Latest recipes

Philadelphia’s Soda Tax Has Cut Sales in Half and Cost Jobs

Philadelphia’s Soda Tax Has Cut Sales in Half and Cost Jobs

Philadelphia’s soda tax, implemented last June, is already making a huge difference with mixed results

The extra 1.5 cents per ounce really made a difference.

Last year, when Philadelphia lobbied for (and won) the implementation of a soft drink tax, Big Soda fought it tooth and nail. Canada Dry Delaware Valley — a local soft drink distributor — has also reported a 45 percent decrease in sales. The pattern is alarming to businesses that rely on consumer popularity of the sweet drinks.

Philadelphia became the first major city last year to implement the soda tax, and other cities like San Francisco followed, with similar measures on the ballot in New York. Philadelphia’s tax went into effect on January 1.

“In 30 years of business, there’s never been a circumstance in which we’ve ever had a sales decline of any significant amount,” Jeff Brown, chief executive officer of Brown’s Super Stores, a franchise operation that owns a dozen Shop Rites, told Bloomberg. “I would describe the impact as nothing less than devastating.”

Sales are also hurting small local businesses like mom and pop grocery stores and bodegas. The sales tax is technically on the distributor side, but consumers are seeing their favorite drinks double in price due to the added costs.


Philadelphia's beverage tax is now in effect

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) -- Philadelphia's new beverage tax is now in effect.

It adds a penny and a half per-ounce charge on sodas, diet sodas, juices and other sweetened beverages for distributors.

A distributor, as described by the city, is any person who sells sweetened beverages to a dealer.

Mayor Jim Kenney's office says distributors are not required to pass the tax on to dealers, such as delis, restaurants, or grocery stores.

The 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax amounts to 18 cents on a 12-ounce can of soda or $1.44 on a six-pack of 16-ounce bottles. Boulder, Colorado, and three California cities - Albany, Oakland, and San Francisco - approved soda taxes in the November election, joining Philly and Berkeley, California. However, more than 30 cities and states have rejected beverage taxes.

The mayor's office says the new tax money will help pay for Kenney's universal Pre-K goal.

The office also says the money will kick cash into Community Schools, recreation centers, parks and the city's library system.

A court has already rejected a claim by the American Beverage Association that the tax duplicates the current state sales tax.

The beverage industry, and some businesses they supply, say the new tax will hurt working families and cost jobs.


Philadelphia's beverage tax is now in effect

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) -- Philadelphia's new beverage tax is now in effect.

It adds a penny and a half per-ounce charge on sodas, diet sodas, juices and other sweetened beverages for distributors.

A distributor, as described by the city, is any person who sells sweetened beverages to a dealer.

Mayor Jim Kenney's office says distributors are not required to pass the tax on to dealers, such as delis, restaurants, or grocery stores.

The 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax amounts to 18 cents on a 12-ounce can of soda or $1.44 on a six-pack of 16-ounce bottles. Boulder, Colorado, and three California cities - Albany, Oakland, and San Francisco - approved soda taxes in the November election, joining Philly and Berkeley, California. However, more than 30 cities and states have rejected beverage taxes.

The mayor's office says the new tax money will help pay for Kenney's universal Pre-K goal.

The office also says the money will kick cash into Community Schools, recreation centers, parks and the city's library system.

A court has already rejected a claim by the American Beverage Association that the tax duplicates the current state sales tax.

The beverage industry, and some businesses they supply, say the new tax will hurt working families and cost jobs.


Philadelphia's beverage tax is now in effect

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) -- Philadelphia's new beverage tax is now in effect.

It adds a penny and a half per-ounce charge on sodas, diet sodas, juices and other sweetened beverages for distributors.

A distributor, as described by the city, is any person who sells sweetened beverages to a dealer.

Mayor Jim Kenney's office says distributors are not required to pass the tax on to dealers, such as delis, restaurants, or grocery stores.

The 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax amounts to 18 cents on a 12-ounce can of soda or $1.44 on a six-pack of 16-ounce bottles. Boulder, Colorado, and three California cities - Albany, Oakland, and San Francisco - approved soda taxes in the November election, joining Philly and Berkeley, California. However, more than 30 cities and states have rejected beverage taxes.

