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America's Most Haunted Restaurants Slideshow

America's Most Haunted Restaurants Slideshow

The Savoy Grill, Kansas City, Mo.

The Savoy Grill originally opened in Kansas City's swanky Hotel Savoy in 1903. The restaurant was listed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 1974 and it has hosted four presidents (Harding, Truman, Ford, and Reagan) throughout its illustrious history. However, it is believed that a woman named Betsy Ward, who died while staying in room 505 of the hotel, still haunts The Savoy Grill. Diners and employees have reported strange noises and sightings.

Casey Moore's Oyster House, Tempe, Ariz.

This Irish pub is known for serving up fresh seafood and New England clam chowder. The restaurant's current owner, Patty St. Vincent, claims that during her tenure, all four families that have occupied the house across the street from Casey Moore's have reported seeing a strange woman walking around the upstairs floor late at night. Once, a group of diners allegedly witnessed a piece of art shoot across the restaurant.

The Country House, Stony Brook, N.Y.

The quaint Country House Restaurant, which opened in 1710, is known for its charm (AOL City Guide even voted it the Most Romantic Restaurant on Long Island). According to local lore, one of the original owners, Annette Williamson, has haunted the restaurant for hundreds of years. The paranormal activity at the Country House is so well known that the accounts are included in a book called Ghosts of Long Island.

Stone's Public House, Ashland, Mass.

According to local legend, John Stone, the known curmudgeon who opened Stone's Public House in 1834, has haunted the restaurant since he passed away in 1858. Owners, employees, and patrons have reported strange happenings in the upstairs function room, such as lights flickering on their own, doors refusing to stay locked, and taps turning on by themselves.

The Captain's Anchorage, Big Bear Lake, Calif.

Local lore says that The Captain's Anchorage is haunted by a man named George, who was the bookkeeper of an illegal gambling ring housed in the restaurant during the 1940s. Patrons have reported hovering beer bottles and loud noises coming from the vacant upstairs floor.

One If By Land, Two If By Sea, New York, N.Y.

Located in the carriage house of former Vice President Aaron Burr, it is said that he and his daughter (who mysteriously went missing while on her way to visit her father one day), haunt the restaurant. The story goes that Theodosia Burr's ghost has a tendency to steal the earrings of female diners.

The Bridge Cafe, New York, N.Y.

The historically rich Bridge Cafe is thought to be haunted by a host of former regulars, from pirates to gangsters, but one apparition is particularly well known at the restaurant, a woman named Gallus Mag. Legend has it that Gallus was nearly six feet tall and acted as the bouncer of the restaurant's bar area when it first opened.

Arnaud's, New Orleans

Yelp/Cheri. A G.

Established in 1918, Arnaud’s is a mainstay restaurant of the French Quarter. Various waiters have reported seeing the ghost of an elderly man dressed in a tuxedo standing in the main dining room, who many believe to be Count Arnaud. The witnesses swear that the ghost appears whenever the restaurant is having a particularly busy service.


Take your love of Halloween up a notch by visiting some of the most haunted cities in North America. Luckily, these cities also offer a wealth of other activities just in case you need a break from being scared 24/7.

Spirited Sites

10 Haunted Highways and Byways 10 Photos

Top 10 Places to See Bats Around the World 15 Photos

The Top 10 Most Haunted Hotels in America 10 Photos

Episodes

Most Terrifying Places in America Vol 6

In this hour of Most Terrifying Places in America, we continue our search for the kind of spooky and spine-tingling places that'll make you scream, "Mommy!" We stop by places including a defunct prison where ghosts of the country's worst violent offenders are free to stalk the hallways without chains or bars, and an historic Chicago home that gave birth to the legend of the Devil Baby!

Most Terrifying Places in America Vol 7

Our final hour of Most Terrifying Places in America takes us to even more paranormal hotspots that are guaranteed to haunt your dreams! In this episode, we take you to a range of places from a desecrated cemetery in Illinois where one of the most compelling pieces of paranormal photo evidence was taken, to an eerie theater in Cincinnati built over a mass grave!

