Latest recipes

How to Take Your Biscuits to the Next Level

How to Take Your Biscuits to the Next Level

But they get even better with a few additional ingredients like fruits and cheese. Or you could mix it up a bit by frying them instead of baking them. Here’s a list of recipes you can use to jazz things up for your biscuits:

Apple Fritter Pull-Apart Bread

Photo by Rachel Davis

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes

Servings: 4-6

Ingredients:
1 can Pillsbury Grands refrigerated biscuits (buttermilk, original or honey butter all work well)

Filling:
2 granny smith apples, very finely diced
1 teaspoon lemon juice
⅓ cup brown sugar
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
½ teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 350ºF. Spray loaf pan with cooking spray or line with baking sheet.
2. In a saucepan add filling ingredients over medium heat and stir until apples are brown.
3. Using your hands, press each biscuit to thin it out, and top each one with a tablespoon of filling until all the biscuit rounds have been used.
4. Stack the biscuits on top of each other and place them into the loaf pan.
5. Arrange them so that no fillings touch both ends of the pan.
6. Pour any remaining apple filling over the dough in the pan.
7. Bake for 30 minutes.

Tip: Strawberries, blueberries and peaches are great for fillings too.

Garlic Bread

Photo by Rachel Davis

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes

Servings: 2-4

Ingredients:
1 can Pillsbury Grands refrigerated biscuits (buttermilk, original, or honey butter all work well)
Garlic powder
Shredded cheese (any kind)
Parsley (optional)

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 350ºF, line pan with baking sheet.
2. Cut biscuits into fourths.
3. In a bowl, add in garlic powder, cheese and parsley. Mix well.
4. Add biscuits in bowl and mix until well coated.
5. Places biscuits onto pan and bake for 10-12 minutes.

It doesn’t end there, check out all these other awesome biscuit recipes:

  • Pumpkin pie filled donuts
  • Nutella fried pies
  • Monkey bread
  • Pineapple upside down biscuits
  • Glazed donuts

The post How to Take Your Biscuits to the Next Level appeared first on Spoon University.


The Best Thing to Do with Your Biscuit Scraps

Erika Council, the force behind Atlanta&rsquos Bomb Biscuits, has a clever, no-waste trick to get more out of your next batch of biscuits.

As an Alabamian who moved to New York City 15 years ago, I get asked about biscuits a lot. My advice is always the same: Buy the right flour (soft white winter wheat if you can, cake flour if you can’t), keep everything very cold, and don’t overwork the dough. But now, thanks to Atlanta’s 𠇋iscuit jedi,” Erika Council, I have another good tip: Put your slab of dough on your baking sheet, cut out the biscuits but keep the scraps around the biscuit rounds, and then bake the whole thing, scraps and all. 

This method, which Council posted about on Twitter and Instagram in July, is wildly clever for a couple reasons. First, it means you don’t need to re-roll out the biscuit dough to punch out another few biscuits. The more you work the biscuit dough, the more gluten forms, meaning that you get tough, rather than tender biscuits. Second, it means that you have glorious little biscuit end scraps, which are fantastic for scooping up gravy or just snacking on. I tried it at home and loved it so much I may never make biscuits another way. 


The Best Thing to Do with Your Biscuit Scraps

Erika Council, the force behind Atlanta&rsquos Bomb Biscuits, has a clever, no-waste trick to get more out of your next batch of biscuits.

As an Alabamian who moved to New York City 15 years ago, I get asked about biscuits a lot. My advice is always the same: Buy the right flour (soft white winter wheat if you can, cake flour if you can’t), keep everything very cold, and don’t overwork the dough. But now, thanks to Atlanta’s 𠇋iscuit jedi,” Erika Council, I have another good tip: Put your slab of dough on your baking sheet, cut out the biscuits but keep the scraps around the biscuit rounds, and then bake the whole thing, scraps and all. 

This method, which Council posted about on Twitter and Instagram in July, is wildly clever for a couple reasons. First, it means you don’t need to re-roll out the biscuit dough to punch out another few biscuits. The more you work the biscuit dough, the more gluten forms, meaning that you get tough, rather than tender biscuits. Second, it means that you have glorious little biscuit end scraps, which are fantastic for scooping up gravy or just snacking on. I tried it at home and loved it so much I may never make biscuits another way. 


The Best Thing to Do with Your Biscuit Scraps

Erika Council, the force behind Atlanta&rsquos Bomb Biscuits, has a clever, no-waste trick to get more out of your next batch of biscuits.

