individual dairy foods and the risk of developing high blood pressure. The results showed:

  • Those in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS groups who ate at least three servings of dairy (including milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream and sherbet/frozen yogurt) per day compared to less than a half serving per day had a 13%, 25% and 7% lower risk of high blood pressure, respectively.
  • Regular yogurt consumption (defined as at least five servings per week vs. less than one serving per month) was associated with a 19%, 17%, and 6% lower risk of high blood pressure in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS, respectively.
  • There was an 18% lower risk of high blood pressure with each additional serving of yogurt eaten per day.
  • Subjects who both followed a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style diet and ate at least five servings of yogurt per week had a 30% lower risk of high blood pressure as compared to those who had low yogurt consumption and did not align with the DASH diet.

The results of this study add to the body of research supporting a link between eating dairy foods and a reduced risk of high blood pressure. Additionally, the study provides support for current recommendations in the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Healthy U.S.-Style Eating Pattern for those 9 and older to eat three servings of low-fat and fat-free dairy foods, like milk, cheese and yogurt, per day. Lifestyle choices, including eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight and getting enough physical activity, can help reduce the risk of high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

Click here to learn more about healthy eating patterns and how to build your plate and fill your glass and here for undeniably dairy recipes.


New Study: Eating Recommended Servings of Dairy Foods, Especially Yogurt, May Be Linked to Lower Risk of High Blood Pressure in Healthy Adults

Concerned about developing high blood pressure? Good news &ndash a new study showed eating dairy foods, and in particular yogurt, was linked to reduced risk of high blood pressure in healthy adults.

Nearly 75 million Americans have high blood pressure, which increases the chances of having a heart attack or stroke.A new prospective study showed that a common, staple food group may help. The researchers found consuming dairy foods, including milk, cheese and especially yogurt was associated with a lower risk of high blood pressure in adults.

In the study, data from more than 150,000 females in the Nurses&rsquo Health Study (NHS) and Nurses&rsquo Health Study II (NHS II) and over 30,000 males in Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) was analyzed to evaluate the association between total dairy servings and individual dairy foods and the risk of developing high blood pressure. The results showed:

  • Those in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS groups who ate at least three servings of dairy (including milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream and sherbet/frozen yogurt) per day compared to less than a half serving per day had a 13%, 25% and 7% lower risk of high blood pressure, respectively.
  • Regular yogurt consumption (defined as at least five servings per week vs. less than one serving per month) was associated with a 19%, 17%, and 6% lower risk of high blood pressure in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS, respectively.
  • There was an 18% lower risk of high blood pressure with each additional serving of yogurt eaten per day.
  • Subjects who both followed a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style diet and ate at least five servings of yogurt per week had a 30% lower risk of high blood pressure as compared to those who had low yogurt consumption and did not align with the DASH diet.

The results of this study add to the body of research supporting a link between eating dairy foods and a reduced risk of high blood pressure. Additionally, the study provides support for current recommendations in the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Healthy U.S.-Style Eating Pattern for those 9 and older to eat three servings of low-fat and fat-free dairy foods, like milk, cheese and yogurt, per day. Lifestyle choices, including eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight and getting enough physical activity, can help reduce the risk of high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

Click here to learn more about healthy eating patterns and how to build your plate and fill your glass and here for undeniably dairy recipes.


New Study: Eating Recommended Servings of Dairy Foods, Especially Yogurt, May Be Linked to Lower Risk of High Blood Pressure in Healthy Adults

Concerned about developing high blood pressure? Good news &ndash a new study showed eating dairy foods, and in particular yogurt, was linked to reduced risk of high blood pressure in healthy adults.

Nearly 75 million Americans have high blood pressure, which increases the chances of having a heart attack or stroke.A new prospective study showed that a common, staple food group may help. The researchers found consuming dairy foods, including milk, cheese and especially yogurt was associated with a lower risk of high blood pressure in adults.