Unnatural World

From a Nebraska road where a farmer hung his entire family to an Upstate New York farmhouse where a demon has long overstayed its welcome, we explore locations linked to unnerving and terrifying tales.

Haunted Road Trips

From a Mississippi bridge where a murderer was hanged for his crimes to Savannah's oldest operating hotel built prior to the Civil War, these terrifying roads and haunted roadside spots will make any driver want to lock the doors and roll up the windows.

Devil's Playground

From a Maine movie theater where the horror lurks in the aisles and not on the screen to a Mississippi river where a witch committed her crimes, we explore scary attractions across the nation.

Restless Dead

From a former Victorian-era asylum where victims were experimented on to a remote Nebraska outpost where a scorned woman killed her unfaithful husband, we explore the gravest of locations where the dead never sleep.

Cursed Towns

From a Vermont bridge where a jilted teenage girl leaped to her death to a Tennessee intersection that was a the site of a deadly shoot out, we venture into towns across America haunted by the transgressions of the past.

Most Terrifying Places in America

We're traveling the country in search of the MOST TERRIFYING PLACES IN AMERICA, so get ready to get spooked by first hand encounters with real life ghosts! In this hour we explore the mysteries and legends surrounding seven spine tingling sites. From a grisly unsolved axe murder in a small Midwestern town to the haunted hotel that inspired "The Shining", we take you behind the scenes with the owners, staff and visitors who have had experiences from the beyond! We go into the bowels of a New Orleans cemetery to expose its voodoo secrets and onto the haunted catwalk of a theater where an unfortunate stagehand made his last curtain call. Then, we dare you to spend the night at the most haunted plantation in the country and take a midnight tour of an abandoned penitentiary where a life sentence extends into the afterlife, and a condemned sanatorium where thousands died of tuberculosis. Gathering a team of expert ghost hunters, psychic mediums and historians we reveal just why these paranormal hotspots deserve their reputation as the MOST TERRIFYING PLACES IN AMERICA.

Most Terrifying Places in America 2

Be sure to rest up before watching this show - because after takin in MOST TERRIFYING PLACES IN AMERICA 2, you won't sleep for weeks! In this hour you'll dine with ghosts of lunches past then party with the paranormal at a haunted nightclub - just be sure to get out before last call! Head underground in Portland where unsuspecting folks were held captive and then do your best to not get lost in this wild and crazy mansion that is more like a maze then a home.Plus, the needles are nothing at a haunted tattoo parlor - it's the apparition of the former owner that will scare the pain out of you! And then finish it all up with a tour of what is said to be the most haunted house in the country where numerous deaths took place!Think campfire ghost stories gave you the willies - you ain't seen nothing yet! This is MOST TERRIFYING PLACES IN AMERICA 2!

Most Terrifying Places in America: Vol 3

In this hour of Most Terrifying Places in America, we keep crisscrossing the country to tour even more paranormal hotspots. We visit a castle outside of Seattle that is haunted by a suicidal monk, and an early American Inn near Boston that used to house escaped slaves, but is now home to spirits from the beyond.

Most Terrifying Places in America Vol 4

In this installment of the Most Terrifying Place in America, we visit the deepest, darkest, haunted spots our country has to offer. We explore a bar in Chicago that contains forces so dark it causes visitors to turn horribly violent, and a haunted aircraft carrier in Texas that has earned the nickname "Blue Ghost."

Most Terrifying Places in America Vol 5

In our next installment of the Most Terrifying Place in America, we're continuing our tour of the most goose-bump inducing spots in the country! In our search, we visit an eerie defunct amusement park that delivers a 'thrill' of a different kind, and a private residence so haunted the owner himself can't even sleep there more than a couple times a week!

