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Where to Find America’s Best Martinis

Where to Find America’s Best Martinis

There’s a reason why the martini is the most fascinating cocktail on the planet — and a reason that it’s so often been bastardized into a completely new drink. The history of the martini is long and convoluted, and nowadays, you’ll most likely find that the word "martini" is proceeded or followed by a mixture of terms: chocolate, green apple, pumpkin … the list goes on and on.Perhaps the onslaught of insane martinis has pushed the classic martini recipes — the ones with vermouth, gin, and an olive — out and ushered in the age of brown spirits and cocktails. But when a martini is done right, it’s hard to beat.

Now, how a martini should be made is up for debate. History says to use gin (one of the first recipes, in 1895, calls for gin) but vodka, being the most-consumed spirit in the U.S., has eked its way into the martini glass. Gin versus vodka is such a hotly debated subject among our staff, our bartender friends, and drink makers that we simply can’t decide — one of each, perhaps? And then there’s the nitty-gritty of the choice of vermouth (and how much to add, making it a dry or wet martini), whether you like yours shaken versus stirred, with olives or citrus zest… You can make yourself dizzy trying to find the game-stopping, end-all, be-all martini recipe. (We’ll definitely be watching the outcome of Slate’s Martini Madness bracket — 80 recipes, only one winner.)

So it’s no easy task to narrow down a list of the bars and restaurants where you can find the best martinis in the U.S. You’re more likely to find a green apple martini than a classic gin martini at most bars and restaurants — but that shouldn’t stop you from looking. We searched high and low to find where you can order a classic (or close) martini, made with either gin or vodka, vermouth, and either citrus zest or an olive. No fuss, no add-ons — just a timeless martini that will take you back to the days of Don Draper and the 1950s and '60s. (Granted, this is a hard feat; even some of the bars on the list will serve you a sugary sweet Lemon Drop martini. But we can overlook a few perplexing martinis for one really great traditional version.) Then, we examined the bars themselves — which watering holes best lent themselves to the aura and mystery of a martini (and maybe a little James Bond, we admit). Some of the bars are political haunts, some of the bars are new and chic cocktail destinations, and some of the bars are solely dedicated to gin — major bonus points. So if you’re giving the martini a side-eye, sidle up to these bars and just try one. Love it or hate it, it’s an experience in itself.

1. The Peacock Alley at the Waldorf Astoria, New York City
It should be no surprise that this hotel lounge is the perfect setting for a martini: a luxurious, Art Deco space that brings you back to the days when martinis ruled the bars. And this is where you’ll find not only the Martinez (the martini’s drawn-out sibling), but the Platinum Martini, made with Double Cross vodka, Noilly Prat dry vermouth, and topped with a house-made artisanal blue cheese olive. You win, Peacock Alley. If you’re willing to spend $25 on one martini, it better be one that’s worth it — and the Peacock Alley makes it definitely worth it.

2. Gin Palace, New York City
If you’re a true believer in the gin-only martinis, the Gin Palace is where you need to go — you won’t find a flavored vodka martini anywhere. While the Gin Palace may be best known for its gin and tonic on tap, but we like that you can get a gin martini "your way," (classic, dry, or very dry) as well as the classic Martinez. What makes the Gin Palace the place for a martini is that you’ll get the historically correct martini in a modern, unstuffy atmosphere.

3. Big 4 Restaurant in The Huntington Hotel, San Francisco
Another hotel lobby restaurant for the power types in San Francisco, this is one place you won’t find a chocolate martini — and we love it. You can find the Bond version of the Martini, the Vesper (three parts Gordon’s Gin, one part Absolut Vodka, half measure Lillet Blanc, "shaken" with a lemon peel), as well a Junipero martini that brings out the florals and juniper of a true gin martini. If you need to feel powerful for a short time, Big 4 is the place to go.

4. The Starlight Room in the Sir Francis Drake Hotel, San Francisco
We can appreciate the sense of irony in The Starlight Room’s cocktail menu, a historical account of cocktail history. (Re: the 1980s cocktail portion, called "The Dark Times.") Which makes us appreciate the martini section of the menu that much more: a 50/50 martini of Bombay Sapphire gin and dry vermouth; a Margaurite martini with Plymouth gin, dry vermouth, and orange bitters; and a vodka martini with blanc vermouth. (Don’t worry, the Green Apple Martini is in the Dark Times section.) Sitting 21 stories high with views of the city, the San Francisco spot is known for its over-the-top decadence, so come ready for a night billed for the stars.

