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Four Seasons Auction Raises $4.1 Million, Exceeds Expectations

Four Seasons Auction Raises $4.1 Million, Exceeds Expectations

Patrons, collectors, and more gathered to have their own pieces of the iconic restaurant

The almost 15-hour sale took place in the Pool Room, where furniture, signage, flatware, and more were auctioned off.

It’s truly an end to an era.

The contents of the iconic Four Seasons restaurant were auctioned off for an impressive $4.1 million, far exceeding the presale estimate of $1.33 million, The New York Times reported.

The nearly 15-hour auction took place Tuesday in the Pool Room. Furniture, signage, flatware, cutlery, and other pieces were up for the taking.

The first lot — a bronze sign designed by Emil Antonucci that featured the restaurant’s seasonal logo — was sold for $96,000, though early auction estimates predicted it to sell for $5,000–$7,000. Four china dishes “reminiscent of a ‘Mad Men’ era” were sold to an unnamed telephone bidder for $10,000.

At the last minute, the restaurant’s owners Alex von Bidder and Julian Niccolini withdrew a number of items from the auction to donate to the Metropolitan Museum of Art for a Four Seasons period room.

Check out our roundup of the 30 best restaurants in New York City.


Majority of US adults under 30 now living with parents, study finds

The number of young adults living with their parents hit at least an eight-decade high in July, as the pandemic’s disruption of jobs hit young generations particularly hard.

More than half of adults under 30 (52%), or 26.6 million, are living with one or both of their parents as of July, according to a study of Census data from Pew Research Center. That’s up from 47% in February and exceeds the previous high of 48% in 1940, according to Census data.

It’s also the highest recorded level from the Census dating back to 1900, but no data is available from the Great Depression, which likely was worse, according to Pew.

The increase is part of an upward trend since the 1960s, but the coronavirus distorted that trajectory after states implemented shutdowns and companies laid off workers or moved to remote work. But the effects could take awhile to wane.

“For the most part, nobody wants to be living at home with mom and dad,” said Jeremy Sopko, CEO of Nations Lending Corporation, a mortgage lender. “It's a difficult situation that's been exacerbated by the pandemic and it may take years, if not the better part of a decade, for younger demographics to recover and be financially stable enough to leave home.”


Majority of US adults under 30 now living with parents, study finds

The number of young adults living with their parents hit at least an eight-decade high in July, as the pandemic’s disruption of jobs hit young generations particularly hard.

More than half of adults under 30 (52%), or 26.6 million, are living with one or both of their parents as of July, according to a study of Census data from Pew Research Center. That’s up from 47% in February and exceeds the previous high of 48% in 1940, according to Census data.

It’s also the highest recorded level from the Census dating back to 1900, but no data is available from the Great Depression, which likely was worse, according to Pew.

The increase is part of an upward trend since the 1960s, but the coronavirus distorted that trajectory after states implemented shutdowns and companies laid off workers or moved to remote work. But the effects could take awhile to wane.

“For the most part, nobody wants to be living at home with mom and dad,” said Jeremy Sopko, CEO of Nations Lending Corporation, a mortgage lender. “It's a difficult situation that's been exacerbated by the pandemic and it may take years, if not the better part of a decade, for younger demographics to recover and be financially stable enough to leave home.”


Majority of US adults under 30 now living with parents, study finds

The number of young adults living with their parents hit at least an eight-decade high in July, as the pandemic’s disruption of jobs hit young generations particularly hard.

More than half of adults under 30 (52%), or 26.6 million, are living with one or both of their parents as of July, according to a study of Census data from Pew Research Center. That’s up from 47% in February and exceeds the previous high of 48% in 1940, according to Census data.

It’s also the highest recorded level from the Census dating back to 1900, but no data is available from the Great Depression, which likely was worse, according to Pew.

The increase is part of an upward trend since the 1960s, but the coronavirus distorted that trajectory after states implemented shutdowns and companies laid off workers or moved to remote work. But the effects could take awhile to wane.

“For the most part, nobody wants to be living at home with mom and dad,” said Jeremy Sopko, CEO of Nations Lending Corporation, a mortgage lender. “It's a difficult situation that's been exacerbated by the pandemic and it may take years, if not the better part of a decade, for younger demographics to recover and be financially stable enough to leave home.”


Majority of US adults under 30 now living with parents, study finds

The number of young adults living with their parents hit at least an eight-decade high in July, as the pandemic’s disruption of jobs hit young generations particularly hard.

More than half of adults under 30 (52%), or 26.6 million, are living with one or both of their parents as of July, according to a study of Census data from Pew Research Center. That’s up from 47% in February and exceeds the previous high of 48% in 1940, according to Census data.

It’s also the highest recorded level from the Census dating back to 1900, but no data is available from the Great Depression, which likely was worse, according to Pew.

The increase is part of an upward trend since the 1960s, but the coronavirus distorted that trajectory after states implemented shutdowns and companies laid off workers or moved to remote work. But the effects could take awhile to wane.

“For the most part, nobody wants to be living at home with mom and dad,” said Jeremy Sopko, CEO of Nations Lending Corporation, a mortgage lender. “It's a difficult situation that's been exacerbated by the pandemic and it may take years, if not the better part of a decade, for younger demographics to recover and be financially stable enough to leave home.”


Majority of US adults under 30 now living with parents, study finds

The number of young adults living with their parents hit at least an eight-decade high in July, as the pandemic’s disruption of jobs hit young generations particularly hard.

More than half of adults under 30 (52%), or 26.6 million, are living with one or both of their parents as of July, according to a study of Census data from Pew Research Center. That’s up from 47% in February and exceeds the previous high of 48% in 1940, according to Census data.