Most Terrifying Places in America Vol 6

In this hour of Most Terrifying Places in America, we continue our search for the kind of spooky and spine-tingling places that'll make you scream, "Mommy!" We stop by places including a defunct prison where ghosts of the country's worst violent offenders are free to stalk the hallways without chains or bars, and an historic Chicago home that gave birth to the legend of the Devil Baby!

Most Terrifying Places in America Vol 7

Our final hour of Most Terrifying Places in America takes us to even more paranormal hotspots that are guaranteed to haunt your dreams! In this episode, we take you to a range of places from a desecrated cemetery in Illinois where one of the most compelling pieces of paranormal photo evidence was taken, to an eerie theater in Cincinnati built over a mass grave!

Devil's Playground

From a Maine movie theater where the horror lurks in the aisles and not on the screen to a Mississippi river where a witch committed her crimes, we explore scary attractions across the nation.

Cursed Towns

From a Vermont bridge where a jilted teenage girl leaped to her death to a Tennessee intersection that was a the site of a deadly shoot out, we venture into towns across America haunted by the transgressions of the past.

Restless Dead

From a former Victorian-era asylum where victims were experimented on to a remote Nebraska outpost where a scorned woman killed her unfaithful husband, we explore the gravest of locations where the dead never sleep.

Most Terrifying Places in America

We're traveling the country in search of the MOST TERRIFYING PLACES IN AMERICA, so get ready to get spooked by first hand encounters with real life ghosts! In this hour we explore the mysteries and legends surrounding seven spine tingling sites. From a grisly unsolved axe murder in a small Midwestern town to the haunted hotel that inspired "The Shining", we take you behind the scenes with the owners, staff and visitors who have had experiences from the beyond! We go into the bowels of a New Orleans cemetery to expose its voodoo secrets and onto the haunted catwalk of a theater where an unfortunate stagehand made his last curtain call. Then, we dare you to spend the night at the most haunted plantation in the country and take a midnight tour of an abandoned penitentiary where a life sentence extends into the afterlife, and a condemned sanatorium where thousands died of tuberculosis. Gathering a team of expert ghost hunters, psychic mediums and historians we reveal just why these paranormal hotspots deserve their reputation as the MOST TERRIFYING PLACES IN AMERICA.

Most Terrifying Places in America 2

Be sure to rest up before watching this show - because after takin in MOST TERRIFYING PLACES IN AMERICA 2, you won't sleep for weeks! In this hour you'll dine with ghosts of lunches past then party with the paranormal at a haunted nightclub - just be sure to get out before last call! Head underground in Portland where unsuspecting folks were held captive and then do your best to not get lost in this wild and crazy mansion that is more like a maze then a home.Plus, the needles are nothing at a haunted tattoo parlor - it's the apparition of the former owner that will scare the pain out of you! And then finish it all up with a tour of what is said to be the most haunted house in the country where numerous deaths took place!Think campfire ghost stories gave you the willies - you ain't seen nothing yet! This is MOST TERRIFYING PLACES IN AMERICA 2!

Most Terrifying Places in America: Vol 3

In this hour of Most Terrifying Places in America, we keep crisscrossing the country to tour even more paranormal hotspots. We visit a castle outside of Seattle that is haunted by a suicidal monk, and an early American Inn near Boston that used to house escaped slaves, but is now home to spirits from the beyond.


America&rsquos Most Haunted Bars and Restaurants

Here&rsquos one way to ensure a bar will be haunted: open it in a former morgue. That&rsquos the case with Captain Tony&rsquos Saloon in Key West, FL, also a former speakeasy, where you may find yourself sipping gin and tonic next to a grave&mdashor a ghost.

&ldquoGhosts tend to go to places they frequented when they were alive,&rdquo says California-based Loyd Auerbach, author of A Paranormal Casebook: Ghost Hunting in the New Millennium. &ldquoConsequently, places like bars, where people gather for social reasons or for other personal reasons, are often the target sites for the disembodied.&rdquo

Every city seems to have a haunted bar and an intriguing story behind it. The ghostly presence can often be traced back to an erstwhile love affair or, sadly, the result of a grizzly murder. In Austin, TX, the victim of a bar fight has been causing mischief at The Tavern for decades, changing the TV channels or banging dishes in the kitchen. And outside of Las Vegas, a gambler killed when caught cheating still roams the poker tables at Pioneer Saloon.