5. Nic’s Martini Lounge, Los Angeles
You should be forewarned if you are a gin martini purist: you will not want to go to Nic’s Martini Lounge in Los Angeles. Because Larry Nicola, the owner, is a vodka person (and the creator of the Vodbox, a vodka walk-in freezer in the restaurant). However, that doesn’t mean you won’t find a good, classic vodka martini on the topsy-turvy menu of martinis. The Nic’s Martini (presumably for Nicola) is a straight-up vodka martini with an olive, and then there’s a Maytag Repairman Martini with Chopin Potato vodka and a Maytag blue cheese olive. Sure, there may be a cheesy martini menu and well, a vodka freezer, but we appreciate the enthusiasm and unpretentious air there.

6. Columbia Room, Washington, D.C.
GQ called this bar as the place to have "the best Martini in America" — and we’d have to agree that it's up there. Mixologist Derek Brown is praised by just about everyone for how he mixes up a martini (he even measures the temperature, notes the Wall Street Journal, so that the drink is always served at 30 degrees). It’s the simplicity of the martini that sets up the Columbia Room as a cocktail bar to go down in history.

7. Hank’s Fine Steaks, Las Vegas
Another power-hour sort of hotel restaurant and bar that makes you want that three-martini lunch, or happy hour, or dinner. After all, live tunes from a piano and a killer happy hour? You’ll never say no to that Hank’s dirty martini (with the blue cheese-stuffed olive, of course).

8. Musso & Frank Grill, Los Angeles
If you want to feel like part of old Hollywood, Musso & Frank Grill is where to go. (No, really — this is where Hollywood execs would bring scripts to peruse over a martini.) Named one of the best bars by every men’s magazine ever, Musso & Frank Grill stands by the historical martini. The bartenders are known to even add vermouth to customers' drinks who say they hate the stuff. (After all, what’s a martini without vermouth?) And nothing says old Hollywood glamour like an old-timey martini.


8 American Rums You Should Drink Now

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When people think rum, people usually think about the Caribbean—palm trees, coconut shells and sugar cane fields as far as the eye can see. While its spiritual center most certainly resides in the islands, rum, which technically can be produced anywhere in the world, has an important connection to North America.

Before there was bourbon and rye, there was rum. “North America was producing a ton of rum in the 1700s,” says Fred Minnick, the author of “Rum Curious” (Voyageur Press, $25).

Much of the production was concentrated in New England and the Gulf states. Legend holds that the first North American rum distillery was on Staten Island in 1664, but Minnick says that although there was indeed a distillery on the New York borough, there’s little supporting evidence that it produced rum.

Ships coming from the Caribbean to the Northeast would use molasses as both ballast and trade, according to Maggie Smith, the head distiller for Massachusetts’ Privateer Rum. After the War of 1812, a combination of steep import taxes, the gradual abolishment of the slave trade triangle, and a meteoric rise in the popularity of whiskey in America would soon crowd out the cane-based spirit. It would again be produced, albeit poorly, during Prohibition—hence the term “rum runner.”

The explosion of craft distilling over the past decade includes North American rums, which are in the midst of a renaissance, with labels appearing all over the country, from California to Minnesota to Massachusetts.


Charlie Gitto's is a St. Louis institution, arguably its most famous Italian restaurant. Sure, it may be touristy, but that doesn't mean the food isn't good in fact, locals will tell you that there's no better place for a big platter of Italian-American classics, especially spaghetti and meatballs. Meatballs are perfectly sized and long-simmered until tender, and they're nestled in a bed of al dente spaghetti and topped with house-made Bolognese and a healthy dose of shredded mozzarella before being finished in the oven.


Fried & True : More than 50 Recipes for America's Best Fried Chicken and Sides: A Cookbook

Whether you prefer it cold out of the fridge or hot and crispy on a buttery biscuit, you will find your new favorite fried chicken recipe in Fried & True, serving up more than 50 recipes for America’s most decadently delicious food.