The mayor's office says the new tax money will help pay for Kenney's universal Pre-K goal.

The office also says the money will kick cash into Community Schools, recreation centers, parks and the city's library system.

A court has already rejected a claim by the American Beverage Association that the tax duplicates the current state sales tax.

The beverage industry, and some businesses they supply, say the new tax will hurt working families and cost jobs.


Philadelphia's beverage tax is now in effect

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) -- Philadelphia's new beverage tax is now in effect.

It adds a penny and a half per-ounce charge on sodas, diet sodas, juices and other sweetened beverages for distributors.

A distributor, as described by the city, is any person who sells sweetened beverages to a dealer.

Mayor Jim Kenney's office says distributors are not required to pass the tax on to dealers, such as delis, restaurants, or grocery stores.

The 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax amounts to 18 cents on a 12-ounce can of soda or $1.44 on a six-pack of 16-ounce bottles. Boulder, Colorado, and three California cities - Albany, Oakland, and San Francisco - approved soda taxes in the November election, joining Philly and Berkeley, California. However, more than 30 cities and states have rejected beverage taxes.

The mayor's office says the new tax money will help pay for Kenney's universal Pre-K goal.

The office also says the money will kick cash into Community Schools, recreation centers, parks and the city's library system.

A court has already rejected a claim by the American Beverage Association that the tax duplicates the current state sales tax.

The beverage industry, and some businesses they supply, say the new tax will hurt working families and cost jobs.


Philadelphia's beverage tax is now in effect

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) -- Philadelphia's new beverage tax is now in effect.

It adds a penny and a half per-ounce charge on sodas, diet sodas, juices and other sweetened beverages for distributors.

A distributor, as described by the city, is any person who sells sweetened beverages to a dealer.

Mayor Jim Kenney's office says distributors are not required to pass the tax on to dealers, such as delis, restaurants, or grocery stores.

The 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax amounts to 18 cents on a 12-ounce can of soda or $1.44 on a six-pack of 16-ounce bottles. Boulder, Colorado, and three California cities - Albany, Oakland, and San Francisco - approved soda taxes in the November election, joining Philly and Berkeley, California. However, more than 30 cities and states have rejected beverage taxes.

The mayor's office says the new tax money will help pay for Kenney's universal Pre-K goal.

The office also says the money will kick cash into Community Schools, recreation centers, parks and the city's library system.

A court has already rejected a claim by the American Beverage Association that the tax duplicates the current state sales tax.

The beverage industry, and some businesses they supply, say the new tax will hurt working families and cost jobs.


Philadelphia's beverage tax is now in effect

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) -- Philadelphia's new beverage tax is now in effect.

It adds a penny and a half per-ounce charge on sodas, diet sodas, juices and other sweetened beverages for distributors.

A distributor, as described by the city, is any person who sells sweetened beverages to a dealer.

Mayor Jim Kenney's office says distributors are not required to pass the tax on to dealers, such as delis, restaurants, or grocery stores.

The 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax amounts to 18 cents on a 12-ounce can of soda or $1.44 on a six-pack of 16-ounce bottles. Boulder, Colorado, and three California cities - Albany, Oakland, and San Francisco - approved soda taxes in the November election, joining Philly and Berkeley, California. However, more than 30 cities and states have rejected beverage taxes.

The mayor's office says the new tax money will help pay for Kenney's universal Pre-K goal.

The office also says the money will kick cash into Community Schools, recreation centers, parks and the city's library system.

A court has already rejected a claim by the American Beverage Association that the tax duplicates the current state sales tax.

The beverage industry, and some businesses they supply, say the new tax will hurt working families and cost jobs.


Philadelphia's beverage tax is now in effect

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) -- Philadelphia's new beverage tax is now in effect.

It adds a penny and a half per-ounce charge on sodas, diet sodas, juices and other sweetened beverages for distributors.

A distributor, as described by the city, is any person who sells sweetened beverages to a dealer.

Mayor Jim Kenney's office says distributors are not required to pass the tax on to dealers, such as delis, restaurants, or grocery stores.