Still, some ghost tales are taller than others. Jim Fassbinder, who leads ghost tours in San Francisco, says: &ldquoThere&rsquos a bunch of haunted bar stories out there mostly promoted by barkeeps who know a well-told ghost story keeps &rsquoem drinkin&rsquo and gets the barkeep a tip.&rdquo

Not so at Stone&rsquos Public House in Massachusetts, where paranormal experts confirmed eerie happenings the owner had noticed. It&rsquos one of our picks for the most haunted bars in the nation&mdashand you might want to consider a nice tip, after all, if you want to keep the resident spirits happy.


50 States of Cocktails

Learn how to drink like a local by discovering the signature cocktail from each state (including Washington, D.C.).

Related To:

Photo By: Ashley Kelly ©AK PHOTOGRAPHY

Photo By: James Moses ©BisigImpactGroup/j moses

Photo By: The Roosevelt New Orleans, A Waldorf Astoria Hotel ©Copyright (c) 2010 Brian F Huff

Photo By: Nina Gallant ©©Nina Gallant 2015

©Copyright 2016. All rights reserved.

Photo By: Nick Pironio ©Nick Pironio

Photo By: Lara Ferroni ©2013 Lara Ferroni Photography

Photo By: Peter Frank Edwards ©2012

Photo By: Julie Soefer Photography

Photo By: Stacey Jo Rabiger

Photo By: Dan Bishop ©Dan Bishop

Tequila Mockingbird from The Little Donkey: Homewood, Ala.

Iconic author Harper Lee hailed from Alabama, so what better way to toast her iconic Pulitzer Prize-winning novel than with a little liquid inspiration? That classic Southern character takes a wild ride through Mexico with this blanco tequila-based cocktail brightened with pineapple, cardamom, serrano pepper, agave nectar and lime juice.

Smoked Salmon Mary from The Crow’s Nest: Denali Park, Alaska

Alaska&rsquos state fish makes the leap from plate to glass in this explosively savory Bloody Mary. Smoked salmon vodka from Alaska Distillery lends briny undertones, while the house Bloody mix (featuring beef stock, horseradish and plenty of hot sauce) brings the heat. Garnished with smoked salmon strips, this brunchworthy beauty is an ode to the state&rsquos main seafood squeeze.

Photo courtesy of Sean Kennelly

Prickly Pear Margarita from Brittlebush Bar & Grill: Scottsdale, Ariz.

The prickly pear cactus thrives in the Southwest&rsquos desert climate, and its sweet, watermelon-like flavor makes it a prime candidate for infusing cocktail syrups. The proof? This vibrant margarita, bearing reposado tequila, orange liqueur, lime juice and a fuchsia prickly pear syrup that colors the coupe from top to bottom.

Cropduster from Capital Bar & Grill: Little Rock, Ark.

A play on the pale purple Aviation, the Cropduster swaps the old-school creme de violette for housemade blackberry preserves to create a richer, darker descendant. Shaken with Old Tom gin, lemon juice and maraschino liqueur, it calls to mind the rugged little aircraft that soar over Arkansas&rsquo bountiful fields.

Photo courtesy of Tonic Media

Irish Coffee from The Buena Vista Cafe: San Francisco

Pouring nearly 2,000 Irish Coffees each day, The Buena Vista Cafe reigns supreme as master of the cream-capped glass. From the tulip-shaped goblet to the cane-sugar cubes, each element of this time-honored recipe has been tested to achieve the perfect balance of fresh-brewed coffee, Irish whiskey and lightly whipped cream. If you think you hate coffee, you&rsquove clearly never had one of these.

