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Hong Kong Dining Just Became a Little (Okay, a Lot) More French

Hong Kong Dining Just Became a Little (Okay, a Lot) More French

Four Seasons Hotel Hong Kong is a rare beast. For one, Lung King Heen is perhaps the city’s most-revered Cantonese restaurant, thanks to Chan Yan Tak, the first Chinese chef to earn three Michelin stars. And then there’s the Michelin two-star Caprice restaurant, staffed by a team of 25 chefs cooking up an innovative taste of France coupled with its extensive selection of wines from Bordeaux and Burgundy, accented by Hong Kong’s first cellar of artisanal French cheeses.

Now taking over Caprice’s kitchen from chef Fabrice Vulin is the new chef de cuisine, Guillaume Galliot, a leader in contemporary French gastronomy. He brings his talents to Hong Kong after years in Macau, where he established the Tasting Room by Galliot in the City of Dreams as one of Asia’s finest restaurants; it was recognized with a Michelin star in its first year, then two stars in 2016 and 2017.

Born in the town of Chambray-lès-Tours in the Loire Valley, Galliot got his start under twin brother chefs Jacques and Laurent Pourcel at the three-Michelin-star Jardin des Sens. Galliot worked for a time there in pastry, an experience that left him with an appreciation of the dessert arts. After stints in New York and St. Barts in the Caribbean, the then-23-year-old Galliot moved to Singapore, becoming the youngest sous chef in the history of the iconic Raffles Hotel, followed by a run at Raffles Hotel Beijing.

Galliot now brings his classically French technique to the open kitchen and elegant dining room of Caprice, dressed in a modern Chinoiserie décor, with Czech crystal chandeliers, and panoramic sixth-floor views of Victoria Harbor and the Kowloon Peninsula. The new menu features produce flown in daily from France.

"Caprice has been one of my favorite French restaurants in Hong Kong,” says Galliot. “It is a privilege to join the Caprice team and have the opportunity to continue what chef Vincent Thierry started and chef Fabrice Vulin contributed during their tenures.”

Take a slideshow tour of Caprice Restaurant here.


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Now, now, we all know the age-old questions surrounding these buttery Scottish baked goods. Originated in the early 1500s, these round, plate-sized, griddle baked Scottish quick bread used to be made with oat. Rumour has it that the word &ldquoscone&rdquo was derived from the Stone of Destiny, where Scottish kings were crowned. Then in the 18th century, it was Anna, the Duchess of Bedford who made scones a fashionable afternoon tea tradition when she ordered some sweet bread and grew fond of it ever since. With a wider selection of ingredients aside from flour and butter available nowadays, you can expect to try some curious flavours. For those who love a good classic scone&mdashor &ldquoscon&rdquo&mdashit&rsquos always a battle between clotted cream or jam first. Tatler&rsquos resident scone enthusiast, deputy editor Lauren James of Birmingham, says she&rsquoll have hers always with jam first. But she warns, &ldquoanyone who gets worked up about that is silly&rdquo.

However you take your scones, here are ten of our current favourites.


You've Successfully Subscribed

Now, now, we all know the age-old questions surrounding these buttery Scottish baked goods. Originated in the early 1500s, these round, plate-sized, griddle baked Scottish quick bread used to be made with oat. Rumour has it that the word &ldquoscone&rdquo was derived from the Stone of Destiny, where Scottish kings were crowned. Then in the 18th century, it was Anna, the Duchess of Bedford who made scones a fashionable afternoon tea tradition when she ordered some sweet bread and grew fond of it ever since. With a wider selection of ingredients aside from flour and butter available nowadays, you can expect to try some curious flavours. For those who love a good classic scone&mdashor &ldquoscon&rdquo&mdashit&rsquos always a battle between clotted cream or jam first. Tatler&rsquos resident scone enthusiast, deputy editor Lauren James of Birmingham, says she&rsquoll have hers always with jam first. But she warns, &ldquoanyone who gets worked up about that is silly&rdquo.