Lee Schrager has left no stone unturned in his quest to find America’s best fried chicken. From four-star restaurants to roadside fry shacks, you’ll learn how to brine your bird, give it a buttermilk bath, batter or even double batter it, season with loads of spices, and fry it up to golden perfection. Recipes to savor include:

-Hattie B’s Hot Chicken
-Yotam Ottolenghi’s Seeded Chicken Schnitzel with Parsley-Caper Mayonnaise
-Marcus Samuelsson’s Coconut Fried Chicken with Collards and Gravy
-Jacques-Imo’s Fried Chicken and Smothered Cabbage
-The Loveless Café’s Fried Chicken and Hash Brown Casserole
-Blackberry Farm’s Sweet Tea–Brined Fried Chicken
-Charles Phan’s Hard Water Fried Chicken
-Thomas Keller’s Buttermilk Fried Chicken
-Wylie Dufresne’s Popeyes-Style Chicken Tenders and Biscuits

Sink your teeth into Fried & True, the source of your next great fried chicken masterpiece and a tribute to America’s most beloved culinary treasure.

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LEE BRIAN SCHRAGER is the founder and director of the Food Network & Cooking Channel South Beach and New York City Wine & Food Festivals. He is also the vice president of corporate communications and national events at Southern Wine & Spirits of America and the author of Fried and True and The Food Network South Beach Wine & Food Festival Cookbook. A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America, Lee has appeared on Today and Rachael Ray, and serves on the board of directors for the Food Bank of New York City. He lives in Miami and New York City.

ADEENA SUSSMAN is a cookbook writer and recipe authority. In addition to this book she also collaborated with Lee Schrager on Fried and True, and is the coauthor of many other cookbooks. Her work has also been published in Food & Wine, The Wall Street Journal, Martha Stewart Living, Every Day with Rachael Ray, and on Epicurious and Food Republic.

EVAN SUNG is a prominent food, lifestyle, and travel photographer based in Brooklyn. His work appears regularly in the New York Times and he has worked on cookbooks with some of the top chefs from around the world.


It all started with a cocktail in the elevator. “A little welcome drink, something for people who weren’t drinking alcohol. That was my creation,” says bartender Julia Momose.

There once was a time when juice was only considered a chaser to vodka, and soda an overly sweet alternative to the good stuff (a.k.a. booze).

Thankfully, for those of us still recovering from the weekend, that’s not the case anymore. Instead, chefs and bartenders are raising the bar for the mocktail. You’ll see what we mean when you stop by these forward-thinking restaurants:


Million-Dollar Country Pâté: A Simple Recipe That Looks (and Tastes!) Like a Million Bucks

Quit loafing around! This Million-Dollar Country Pâté recipe is made with pretty basic stuff, but the results are solid freaking gold: chfstps.co/29PYUmD.
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Video taken from the channel: ChefSteps


The North's Michael Symon Reveals His Mentoring Strategy — America's Best Cook

FN Dish is counting down until the premiere of America's Best Cook on Sunday at 9|8c. On the new show, four Food Network chefs representing the four regions of the United States mentor teams of exceptional home cooks in a competition to find America's best cook. The winner walks away with the title and $50,000 in prize money. But which region will that winner be from? It could be North, South, East or West. The final result will be a testament to the mentor who coached the winner. Ahead of the premiere, FN Dish spoke with each of the mentors to find out more about the competition, mentoring strategies, what makes a good home cook and more.

On America's Best Cook, Michael Symon is representing the North. After growing up in Ohio and opening his restaurant there, Michael has the knowledge and experience to lead his team of home cooks. There are many cultural backgrounds in the region, and Michael's going to make sure that those unique flavors are well represented. Over the years Michael has looked up to Jonathan Waxman as a mentor, and he's hoping to impart to his home cooks that same passion he learned coming up as a chef.

What are some words you'd use to describe the foods of the region you represent?

What type of qualities do you look for in a good home cook?

MS: For me, a good home cook has to be passionate. It's really the same things I look for in a cook starting out at the restaurant: passionate, disciplined and focused. The greatest home cooks, the greatest chefs and restaurant cooks, to me, are people who just love food and immerse themselves in it for the right reasons — because when they feed people they love to see them smile they like their food to bring happiness and bring people together — not because they want to know the next molecular gastronomy trick. I think that people that cook for that reason almost always end up being the best cooks.

As a mentor to these home cooks, what's the best help or advice that you can give?

MS: Trust me. I've been down this road before. Use your instincts as best as you can, and don't be afraid to season your food.

As an Iron Chef, do you have any experience or lessons that you would like to pass on to your home cooks?

MS: When I've judged Next Iron Chef and competed on Iron Chef America, the biggest mistake I've seen made by some of the greatest of chefs and the best chefs I know, in the pressure cooker of competition, is forgetting the basics. They forget to salt, they don't sear the food long enough, they over-fuss with it and they make those mistakes almost every time. So to my team I would say, "Focus on the basics" and "Less is always more."