As an Alabamian who moved to New York City 15 years ago, I get asked about biscuits a lot. My advice is always the same: Buy the right flour (soft white winter wheat if you can, cake flour if you can’t), keep everything very cold, and don’t overwork the dough. But now, thanks to Atlanta’s 𠇋iscuit jedi,” Erika Council, I have another good tip: Put your slab of dough on your baking sheet, cut out the biscuits but keep the scraps around the biscuit rounds, and then bake the whole thing, scraps and all. 

This method, which Council posted about on Twitter and Instagram in July, is wildly clever for a couple reasons. First, it means you don’t need to re-roll out the biscuit dough to punch out another few biscuits. The more you work the biscuit dough, the more gluten forms, meaning that you get tough, rather than tender biscuits. Second, it means that you have glorious little biscuit end scraps, which are fantastic for scooping up gravy or just snacking on. I tried it at home and loved it so much I may never make biscuits another way. 


The Best Thing to Do with Your Biscuit Scraps

Erika Council, the force behind Atlanta&rsquos Bomb Biscuits, has a clever, no-waste trick to get more out of your next batch of biscuits.

As an Alabamian who moved to New York City 15 years ago, I get asked about biscuits a lot. My advice is always the same: Buy the right flour (soft white winter wheat if you can, cake flour if you can’t), keep everything very cold, and don’t overwork the dough. But now, thanks to Atlanta’s 𠇋iscuit jedi,” Erika Council, I have another good tip: Put your slab of dough on your baking sheet, cut out the biscuits but keep the scraps around the biscuit rounds, and then bake the whole thing, scraps and all. 

This method, which Council posted about on Twitter and Instagram in July, is wildly clever for a couple reasons. First, it means you don’t need to re-roll out the biscuit dough to punch out another few biscuits. The more you work the biscuit dough, the more gluten forms, meaning that you get tough, rather than tender biscuits. Second, it means that you have glorious little biscuit end scraps, which are fantastic for scooping up gravy or just snacking on. I tried it at home and loved it so much I may never make biscuits another way. 


The Best Thing to Do with Your Biscuit Scraps

Erika Council, the force behind Atlanta&rsquos Bomb Biscuits, has a clever, no-waste trick to get more out of your next batch of biscuits.

As an Alabamian who moved to New York City 15 years ago, I get asked about biscuits a lot. My advice is always the same: Buy the right flour (soft white winter wheat if you can, cake flour if you can’t), keep everything very cold, and don’t overwork the dough. But now, thanks to Atlanta’s 𠇋iscuit jedi,” Erika Council, I have another good tip: Put your slab of dough on your baking sheet, cut out the biscuits but keep the scraps around the biscuit rounds, and then bake the whole thing, scraps and all. 

This method, which Council posted about on Twitter and Instagram in July, is wildly clever for a couple reasons. First, it means you don’t need to re-roll out the biscuit dough to punch out another few biscuits. The more you work the biscuit dough, the more gluten forms, meaning that you get tough, rather than tender biscuits. Second, it means that you have glorious little biscuit end scraps, which are fantastic for scooping up gravy or just snacking on. I tried it at home and loved it so much I may never make biscuits another way. 


The Best Thing to Do with Your Biscuit Scraps

Erika Council, the force behind Atlanta&rsquos Bomb Biscuits, has a clever, no-waste trick to get more out of your next batch of biscuits.

As an Alabamian who moved to New York City 15 years ago, I get asked about biscuits a lot. My advice is always the same: Buy the right flour (soft white winter wheat if you can, cake flour if you can’t), keep everything very cold, and don’t overwork the dough. But now, thanks to Atlanta’s 𠇋iscuit jedi,” Erika Council, I have another good tip: Put your slab of dough on your baking sheet, cut out the biscuits but keep the scraps around the biscuit rounds, and then bake the whole thing, scraps and all. 

This method, which Council posted about on Twitter and Instagram in July, is wildly clever for a couple reasons. First, it means you don’t need to re-roll out the biscuit dough to punch out another few biscuits. The more you work the biscuit dough, the more gluten forms, meaning that you get tough, rather than tender biscuits. Second, it means that you have glorious little biscuit end scraps, which are fantastic for scooping up gravy or just snacking on. I tried it at home and loved it so much I may never make biscuits another way. 