Tree Line from The Avenue Grill: Denver

A veritable wonderland for outdoor recreation, Colorado is perhaps best known for its scenic forests and fresh air. To capture that woodsiness in a drink, the state&rsquos assorted liquor-related guilds hosted the Colorado Cocktail Contest. The Tree Line was the winning entry, a clever composite of local, small-batch whiskey, aromatic alpine herbal liqueur, lemon juice and farmers market cherries. When muddled, it mimics the reddish-purple earth on the Colorado trails.

Photo courtesy of Agata Indiatsi

Hot Buttered Rum from Artisan Restaurant: Southport, Conn.

Connecticut&rsquos unofficial nickname, The Nutmeg State, stems from a bit of a practical joke. During the 19th century, sailors carried the valuable spice from overseas back to Connecticut, where local merchants acquired a reputation for peddling counterfeit nutmeg seeds made of wood. Supposedly, the spicy connotation stuck with the state through the years. Connecticutians aren&rsquot complaining: This steamy mug of rum, spiced butter, brown sugar and nutmeg never gets old.

The Bassett from 1861 Restaurant: Middletown, Del.

Dark, bold and strong of character, this union of rye whiskey, bitter fernet, brown sugar, egg white and walnut bitters represents an important figure in Delaware&rsquos history. It&rsquos named for Richard Bassett, the state&rsquos fourth governor, whose illustrious public career stretched from his time as a captain in the Revolutionary War to his election to the Delaware State Senate and the U.S. Constitutional Convention in 1787. Nice going, Rich.

Papa Dobles from Sloppy Joe’s: Key West, Fla.

Sometimes known as a Hemingway daiquiri, the Papa Dobles is a nod to the peerless American author and his penchant for strong, oversized daiquiris during his time living in Key West. A regular at Sloppy Joe&rsquos throughout the '30s, Hemingway inspired this now-classic blend of light rum, grapefruit and lime juices, and maraschino liqueur.

Nuts & Grains Manhattan from A.Lure: Savannah

Georgia is one of the nation&rsquos top producers of pecans, and the nuts&rsquo earthy, roasted flavor makes them a natural sidekick to rye whiskey, especially in a Manhattan. This version doubles down on that effect by pairing rye and sweet vermouth with pecan-infused vodka and chicory-pecan bitters for a liquid version of your favorite Southern pie.

Tropical Itch from Duke’s Waikiki: Honolulu

You might be more familiar with his ocean-hued Blue Hawaii, but famed Hawaiian bartender Harry Yee also created this tiki classic, playfully garnished with a souvenir backscratcher. Designed to satisfy your urge for an instant island getaway, this transportive glass stars dark rum, vodka, orange curacao, passion fruit juice and a dash of bitters.

The Vesper Reconsidered from Chandlers: Boise, Idaho

The Spud State. Potatonia. The Potato Capital of the World. Let&rsquos face it, Idaho doesn&rsquot mess around when it comes to its trademark cash crop. So when you&rsquove had your fill of fries, consider mixing your spuds with spirits next. At Chandlers, the James Bond-approved Vesper boasts a base of locally made potato vodka balanced with gin, Lillet Blanc and orange bitters.

Southside from The Barrelhouse Flat: Chicago

Hardly anyone can agree on this cocktail&rsquos origin. The most-engaging theory posits that it was born on the South Side of Chicago during Prohibition, when gang members fought for quality liquor sources and often required a barrage of citrus to mask the flavor of inferior booze. Today, no one&rsquos bothered by the refreshing blend of gin, lime juice, mint, sugar and Angostura bitters &mdash it&rsquos still a crowd-pleaser.

Hoosier Heritage from The North End Barbecue & Moonshine: Indianapolis

Known as the Crossroads of America, Indiana has built up a proud state heritage. And you might say that this cocktail forms a similar crossroads, uniting high-quality products like rye whiskey, apple cider, rosemary maple syrup and cayenne pepper from around the country to create one uniquely Midwestern experience.