In the study, data from more than 150,000 females in the Nurses&rsquo Health Study (NHS) and Nurses&rsquo Health Study II (NHS II) and over 30,000 males in Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) was analyzed to evaluate the association between total dairy servings and individual dairy foods and the risk of developing high blood pressure. The results showed:

  • Those in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS groups who ate at least three servings of dairy (including milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream and sherbet/frozen yogurt) per day compared to less than a half serving per day had a 13%, 25% and 7% lower risk of high blood pressure, respectively.
  • Regular yogurt consumption (defined as at least five servings per week vs. less than one serving per month) was associated with a 19%, 17%, and 6% lower risk of high blood pressure in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS, respectively.
  • There was an 18% lower risk of high blood pressure with each additional serving of yogurt eaten per day.
  • Subjects who both followed a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style diet and ate at least five servings of yogurt per week had a 30% lower risk of high blood pressure as compared to those who had low yogurt consumption and did not align with the DASH diet.

The results of this study add to the body of research supporting a link between eating dairy foods and a reduced risk of high blood pressure. Additionally, the study provides support for current recommendations in the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Healthy U.S.-Style Eating Pattern for those 9 and older to eat three servings of low-fat and fat-free dairy foods, like milk, cheese and yogurt, per day. Lifestyle choices, including eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight and getting enough physical activity, can help reduce the risk of high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

Click here to learn more about healthy eating patterns and how to build your plate and fill your glass and here for undeniably dairy recipes.


New Study: Eating Recommended Servings of Dairy Foods, Especially Yogurt, May Be Linked to Lower Risk of High Blood Pressure in Healthy Adults

Concerned about developing high blood pressure? Good news &ndash a new study showed eating dairy foods, and in particular yogurt, was linked to reduced risk of high blood pressure in healthy adults.

Nearly 75 million Americans have high blood pressure, which increases the chances of having a heart attack or stroke.A new prospective study showed that a common, staple food group may help. The researchers found consuming dairy foods, including milk, cheese and especially yogurt was associated with a lower risk of high blood pressure in adults.

In the study, data from more than 150,000 females in the Nurses&rsquo Health Study (NHS) and Nurses&rsquo Health Study II (NHS II) and over 30,000 males in Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) was analyzed to evaluate the association between total dairy servings and individual dairy foods and the risk of developing high blood pressure. The results showed:

  • Those in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS groups who ate at least three servings of dairy (including milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream and sherbet/frozen yogurt) per day compared to less than a half serving per day had a 13%, 25% and 7% lower risk of high blood pressure, respectively.
  • Regular yogurt consumption (defined as at least five servings per week vs. less than one serving per month) was associated with a 19%, 17%, and 6% lower risk of high blood pressure in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS, respectively.
  • There was an 18% lower risk of high blood pressure with each additional serving of yogurt eaten per day.
  • Subjects who both followed a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style diet and ate at least five servings of yogurt per week had a 30% lower risk of high blood pressure as compared to those who had low yogurt consumption and did not align with the DASH diet.

The results of this study add to the body of research supporting a link between eating dairy foods and a reduced risk of high blood pressure. Additionally, the study provides support for current recommendations in the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Healthy U.S.-Style Eating Pattern for those 9 and older to eat three servings of low-fat and fat-free dairy foods, like milk, cheese and yogurt, per day. Lifestyle choices, including eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight and getting enough physical activity, can help reduce the risk of high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

Click here to learn more about healthy eating patterns and how to build your plate and fill your glass and here for undeniably dairy recipes.


New Study: Eating Recommended Servings of Dairy Foods, Especially Yogurt, May Be Linked to Lower Risk of High Blood Pressure in Healthy Adults

Concerned about developing high blood pressure? Good news &ndash a new study showed eating dairy foods, and in particular yogurt, was linked to reduced risk of high blood pressure in healthy adults.

Nearly 75 million Americans have high blood pressure, which increases the chances of having a heart attack or stroke.A new prospective study showed that a common, staple food group may help. The researchers found consuming dairy foods, including milk, cheese and especially yogurt was associated with a lower risk of high blood pressure in adults.