The Best Thing to Do with Your Biscuit Scraps

Erika Council, the force behind Atlanta&rsquos Bomb Biscuits, has a clever, no-waste trick to get more out of your next batch of biscuits.

As an Alabamian who moved to New York City 15 years ago, I get asked about biscuits a lot. My advice is always the same: Buy the right flour (soft white winter wheat if you can, cake flour if you can’t), keep everything very cold, and don’t overwork the dough. But now, thanks to Atlanta’s 𠇋iscuit jedi,” Erika Council, I have another good tip: Put your slab of dough on your baking sheet, cut out the biscuits but keep the scraps around the biscuit rounds, and then bake the whole thing, scraps and all. 

This method, which Council posted about on Twitter and Instagram in July, is wildly clever for a couple reasons. First, it means you don’t need to re-roll out the biscuit dough to punch out another few biscuits. The more you work the biscuit dough, the more gluten forms, meaning that you get tough, rather than tender biscuits. Second, it means that you have glorious little biscuit end scraps, which are fantastic for scooping up gravy or just snacking on. I tried it at home and loved it so much I may never make biscuits another way. 


The Best Thing to Do with Your Biscuit Scraps

Erika Council, the force behind Atlanta&rsquos Bomb Biscuits, has a clever, no-waste trick to get more out of your next batch of biscuits.

As an Alabamian who moved to New York City 15 years ago, I get asked about biscuits a lot. My advice is always the same: Buy the right flour (soft white winter wheat if you can, cake flour if you can’t), keep everything very cold, and don’t overwork the dough. But now, thanks to Atlanta’s 𠇋iscuit jedi,” Erika Council, I have another good tip: Put your slab of dough on your baking sheet, cut out the biscuits but keep the scraps around the biscuit rounds, and then bake the whole thing, scraps and all. 

This method, which Council posted about on Twitter and Instagram in July, is wildly clever for a couple reasons. First, it means you don’t need to re-roll out the biscuit dough to punch out another few biscuits. The more you work the biscuit dough, the more gluten forms, meaning that you get tough, rather than tender biscuits. Second, it means that you have glorious little biscuit end scraps, which are fantastic for scooping up gravy or just snacking on. I tried it at home and loved it so much I may never make biscuits another way. 


The Best Thing to Do with Your Biscuit Scraps

Erika Council, the force behind Atlanta&rsquos Bomb Biscuits, has a clever, no-waste trick to get more out of your next batch of biscuits.

As an Alabamian who moved to New York City 15 years ago, I get asked about biscuits a lot. My advice is always the same: Buy the right flour (soft white winter wheat if you can, cake flour if you can’t), keep everything very cold, and don’t overwork the dough. But now, thanks to Atlanta’s 𠇋iscuit jedi,” Erika Council, I have another good tip: Put your slab of dough on your baking sheet, cut out the biscuits but keep the scraps around the biscuit rounds, and then bake the whole thing, scraps and all. 

This method, which Council posted about on Twitter and Instagram in July, is wildly clever for a couple reasons. First, it means you don’t need to re-roll out the biscuit dough to punch out another few biscuits. The more you work the biscuit dough, the more gluten forms, meaning that you get tough, rather than tender biscuits. Second, it means that you have glorious little biscuit end scraps, which are fantastic for scooping up gravy or just snacking on. I tried it at home and loved it so much I may never make biscuits another way. 


The Best Thing to Do with Your Biscuit Scraps

Erika Council, the force behind Atlanta&rsquos Bomb Biscuits, has a clever, no-waste trick to get more out of your next batch of biscuits.

As an Alabamian who moved to New York City 15 years ago, I get asked about biscuits a lot. My advice is always the same: Buy the right flour (soft white winter wheat if you can, cake flour if you can’t), keep everything very cold, and don’t overwork the dough. But now, thanks to Atlanta’s 𠇋iscuit jedi,” Erika Council, I have another good tip: Put your slab of dough on your baking sheet, cut out the biscuits but keep the scraps around the biscuit rounds, and then bake the whole thing, scraps and all. 

This method, which Council posted about on Twitter and Instagram in July, is wildly clever for a couple reasons. First, it means you don’t need to re-roll out the biscuit dough to punch out another few biscuits. The more you work the biscuit dough, the more gluten forms, meaning that you get tough, rather than tender biscuits. Second, it means that you have glorious little biscuit end scraps, which are fantastic for scooping up gravy or just snacking on. I tried it at home and loved it so much I may never make biscuits another way.