Photo courtesy of Ashley Kelly

State Fair Shake-Up from Lime Lounge: Des Moines

If you&rsquove ever been to the Iowa State Fair, you&rsquore familiar with its staple beverage: sweet-tart, hand-squeezed lemonade. The only possible improvement to this annual treat? Booze. To create that electric elixir with an adult edge, Lime Lounge shakes fresh-squeezed lemon juice with vodka, sugar, lemon peels and lots of ice to achieve a frothy, dangerously smooth facsimile.

Horsefeather from The Bourgeois Pig: Lawrence, Kan.

Moscow mule enthusiasts will appreciate this simple highball that substitutes rye whiskey for standard vodka. The easy-drinking combination of rye, ginger beer, lemon juice and bitters was created in Kansas during the 1990s and appears to be a riff on the Horse&rsquos Neck. Doubly spicy, thanks to the rye, the Horsefeather is ideal for those who prefer their mule with a stronger kick.

The Seelbach from The Oakroom: Louisville, Ky.

Don&rsquot despair, julep fans. The Seelbach would make any Kentucky native proud, with its sturdy base of Bluegrass State bourbon. Cointreau, Angostura and Peychaud&rsquos bitters and a generous splash of Champagne round out the chic coupe, which has been served at The Seelbach Hotel&rsquos bar since 1907, delighting famous guests like F. Scott Fitzgerald, Al Capone and FDR.

Photo courtesy of James Moses / Bisig Impact Group

Sazerac from The Sazerac Bar: New Orleans

The Big Easy has given birth to a wealth of top-notch cocktails &mdash the Ramos gin fizz, brandy milk punch and Vieux Carré among them &mdash but the one true king will always be the Sazerac. Originally made with Sazerac French brandy when it was invented in the 1850s, the recipe evolved to include rye whiskey and an absinthe rinse, which meld with a cube of sugar and the anise-heavy Peychaud&rsquos bitters that make this a timeless New Orleans classic.

Photo courtesy of The Roosevelt New Orleans, A Waldorf Astoria Hotel

Espresso Martini from Portland Hunt + Alpine Club: Portland, Maine

Ever heard of "The Champagne of Maine?" You might be surprised to learn that the top-selling spirit in the state is Allen&rsquos Coffee-Flavored Brandy, a high-proof brandy infused with Arabica coffee extract. The caffeinated hooch is a regional staple, and while most drinkers pair it simply with milk over ice, cocktail bars are now shaking it into craft creations like this martini made with sweetened coffee concentrate, coffee brandy and white rum.

The Diamondback from Bookmakers: Baltimore

Before Prohibition, Maryland led the nation in rye whiskey production &mdash the house beverage at the Lord Baltimore Hotel&rsquos Diamondback Lounge was this rye cocktail. Some might call its formula aggressive, and they wouldn&rsquot be wrong. The mix of rye whiskey, applejack and Yellow Chartreuse is burly and deeply herbaceous, best suited for nights when a Manhattan simply won&rsquot cut it.

Ward 8 from Yvonne’s: Boston

Invented at Boston&rsquos Locke-Ober Cafe in 1898, the Ward 8 has survived over a century, and is still served across the same hand-carved bar in the space now known as Yvonne&rsquos. While the original recipe was likely a combination of rye whiskey, lemon and orange juices, and grenadine, the modest tweak of splitting the rye with dry sherry brings this classic roaring into the present.

Photo courtesy of Nina Gallant

The Last Word from The Sugar House: Detroit

Don&rsquot call it a comeback: The Last Word has been in the spotlight the past few years, but it&rsquos actually been around since Prohibition. Introduced at the Detroit Athletic Club by a well-known vaudeville star, the quartet of gin, lime juice, maraschino liqueur and Green Chartreuse might seem like a tough sell on paper. Yet somehow, those combative sweet and earthy elements merge into total harmony in the glass.