However you take your scones, here are ten of our current favourites.


You've Successfully Subscribed

Now, now, we all know the age-old questions surrounding these buttery Scottish baked goods. Originated in the early 1500s, these round, plate-sized, griddle baked Scottish quick bread used to be made with oat. Rumour has it that the word &ldquoscone&rdquo was derived from the Stone of Destiny, where Scottish kings were crowned. Then in the 18th century, it was Anna, the Duchess of Bedford who made scones a fashionable afternoon tea tradition when she ordered some sweet bread and grew fond of it ever since. With a wider selection of ingredients aside from flour and butter available nowadays, you can expect to try some curious flavours. For those who love a good classic scone&mdashor &ldquoscon&rdquo&mdashit&rsquos always a battle between clotted cream or jam first. Tatler&rsquos resident scone enthusiast, deputy editor Lauren James of Birmingham, says she&rsquoll have hers always with jam first. But she warns, &ldquoanyone who gets worked up about that is silly&rdquo.

However you take your scones, here are ten of our current favourites.


You've Successfully Subscribed

Now, now, we all know the age-old questions surrounding these buttery Scottish baked goods. Originated in the early 1500s, these round, plate-sized, griddle baked Scottish quick bread used to be made with oat. Rumour has it that the word &ldquoscone&rdquo was derived from the Stone of Destiny, where Scottish kings were crowned. Then in the 18th century, it was Anna, the Duchess of Bedford who made scones a fashionable afternoon tea tradition when she ordered some sweet bread and grew fond of it ever since. With a wider selection of ingredients aside from flour and butter available nowadays, you can expect to try some curious flavours. For those who love a good classic scone&mdashor &ldquoscon&rdquo&mdashit&rsquos always a battle between clotted cream or jam first. Tatler&rsquos resident scone enthusiast, deputy editor Lauren James of Birmingham, says she&rsquoll have hers always with jam first. But she warns, &ldquoanyone who gets worked up about that is silly&rdquo.

However you take your scones, here are ten of our current favourites.


You've Successfully Subscribed

Now, now, we all know the age-old questions surrounding these buttery Scottish baked goods. Originated in the early 1500s, these round, plate-sized, griddle baked Scottish quick bread used to be made with oat. Rumour has it that the word &ldquoscone&rdquo was derived from the Stone of Destiny, where Scottish kings were crowned. Then in the 18th century, it was Anna, the Duchess of Bedford who made scones a fashionable afternoon tea tradition when she ordered some sweet bread and grew fond of it ever since. With a wider selection of ingredients aside from flour and butter available nowadays, you can expect to try some curious flavours. For those who love a good classic scone&mdashor &ldquoscon&rdquo&mdashit&rsquos always a battle between clotted cream or jam first. Tatler&rsquos resident scone enthusiast, deputy editor Lauren James of Birmingham, says she&rsquoll have hers always with jam first. But she warns, &ldquoanyone who gets worked up about that is silly&rdquo.

However you take your scones, here are ten of our current favourites.


You've Successfully Subscribed

Now, now, we all know the age-old questions surrounding these buttery Scottish baked goods. Originated in the early 1500s, these round, plate-sized, griddle baked Scottish quick bread used to be made with oat. Rumour has it that the word &ldquoscone&rdquo was derived from the Stone of Destiny, where Scottish kings were crowned. Then in the 18th century, it was Anna, the Duchess of Bedford who made scones a fashionable afternoon tea tradition when she ordered some sweet bread and grew fond of it ever since. With a wider selection of ingredients aside from flour and butter available nowadays, you can expect to try some curious flavours. For those who love a good classic scone&mdashor &ldquoscon&rdquo&mdashit&rsquos always a battle between clotted cream or jam first. Tatler&rsquos resident scone enthusiast, deputy editor Lauren James of Birmingham, says she&rsquoll have hers always with jam first. But she warns, &ldquoanyone who gets worked up about that is silly&rdquo.

However you take your scones, here are ten of our current favourites.