The 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax amounts to 18 cents on a 12-ounce can of soda or $1.44 on a six-pack of 16-ounce bottles. Boulder, Colorado, and three California cities - Albany, Oakland, and San Francisco - approved soda taxes in the November election, joining Philly and Berkeley, California. However, more than 30 cities and states have rejected beverage taxes.

The mayor's office says the new tax money will help pay for Kenney's universal Pre-K goal.

The office also says the money will kick cash into Community Schools, recreation centers, parks and the city's library system.

A court has already rejected a claim by the American Beverage Association that the tax duplicates the current state sales tax.

The beverage industry, and some businesses they supply, say the new tax will hurt working families and cost jobs.


Philadelphia's beverage tax is now in effect

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) -- Philadelphia's new beverage tax is now in effect.

It adds a penny and a half per-ounce charge on sodas, diet sodas, juices and other sweetened beverages for distributors.

A distributor, as described by the city, is any person who sells sweetened beverages to a dealer.

Mayor Jim Kenney's office says distributors are not required to pass the tax on to dealers, such as delis, restaurants, or grocery stores.

The 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax amounts to 18 cents on a 12-ounce can of soda or $1.44 on a six-pack of 16-ounce bottles. Boulder, Colorado, and three California cities - Albany, Oakland, and San Francisco - approved soda taxes in the November election, joining Philly and Berkeley, California. However, more than 30 cities and states have rejected beverage taxes.

The mayor's office says the new tax money will help pay for Kenney's universal Pre-K goal.

The office also says the money will kick cash into Community Schools, recreation centers, parks and the city's library system.

A court has already rejected a claim by the American Beverage Association that the tax duplicates the current state sales tax.

The beverage industry, and some businesses they supply, say the new tax will hurt working families and cost jobs.


Philadelphia's beverage tax is now in effect

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) -- Philadelphia's new beverage tax is now in effect.

It adds a penny and a half per-ounce charge on sodas, diet sodas, juices and other sweetened beverages for distributors.

A distributor, as described by the city, is any person who sells sweetened beverages to a dealer.

Mayor Jim Kenney's office says distributors are not required to pass the tax on to dealers, such as delis, restaurants, or grocery stores.

The 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax amounts to 18 cents on a 12-ounce can of soda or $1.44 on a six-pack of 16-ounce bottles. Boulder, Colorado, and three California cities - Albany, Oakland, and San Francisco - approved soda taxes in the November election, joining Philly and Berkeley, California. However, more than 30 cities and states have rejected beverage taxes.

The mayor's office says the new tax money will help pay for Kenney's universal Pre-K goal.

The office also says the money will kick cash into Community Schools, recreation centers, parks and the city's library system.

A court has already rejected a claim by the American Beverage Association that the tax duplicates the current state sales tax.

The beverage industry, and some businesses they supply, say the new tax will hurt working families and cost jobs.


Philadelphia's beverage tax is now in effect

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) -- Philadelphia's new beverage tax is now in effect.

It adds a penny and a half per-ounce charge on sodas, diet sodas, juices and other sweetened beverages for distributors.

A distributor, as described by the city, is any person who sells sweetened beverages to a dealer.

Mayor Jim Kenney's office says distributors are not required to pass the tax on to dealers, such as delis, restaurants, or grocery stores.

The 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax amounts to 18 cents on a 12-ounce can of soda or $1.44 on a six-pack of 16-ounce bottles. Boulder, Colorado, and three California cities - Albany, Oakland, and San Francisco - approved soda taxes in the November election, joining Philly and Berkeley, California. However, more than 30 cities and states have rejected beverage taxes.

The mayor's office says the new tax money will help pay for Kenney's universal Pre-K goal.

The office also says the money will kick cash into Community Schools, recreation centers, parks and the city's library system.

A court has already rejected a claim by the American Beverage Association that the tax duplicates the current state sales tax.

The beverage industry, and some businesses they supply, say the new tax will hurt working families and cost jobs.


Watch the video: Pennsylvania State Supreme Court Upholds Philadelphias Tax On Soda (December 2021).