Tomas Collins from Marvel Bar: Minneapolis

Scandinavian immigrants first began to influence the culture of Minnesota when they started mass-migrating into the state around 1880. Luckily for Minnesota, that meant an infusion of aquavit, the signature caraway-infused Nordic spirit. This play on the Tom Collins highlights local dill aquavit along with housemade pickle brine, lime juice and seltzer, finished with hand-chipped ice.

The Maridel from Parlor Market: Jackson, Miss.

Anyone who&rsquos ever ransacked a honeysuckle bush to seek a few drops of sweet nectar will understand the allure of the crushed-ice concoction the Maridel (a traditional Southern girls&rsquo name). Mississippi-made honeysuckle vodka mingles with lime juice, fresh basil and cucumber syrup to conjure springtime in your hand.

Planter’s House Punch from Planter’s House: St. Louis

You can&rsquot stop by Planter&rsquos House without swigging the famous house drink. Served by the glass, pitcher and punch bowl, this modern translation is based on the centuries-old, easygoing recipe that combined any richly flavored rum with lime juice, sugar and a ton of ice. Bolstered with cognac, aged rum, curacao, grenadine and bitters, today&rsquos version proves that there&rsquos nothing wrong with a little experimentation.

I’ll Be Your Huckleberry from The Ranch at Rock Creek: Philipsburg, Mont.

Visit Montana during midsummer and you&rsquoll catch huckleberry season at its peak. The plump purple gems are abundant in the Rocky Mountains, to the delight of locals and bears alike. Once you&rsquove plucked your share, try the berries in a combination that blends huckleberry vodka and jam with ginger, elderflower liqueur and rhubarb bitters in a delicate coupe.

City of Tom Dennison from The Berry & Rye: Omaha

Don&rsquot mess with "Boss" Dennison. The legendary racketeer reigned over Omaha for 30 years during the early 20th century, controlling many of the city&rsquos politicians, crime rings and bootlegging operations. That said, he also transformed Omaha&rsquos alcohol industry, converting many of the city&rsquos underground saloons into upscale cocktail lounges. For that, you can raise a glass with his namesake draught of bourbon, Suze, apricot liqueur and dry vermouth.

Photo courtesy of Dillon Gitano

Corpse Reviver No. 2 from Herbs & Rye: Las Vegas

After a night of gambling and imbibing on the Strip, an elixir that promises "revival" sounds like just the ticket. Enter the Corpse Reviver cocktails, so named for their power to bring hung-over zombies back to life. The Corpse Reviver No. 2 has achieved fame as the most palatable, with its somewhat magical medley of gin, Lillet Blanc, Triple Sec, lemon juice and a dash of absinthe.

Winter Julep from Firefly Bistro: Manchester, N.H.

Calling all powderhounds: New Hampshire is the ultimate destination for winter thrillseekers, and even established skiing as its state sport in 1998. After a brisk run on the slopes, you deserve the quintessential apres-ski brew, a piping-hot toddy. Firefly&rsquos twist marries belly-warming bourbon with freshly brewed mint tea (a la julep) and sugar, creating a hybrid that delivers the best of both seasons.

The Jack Rose from Colts Neck Inn: Colts Neck, N.J.

Home to America&rsquos first licensed distillery, Laird & Company, New Jersey has been producing its native spirit, applejack, since the 1600s. At one time, the apple-based brandy was made and sold at the Colts Neck Inn, so it&rsquos fitting that the establishment still serves the most-iconic applejack cocktail, the Jack Rose. The rosy trio of applejack, lime juice and grenadine more than stands the test of time.

Agave Way from Secreto Lounge: Santa Fe, N.M.

You&rsquove officially entered chile territory. New Mexico&rsquos dry desert climate has cultivated a vast range of chile pepper varieties, but none so popular as its crisp green chile. Subtly sweet, spicy and smoky, New Mexico&rsquos green chile provides the bold flavor base for this reposado tequila cocktail made with black grapes, lime juice and agave nectar.