In the study, data from more than 150,000 females in the Nurses&rsquo Health Study (NHS) and Nurses&rsquo Health Study II (NHS II) and over 30,000 males in Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) was analyzed to evaluate the association between total dairy servings and individual dairy foods and the risk of developing high blood pressure. The results showed:

  • Those in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS groups who ate at least three servings of dairy (including milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream and sherbet/frozen yogurt) per day compared to less than a half serving per day had a 13%, 25% and 7% lower risk of high blood pressure, respectively.
  • Regular yogurt consumption (defined as at least five servings per week vs. less than one serving per month) was associated with a 19%, 17%, and 6% lower risk of high blood pressure in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS, respectively.
  • There was an 18% lower risk of high blood pressure with each additional serving of yogurt eaten per day.
  • Subjects who both followed a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style diet and ate at least five servings of yogurt per week had a 30% lower risk of high blood pressure as compared to those who had low yogurt consumption and did not align with the DASH diet.

The results of this study add to the body of research supporting a link between eating dairy foods and a reduced risk of high blood pressure. Additionally, the study provides support for current recommendations in the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Healthy U.S.-Style Eating Pattern for those 9 and older to eat three servings of low-fat and fat-free dairy foods, like milk, cheese and yogurt, per day. Lifestyle choices, including eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight and getting enough physical activity, can help reduce the risk of high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

Click here to learn more about healthy eating patterns and how to build your plate and fill your glass and here for undeniably dairy recipes.


New Study: Eating Recommended Servings of Dairy Foods, Especially Yogurt, May Be Linked to Lower Risk of High Blood Pressure in Healthy Adults

Concerned about developing high blood pressure? Good news &ndash a new study showed eating dairy foods, and in particular yogurt, was linked to reduced risk of high blood pressure in healthy adults.

Nearly 75 million Americans have high blood pressure, which increases the chances of having a heart attack or stroke.A new prospective study showed that a common, staple food group may help. The researchers found consuming dairy foods, including milk, cheese and especially yogurt was associated with a lower risk of high blood pressure in adults.

In the study, data from more than 150,000 females in the Nurses&rsquo Health Study (NHS) and Nurses&rsquo Health Study II (NHS II) and over 30,000 males in Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) was analyzed to evaluate the association between total dairy servings and individual dairy foods and the risk of developing high blood pressure. The results showed:

  • Those in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS groups who ate at least three servings of dairy (including milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream and sherbet/frozen yogurt) per day compared to less than a half serving per day had a 13%, 25% and 7% lower risk of high blood pressure, respectively.
  • Regular yogurt consumption (defined as at least five servings per week vs. less than one serving per month) was associated with a 19%, 17%, and 6% lower risk of high blood pressure in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS, respectively.
  • There was an 18% lower risk of high blood pressure with each additional serving of yogurt eaten per day.
  • Subjects who both followed a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style diet and ate at least five servings of yogurt per week had a 30% lower risk of high blood pressure as compared to those who had low yogurt consumption and did not align with the DASH diet.

The results of this study add to the body of research supporting a link between eating dairy foods and a reduced risk of high blood pressure. Additionally, the study provides support for current recommendations in the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Healthy U.S.-Style Eating Pattern for those 9 and older to eat three servings of low-fat and fat-free dairy foods, like milk, cheese and yogurt, per day. Lifestyle choices, including eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight and getting enough physical activity, can help reduce the risk of high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

Click here to learn more about healthy eating patterns and how to build your plate and fill your glass and here for undeniably dairy recipes.


New Study: Eating Recommended Servings of Dairy Foods, Especially Yogurt, May Be Linked to Lower Risk of High Blood Pressure in Healthy Adults

Concerned about developing high blood pressure? Good news &ndash a new study showed eating dairy foods, and in particular yogurt, was linked to reduced risk of high blood pressure in healthy adults.