You've Successfully Subscribed

Now, now, we all know the age-old questions surrounding these buttery Scottish baked goods. Originated in the early 1500s, these round, plate-sized, griddle baked Scottish quick bread used to be made with oat. Rumour has it that the word &ldquoscone&rdquo was derived from the Stone of Destiny, where Scottish kings were crowned. Then in the 18th century, it was Anna, the Duchess of Bedford who made scones a fashionable afternoon tea tradition when she ordered some sweet bread and grew fond of it ever since. With a wider selection of ingredients aside from flour and butter available nowadays, you can expect to try some curious flavours. For those who love a good classic scone&mdashor &ldquoscon&rdquo&mdashit&rsquos always a battle between clotted cream or jam first. Tatler&rsquos resident scone enthusiast, deputy editor Lauren James of Birmingham, says she&rsquoll have hers always with jam first. But she warns, &ldquoanyone who gets worked up about that is silly&rdquo.

However you take your scones, here are ten of our current favourites.


You've Successfully Subscribed

Now, now, we all know the age-old questions surrounding these buttery Scottish baked goods. Originated in the early 1500s, these round, plate-sized, griddle baked Scottish quick bread used to be made with oat. Rumour has it that the word &ldquoscone&rdquo was derived from the Stone of Destiny, where Scottish kings were crowned. Then in the 18th century, it was Anna, the Duchess of Bedford who made scones a fashionable afternoon tea tradition when she ordered some sweet bread and grew fond of it ever since. With a wider selection of ingredients aside from flour and butter available nowadays, you can expect to try some curious flavours. For those who love a good classic scone&mdashor &ldquoscon&rdquo&mdashit&rsquos always a battle between clotted cream or jam first. Tatler&rsquos resident scone enthusiast, deputy editor Lauren James of Birmingham, says she&rsquoll have hers always with jam first. But she warns, &ldquoanyone who gets worked up about that is silly&rdquo.

However you take your scones, here are ten of our current favourites.


You've Successfully Subscribed

Now, now, we all know the age-old questions surrounding these buttery Scottish baked goods. Originated in the early 1500s, these round, plate-sized, griddle baked Scottish quick bread used to be made with oat. Rumour has it that the word &ldquoscone&rdquo was derived from the Stone of Destiny, where Scottish kings were crowned. Then in the 18th century, it was Anna, the Duchess of Bedford who made scones a fashionable afternoon tea tradition when she ordered some sweet bread and grew fond of it ever since. With a wider selection of ingredients aside from flour and butter available nowadays, you can expect to try some curious flavours. For those who love a good classic scone&mdashor &ldquoscon&rdquo&mdashit&rsquos always a battle between clotted cream or jam first. Tatler&rsquos resident scone enthusiast, deputy editor Lauren James of Birmingham, says she&rsquoll have hers always with jam first. But she warns, &ldquoanyone who gets worked up about that is silly&rdquo.

However you take your scones, here are ten of our current favourites.


You've Successfully Subscribed

Now, now, we all know the age-old questions surrounding these buttery Scottish baked goods. Originated in the early 1500s, these round, plate-sized, griddle baked Scottish quick bread used to be made with oat. Rumour has it that the word &ldquoscone&rdquo was derived from the Stone of Destiny, where Scottish kings were crowned. Then in the 18th century, it was Anna, the Duchess of Bedford who made scones a fashionable afternoon tea tradition when she ordered some sweet bread and grew fond of it ever since. With a wider selection of ingredients aside from flour and butter available nowadays, you can expect to try some curious flavours. For those who love a good classic scone&mdashor &ldquoscon&rdquo&mdashit&rsquos always a battle between clotted cream or jam first. Tatler&rsquos resident scone enthusiast, deputy editor Lauren James of Birmingham, says she&rsquoll have hers always with jam first. But she warns, &ldquoanyone who gets worked up about that is silly&rdquo.

However you take your scones, here are ten of our current favourites.


Watch the video: Unterwegs in Hongkongs Garküchen (December 2021).