It’s also the highest recorded level from the Census dating back to 1900, but no data is available from the Great Depression, which likely was worse, according to Pew.

The increase is part of an upward trend since the 1960s, but the coronavirus distorted that trajectory after states implemented shutdowns and companies laid off workers or moved to remote work. But the effects could take awhile to wane.

“For the most part, nobody wants to be living at home with mom and dad,” said Jeremy Sopko, CEO of Nations Lending Corporation, a mortgage lender. “It's a difficult situation that's been exacerbated by the pandemic and it may take years, if not the better part of a decade, for younger demographics to recover and be financially stable enough to leave home.”


Majority of US adults under 30 now living with parents, study finds

The number of young adults living with their parents hit at least an eight-decade high in July, as the pandemic’s disruption of jobs hit young generations particularly hard.

More than half of adults under 30 (52%), or 26.6 million, are living with one or both of their parents as of July, according to a study of Census data from Pew Research Center. That’s up from 47% in February and exceeds the previous high of 48% in 1940, according to Census data.

It’s also the highest recorded level from the Census dating back to 1900, but no data is available from the Great Depression, which likely was worse, according to Pew.

The increase is part of an upward trend since the 1960s, but the coronavirus distorted that trajectory after states implemented shutdowns and companies laid off workers or moved to remote work. But the effects could take awhile to wane.

“For the most part, nobody wants to be living at home with mom and dad,” said Jeremy Sopko, CEO of Nations Lending Corporation, a mortgage lender. “It's a difficult situation that's been exacerbated by the pandemic and it may take years, if not the better part of a decade, for younger demographics to recover and be financially stable enough to leave home.”


Majority of US adults under 30 now living with parents, study finds

The number of young adults living with their parents hit at least an eight-decade high in July, as the pandemic’s disruption of jobs hit young generations particularly hard.

More than half of adults under 30 (52%), or 26.6 million, are living with one or both of their parents as of July, according to a study of Census data from Pew Research Center. That’s up from 47% in February and exceeds the previous high of 48% in 1940, according to Census data.

It’s also the highest recorded level from the Census dating back to 1900, but no data is available from the Great Depression, which likely was worse, according to Pew.

The increase is part of an upward trend since the 1960s, but the coronavirus distorted that trajectory after states implemented shutdowns and companies laid off workers or moved to remote work. But the effects could take awhile to wane.

“For the most part, nobody wants to be living at home with mom and dad,” said Jeremy Sopko, CEO of Nations Lending Corporation, a mortgage lender. “It's a difficult situation that's been exacerbated by the pandemic and it may take years, if not the better part of a decade, for younger demographics to recover and be financially stable enough to leave home.”


Majority of US adults under 30 now living with parents, study finds

The number of young adults living with their parents hit at least an eight-decade high in July, as the pandemic’s disruption of jobs hit young generations particularly hard.

More than half of adults under 30 (52%), or 26.6 million, are living with one or both of their parents as of July, according to a study of Census data from Pew Research Center. That’s up from 47% in February and exceeds the previous high of 48% in 1940, according to Census data.

It’s also the highest recorded level from the Census dating back to 1900, but no data is available from the Great Depression, which likely was worse, according to Pew.

The increase is part of an upward trend since the 1960s, but the coronavirus distorted that trajectory after states implemented shutdowns and companies laid off workers or moved to remote work. But the effects could take awhile to wane.

“For the most part, nobody wants to be living at home with mom and dad,” said Jeremy Sopko, CEO of Nations Lending Corporation, a mortgage lender. “It's a difficult situation that's been exacerbated by the pandemic and it may take years, if not the better part of a decade, for younger demographics to recover and be financially stable enough to leave home.”


Majority of US adults under 30 now living with parents, study finds

The number of young adults living with their parents hit at least an eight-decade high in July, as the pandemic’s disruption of jobs hit young generations particularly hard.

More than half of adults under 30 (52%), or 26.6 million, are living with one or both of their parents as of July, according to a study of Census data from Pew Research Center. That’s up from 47% in February and exceeds the previous high of 48% in 1940, according to Census data.

It’s also the highest recorded level from the Census dating back to 1900, but no data is available from the Great Depression, which likely was worse, according to Pew.

The increase is part of an upward trend since the 1960s, but the coronavirus distorted that trajectory after states implemented shutdowns and companies laid off workers or moved to remote work. But the effects could take awhile to wane.

“For the most part, nobody wants to be living at home with mom and dad,” said Jeremy Sopko, CEO of Nations Lending Corporation, a mortgage lender. “It's a difficult situation that's been exacerbated by the pandemic and it may take years, if not the better part of a decade, for younger demographics to recover and be financially stable enough to leave home.”


Majority of US adults under 30 now living with parents, study finds

The number of young adults living with their parents hit at least an eight-decade high in July, as the pandemic’s disruption of jobs hit young generations particularly hard.

More than half of adults under 30 (52%), or 26.6 million, are living with one or both of their parents as of July, according to a study of Census data from Pew Research Center. That’s up from 47% in February and exceeds the previous high of 48% in 1940, according to Census data.

It’s also the highest recorded level from the Census dating back to 1900, but no data is available from the Great Depression, which likely was worse, according to Pew.

The increase is part of an upward trend since the 1960s, but the coronavirus distorted that trajectory after states implemented shutdowns and companies laid off workers or moved to remote work. But the effects could take awhile to wane.

“For the most part, nobody wants to be living at home with mom and dad,” said Jeremy Sopko, CEO of Nations Lending Corporation, a mortgage lender. “It's a difficult situation that's been exacerbated by the pandemic and it may take years, if not the better part of a decade, for younger demographics to recover and be financially stable enough to leave home.”


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