Nearly 75 million Americans have high blood pressure, which increases the chances of having a heart attack or stroke.A new prospective study showed that a common, staple food group may help. The researchers found consuming dairy foods, including milk, cheese and especially yogurt was associated with a lower risk of high blood pressure in adults.

In the study, data from more than 150,000 females in the Nurses&rsquo Health Study (NHS) and Nurses&rsquo Health Study II (NHS II) and over 30,000 males in Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) was analyzed to evaluate the association between total dairy servings and individual dairy foods and the risk of developing high blood pressure. The results showed:

  • Those in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS groups who ate at least three servings of dairy (including milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream and sherbet/frozen yogurt) per day compared to less than a half serving per day had a 13%, 25% and 7% lower risk of high blood pressure, respectively.
  • Regular yogurt consumption (defined as at least five servings per week vs. less than one serving per month) was associated with a 19%, 17%, and 6% lower risk of high blood pressure in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS, respectively.
  • There was an 18% lower risk of high blood pressure with each additional serving of yogurt eaten per day.
  • Subjects who both followed a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style diet and ate at least five servings of yogurt per week had a 30% lower risk of high blood pressure as compared to those who had low yogurt consumption and did not align with the DASH diet.

The results of this study add to the body of research supporting a link between eating dairy foods and a reduced risk of high blood pressure. Additionally, the study provides support for current recommendations in the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Healthy U.S.-Style Eating Pattern for those 9 and older to eat three servings of low-fat and fat-free dairy foods, like milk, cheese and yogurt, per day. Lifestyle choices, including eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight and getting enough physical activity, can help reduce the risk of high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

Click here to learn more about healthy eating patterns and how to build your plate and fill your glass and here for undeniably dairy recipes.


New Study: Eating Recommended Servings of Dairy Foods, Especially Yogurt, May Be Linked to Lower Risk of High Blood Pressure in Healthy Adults

Concerned about developing high blood pressure? Good news &ndash a new study showed eating dairy foods, and in particular yogurt, was linked to reduced risk of high blood pressure in healthy adults.

Nearly 75 million Americans have high blood pressure, which increases the chances of having a heart attack or stroke.A new prospective study showed that a common, staple food group may help. The researchers found consuming dairy foods, including milk, cheese and especially yogurt was associated with a lower risk of high blood pressure in adults.

In the study, data from more than 150,000 females in the Nurses&rsquo Health Study (NHS) and Nurses&rsquo Health Study II (NHS II) and over 30,000 males in Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) was analyzed to evaluate the association between total dairy servings and individual dairy foods and the risk of developing high blood pressure. The results showed:

  • Those in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS groups who ate at least three servings of dairy (including milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream and sherbet/frozen yogurt) per day compared to less than a half serving per day had a 13%, 25% and 7% lower risk of high blood pressure, respectively.
  • Regular yogurt consumption (defined as at least five servings per week vs. less than one serving per month) was associated with a 19%, 17%, and 6% lower risk of high blood pressure in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS, respectively.
  • There was an 18% lower risk of high blood pressure with each additional serving of yogurt eaten per day.
  • Subjects who both followed a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style diet and ate at least five servings of yogurt per week had a 30% lower risk of high blood pressure as compared to those who had low yogurt consumption and did not align with the DASH diet.

The results of this study add to the body of research supporting a link between eating dairy foods and a reduced risk of high blood pressure. Additionally, the study provides support for current recommendations in the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Healthy U.S.-Style Eating Pattern for those 9 and older to eat three servings of low-fat and fat-free dairy foods, like milk, cheese and yogurt, per day. Lifestyle choices, including eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight and getting enough physical activity, can help reduce the risk of high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

Click here to learn more about healthy eating patterns and how to build your plate and fill your glass and here for undeniably dairy recipes.


New Study: Eating Recommended Servings of Dairy Foods, Especially Yogurt, May Be Linked to Lower Risk of High Blood Pressure in Healthy Adults

Concerned about developing high blood pressure? Good news &ndash a new study showed eating dairy foods, and in particular yogurt, was linked to reduced risk of high blood pressure in healthy adults.