Coming up as a professional chef, who was your mentor?

MS: The chef that I've always looked up to and has helped mentor me and is now one of my dearest friends is Jonathan Waxman.

What are some words of advice he gave you that you still keep close to you?

MS: The greatest advice he ever gave me was when we opened my first restaurant, Lola, 18 years ago. A week after we opened, I asked him to come in and taste the menu. He tasted every dish on the menu and I asked, "Wax, how is everything?" He said, "If you take one ingredient out of every dish, the menu will be perfect." And it really reinforced for me that less is always more. Nothing should be on a dish unless it makes the dish better. You shouldn't say, "I'm going to put this on for a little bit of color" or "I'm going to put this on because no one else makes it like this." If you focus on the ingredients and the techniques, you're always going to end up with a better dish.

You cook with a Mediterranean influence. Will we see that in this competition?

MS: The Mediterranean influence will come out in this competition. The region where I'm from has an incredibly large eastern European influence, but I was raised by a Greek and Sicilian mother, and I just can't help that. You'll definitely see those comfort foods of the North and the Midwest, but those regions also have a pretty large Mediterranean influence, especially in my family. Where I grew up, I use ingredients from the North in my restaurants, but I cook them with a Mediterranean sensibility. And I think that's what we'll do throughout the show. It would almost be like if Greece or Sicily was in Cleveland, this is the food they would serve. The reason that those cuisines are so great is because they cook food that's only within a 10-mile circumference. That's no different than what we do in the restaurant, and that's what I will try to teach my people on the show.


Where to Find America’s Best Martinis - Recipes

More than 50 Recipes for America's Best Fried Chicken and Sides: A Cookbook

Description

Whether you prefer it cold out of the fridge or hot and crispy on a buttery biscuit, you will find your new favorite fried chicken recipe in Fried & True, serving up more than 50 recipes for America&rsquos most decadently delicious food.

Lee Schrager has left no stone unturned in his quest to find America&rsquos best fried chicken. From four-star restaurants to roadside fry shacks, you&rsquoll learn how to brine your bird, give it a buttermilk bath, batter or even double batter it, season with loads of spices, and fry it up to golden perfection. Recipes to savor include:

-Hattie B&rsquos Hot Chicken
-Yotam Ottolenghi&rsquos Seeded Chicken Schnitzel with Parsley-Caper Mayonnaise
-Marcus Samuelsson&rsquos Coconut Fried Chicken with Collards and Gravy
-Jacques-Imo&rsquos Fried Chicken and Smothered Cabbage
-The Loveless Café&rsquos Fried Chicken and Hash Brown Casserole
-Blackberry Farm&rsquos Sweet Tea&ndashBrined Fried Chicken
-Charles Phan&rsquos Hard Water Fried Chicken
-Thomas Keller&rsquos Buttermilk Fried Chicken
-Wylie Dufresne&rsquos Popeyes-Style Chicken Tenders and Biscuits

Sink your teeth into Fried & True, the source of your next great fried chicken masterpiece and a tribute to America&rsquos most beloved culinary treasure.

Clarkson Potter, 9780770435226, 256pp.

Publication Date: May 20, 2014

About the Author

LEE BRIAN SCHRAGER is the founder and director of the Food Network & Cooking Channel South Beach and New York City Wine & Food Festivals. He is also the vice president of corporate communications and national events at Southern Wine & Spirits of America and the author of Fried and True and The Food Network South Beach Wine & Food Festival Cookbook. A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America, Lee has appeared on Today and Rachael Ray, and serves on the board of directors for the Food Bank of New York City. He lives in Miami and New York City.
 
ADEENA SUSSMAN is a cookbook writer and recipe authority. In addition to this book she also collaborated with Lee Schrager on Fried and True, and is the coauthor of many other cookbooks. Her work has also been published in Food & Wine, The Wall Street Journal, Martha Stewart Living, Every Day with Rachael Ray, and on Epicurious and Food Republic.

EVAN SUNG is a prominent food, lifestyle, and travel photographer based in Brooklyn. His work appears regularly in the New York Times and he has worked on cookbooks with some of the top chefs from around the world.


Where to Find America's Best Mac & Cheese

These 11 restaurants across the country are taking a comfort classic to the next level with cheese-plate-worthy cheese blends, chunks of lobster, spicy chorizo and more. These are macs you won’t want to miss — one’s even served atop a burger.

Photo courtesy of Fifth Group Restaurants

A humble dish of mac and cheese is a Southern staple, but for some, the timeless standard demands a touch of luxury. And what better way to amp things up than chunks of buttery lobster? At South City Kitchen, executive chef Chip Ulbrich offers up two versions of mac and cheese. There’s a four-cheese variety — cream cheese being the wild-card ingredient here. Then, there’s the lobster-enriched offering, in which flavorful lobster meat is folded into the pasta-and-cheese mixture. Dare to indulge in it along with the restaurant’s signature buttermilk fried chicken.

Can’t live without your mac and cheese, but you’re dying for a burger, too? The solution: Marry the burger to the mac and cheese in the form of Boston Burger’s next-level flavor combo, the Mac Attack. In this eatery with three locations in the Boston area, a burger is topped with mac and cheese composed of elbow pasta American, cheddar, Romano and Jack cheeses more cheese sauce and bacon. A dash of hot sauce adds some punch to this cheesy, beefy mouthful.

Photo courtesy of Kuma’s Corner

Heavy metal booms from the speakers at this popular Chicago pub, where the burgers draw raves. But there’s also the spot’s popular build-your-own mac and cheese, a rich blend of three cheeses and cream, topped with a Parmesan panko crust. Then pile on as many as you’d like of about 14 different ingredients, the first two of which are included in the $13 price for the dish. There’s andouille, sun-dried tomatoes, jalapenos and garlic, to name a few. Chase this all down with one of the craft brews and spirits from a rotating selection.

Photo by Hector R. Padilla

There’s often a crushing line at this Santa Monica Italian deli with locals lining up for its epic cold-cut sandwich, the Godmother. But fans of the deli’s baked mac and cheese, consisting of elbow macaroni, eight different cheeses and a topping of crushed garlic croutons, say this decadent dish is also worth the wait. Be careful when ordering, though. Don’t confuse “the real deal mac and cheese” with the deli’s other, simpler side dish of pasta with cheese sauce. Pro tip: Skip the lines and order online for fast pickup at the counter.

At this Southern-themed Miami Beach spot, guests are so devoted to its mac and cheese that some order two in one sitting. The components of this extravagant creation are torchio pasta and five different cheeses — white cheddar, yellow cheddar, Swiss, Gruyère and Parmesan. The dish is then topped with herb-crusted breadcrumbs. As if that weren’t enough gooey goodness, it’s all then smothered in mornay sauce. Chase down all this creaminess with one of the eatery’s more than 60 bourbon offerings.

Photo by Angela DeCenzo ©

This coffee shop-cum-bar in the trendy Queens neighborhood of Astoria has earned kudos for its killer grilled cheese. But equally swoonworthy is the spot’s mac and cheese. This crispy-on-the-outside, gooey-on-the-inside version is composed of Setaro pasta and a three-cheese combo of cheddar, Gruyère and Maplebrook Farm smoked mozzarella. Studded with green beans, the dish is baked in a loaf pan, then cut into slices and finished with a tomato reduction. Pair it with Counter Culture coffee or one of the eatery’s large selections of craft beers.

Photo courtesy of Cochon Restaurant

Porky goodness is a hallmark of this famed NOLA establishment known for its out-of-this-world muffuletta and other tantalizing sandwiches, cured meats and cheeses. But there’s also the spot’s rich and creamy macaroni and cheese, enriched with sharp white cheddar, milk, cream, onion, garlic and hot sauce. It’s all mixed together with elbow macaroni and topped with Parmigiano-Reggiano and herbed breadcrumbs.

Photo courtesy of Valley Shepherd Creamery

Who says mac and cheese has to be made in a casserole? At the Valley Shepherd Creamery stand in Philadelphia’s famed Reading Terminal, the cheese makers’ over-the-top Valley Thunder grilled mac and cheese sandwich with housemade Bubbe’s brisket always draws long lines. The brisket comes from Chef Rebecca Foxman’s grandmother’s recipe and the 12-month-aged cheddar from the creamery’s New Jersey farmstead. There’s no seating at this food stand, but tables and chairs are scattered throughout the market.

Photo courtesy of The Duce

At The Duce, the mac and cheese muffins vie for attention with the restaurant’s theme park atmosphere. Housed in the 1920 warehouse are a boxing ring, an old-time soda fountain and foosball, among other entertainments. The muffins — in which flour binds together elbow macaroni, Gruyère and cheddar into cheesy bites that are then baked in muffin tins — go well with a Pabst or a Bud from the bar’s selection of old-time brews.