Nearly 75 million Americans have high blood pressure, which increases the chances of having a heart attack or stroke.A new prospective study showed that a common, staple food group may help. The researchers found consuming dairy foods, including milk, cheese and especially yogurt was associated with a lower risk of high blood pressure in adults.

In the study, data from more than 150,000 females in the Nurses&rsquo Health Study (NHS) and Nurses&rsquo Health Study II (NHS II) and over 30,000 males in Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) was analyzed to evaluate the association between total dairy servings and individual dairy foods and the risk of developing high blood pressure. The results showed:

  • Those in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS groups who ate at least three servings of dairy (including milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream and sherbet/frozen yogurt) per day compared to less than a half serving per day had a 13%, 25% and 7% lower risk of high blood pressure, respectively.
  • Regular yogurt consumption (defined as at least five servings per week vs. less than one serving per month) was associated with a 19%, 17%, and 6% lower risk of high blood pressure in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS, respectively.
  • There was an 18% lower risk of high blood pressure with each additional serving of yogurt eaten per day.
  • Subjects who both followed a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style diet and ate at least five servings of yogurt per week had a 30% lower risk of high blood pressure as compared to those who had low yogurt consumption and did not align with the DASH diet.

The results of this study add to the body of research supporting a link between eating dairy foods and a reduced risk of high blood pressure. Additionally, the study provides support for current recommendations in the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Healthy U.S.-Style Eating Pattern for those 9 and older to eat three servings of low-fat and fat-free dairy foods, like milk, cheese and yogurt, per day. Lifestyle choices, including eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight and getting enough physical activity, can help reduce the risk of high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

Click here to learn more about healthy eating patterns and how to build your plate and fill your glass and here for undeniably dairy recipes.


New Study: Eating Recommended Servings of Dairy Foods, Especially Yogurt, May Be Linked to Lower Risk of High Blood Pressure in Healthy Adults

Concerned about developing high blood pressure? Good news &ndash a new study showed eating dairy foods, and in particular yogurt, was linked to reduced risk of high blood pressure in healthy adults.

Nearly 75 million Americans have high blood pressure, which increases the chances of having a heart attack or stroke.A new prospective study showed that a common, staple food group may help. The researchers found consuming dairy foods, including milk, cheese and especially yogurt was associated with a lower risk of high blood pressure in adults.

In the study, data from more than 150,000 females in the Nurses&rsquo Health Study (NHS) and Nurses&rsquo Health Study II (NHS II) and over 30,000 males in Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) was analyzed to evaluate the association between total dairy servings and individual dairy foods and the risk of developing high blood pressure. The results showed:

  • Those in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS groups who ate at least three servings of dairy (including milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream and sherbet/frozen yogurt) per day compared to less than a half serving per day had a 13%, 25% and 7% lower risk of high blood pressure, respectively.
  • Regular yogurt consumption (defined as at least five servings per week vs. less than one serving per month) was associated with a 19%, 17%, and 6% lower risk of high blood pressure in the NHS, NHS II and HPFS, respectively.
  • There was an 18% lower risk of high blood pressure with each additional serving of yogurt eaten per day.
  • Subjects who both followed a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style diet and ate at least five servings of yogurt per week had a 30% lower risk of high blood pressure as compared to those who had low yogurt consumption and did not align with the DASH diet.

The results of this study add to the body of research supporting a link between eating dairy foods and a reduced risk of high blood pressure. Additionally, the study provides support for current recommendations in the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Healthy U.S.-Style Eating Pattern for those 9 and older to eat three servings of low-fat and fat-free dairy foods, like milk, cheese and yogurt, per day. Lifestyle choices, including eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight and getting enough physical activity, can help reduce the risk of high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

Click here to learn more about healthy eating patterns and how to build your plate and fill your glass and here for undeniably dairy recipes.