When a restaurant says it’s dedicated to “the best food on earth: macaroni and cheese,” it had better deliver the goods. At Oakland’s schoolroom-themed Homeroom, there are more than 10 made-to-order varieties, ranging from a classic cheddar-rich version to the popular Mexican Mac. In that creamy, smoky dish, large ridged elbows are bathed in a sauce of housemade bechamel and Jack cheese, then spiked with Niman Ranch chorizo and chipotle peppers. But why stop there? Customize your mac and cheese with add-ins like caramelized onions or a fried egg. Can’t eat gluten? Most varieties are available gluten-free.


Where to Find America’s Best 2014 Winter Olympics Cocktails

Not to worry, no Molotov cocktails or intolerant politics here. Instead, it’s good will and awesome sportsmanship in a glass at these bars around the country featuring themed winter Olympics cocktails in celebration of the 2014 Sochi games.

Montanya Rum Bar, Crested Butte, Colorado
Drink: The Blunck
When to Drink it: In honor of Crested Butte Olympic skier Aaron Blunck, the cocktail is riff on a classic White Russian. Tune in to the Half Pipe event to cheer the local hometown hero on.
Recipe:
1.5 oz Coffee-Infused Oro
1 oz Platino
1 oz. espresso
1 oz. simple syrup
1 oz. half and half

Daly’s Pub, Montage Deer Valley Hotel, Utah
Drink: Sochi Mule
When to Drink It: Since you’ll probably be spending time most of your time in Utah on the slopes, sip this while picking up some sweet moves from U.S. Olympic athlete and snowboarder Shaun White.
Ingredients: Stoli vodka, lime, basil, mint and ginger beer.

Old Town Social, Chicago
Drink: Torch Shot
When to Drink It: Catch Kate Hansen’s performance at the women’s luge competition. She’s a favorite to win the gold, as she won the World Cup gold medal in women’s luge — the first American to do so in 17 years.
Ingredients: Cinnamon whiskey and caramel vodka poured down an Olympics-themed ice luge.

Polo Lounge, Beverly Hills Hotel, Los Angeles
Drink: Bronze, Silver and Gold Martinis
When to Drink It: Martinis and curling have one thing in common — quality ice is crucial in snagging the gold. Raise your glass to the motley U.S. men’s curling crew composed of normal dudes: a middle-school science teacher, a restaurant manager, an engineer and a college student.
Ingredients: The Bronze is made with Russian Standard Vodka. The Silver is made with Russian Standard Platinum Vodka. The Gold gets Russian Standard Gold Vodka.

WP24, Los Angeles
Drink: Go for Gold
When to Drink It: While watching hometown-favorites Jonathon Quick and Dustin Brown (of the Los Angeles Kings) in hockey and figure-skater Polina Edmonds
Recipe:
1 1/2 oz Stoli Vodka
3/4 oz St. Germain elderflower liqueur
1/2 oz dry vermouth
1/2 oz D’Arbo elderflower syrup
Build in a mixing glass with ice. Shake and strain into a martini glass, and sprinkle with gold flakes or edible gold glitter.

Moran’s Chelsea, NYC
Drink: The Gold Torch
When to Drink It: As the Olympic-torch blazes brightly, either opening or closing ceremonies are the best time to sip on this bourbon-spiked ginger tea.
Recipe:
4 oz ginger tea
1 oz bourbon
Brown sugar for garnish
Honey for sweetener and garnish
Brew the ginger tea as normal in a teapot. While brewing, rim a stemmed glass with honey and brown sugar. After tea is stewed, add in the bourbon. Stir and pour into glass.

Two E Lounge, The Pierre Hotel, NYC
Drink: Five cocktails — each the color of an Olympic ring — including the yellow Triple Salchowm, black Bobsledder and the green Alpine Skier.
When to Drink It: With so many winter sports-themed cocktails to choose from, an all out Olympics-watching marathon is in order.
Ingredients: The Triple Salchow is made with vodka, limoncello, spiced chai tea, fresh-squeezed OJ, steamed milk and white chocolate. In the Bobsledder there is Patron XO Cafe, walnut bitters, Lillet Rouge, Jagermeister Spice and pumpkin spice foam. In the Alpine Skier you get Midori, Ty Ku Junmai Saki, Brugal Especial Rum, honey and chamomile tea.


Watch the video: GLASSES HAUL! Firmoo u0026 Americas Best Eyeglasses (December 2021).