Negroni On Tap from Dante: New York

When you consider New York cocktail royalty, the Manhattan&rsquos a given. But one could argue that the globally beloved Negroni &mdash a bittersweet study in equal-parts balance &mdash has snatched the limelight recently. The straightforward trio of gin, Campari and sweet vermouth is so admired that you can order one at nearly every bar in the city, in endless variation. Barrel-aged, carbonated and served on tap, the Negroni has inspired its very own menu at Dante, where The Negroni Sessions celebrate the many imaginative forms this stalwart can inhabit.

Cherry Bounce from Deep South the Bar: Raleigh, N.C.

It&rsquos not often that a cocktail is given credit for establishing a center of government, but it could be the case in North Carolina. Some believe that the Cherry Bounce played a role in persuading the state&rsquos general assembly to adopt Raleigh as the capital. Legend has it that the cherry brandy, the drink of choice at a tavern where lawmakers met during the late 1700s, nudged them in favor of settling in Raleigh. At Deep South, the formula has changed to feature cherry vodka, cranberry and lime juices, and club soda, but the sentiment remains the same.

North Dakota Night Train from Broadway Grill & Tavern: Bismarck, N.D.

"Night train" is the nickname for a type of sweet, inexpensive fortified wine (with a high alcohol content) that inspired the Guns N&rsquo Roses hit of the same name. Intrigued? Try the homegrown version at Broadway Grill & Tavern that merges surprising flavors like local rhubarb wine, cherry liqueur and chokecherry syrup made from North Dakota&rsquos official state fruit.

Jake’s Bloody from The Fairmount: Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Most states have elected milk as their official beverage, so Ohio really shook things up with its choice of tomato juice. What better way to showcase the tangy tomato (for which the state throws a yearly festival) than in a Bloody Mary? An extra-spicy mix of Clamato, horseradish, mesquite seasoning and Sriracha, Jake&rsquos Bloody throws a curveball with the addition of sharp pepperoncini brine.

Stockyard Roots from Ludivine: Oklahoma City

Thanks to its association with the world&rsquos largest cattle market, Oklahoma City is often affectionately referred to as "Cow-Town." So, naturally, the best way to embody all those stomping hooves in a cocktail is to start with hearty bourbon. Pair that dark spirit with a bittersweet root liqueur and honey, plus orange and chocolate bitters, and you&rsquore ready to hit the stockyards, cowboy.

Northwest Mai Tai from Hale Pele: Portland, Ore.

A whopping 99 percent of the country&rsquos hazelnuts are produced in Oregon, and you&rsquod better believe the state knows how to use them. This tiki joint turns up the classic rum mai tai by swapping almond orgeat (the sweet cocktail syrup laced with orange-flower water) with rich, toasty hazelnut orgeat. The addition of farm-fresh mint and local marionberry liqueur tips the scales even further into Pacific Northwest territory.

Philadelphia Fish House Punch from The Olde Bar: Philadelphia

When a recipe has survived nearly three centuries, it&rsquos clear that the creators were onto something. The story goes that some well-to-do Philly Quakers joined together and built a fishing clubhouse on the banks of the Schuylkill River, where they devised this dangerously easy-drinking punch of multiple Jamaican rums, brandy, peach cordial and spiced lemon. It&rsquos rumored that George Washington drank enough of it to give him a three-day hangover.

Coffee Milk from Cook & Brown Public House: Providence

Good luck finding this regional treasure outside of Rhode Island. Coffee milk is the official state drink, and the comforting duo of milk and sweet coffee syrup has been a favorite since the 1930s, with fans likening its influence to that of the New York egg cream. Cook & Brown boosts the G-rated original with a bit of blackstrap rum, cold-brew coffee, half-and-half and vanilla simple syrup.

Charleston Light Dragoon’s Punch from Husk: Charleston, S.C.

Resurrected from the archives of the Charleston Preservation Society, this antique punch has proven to be one of the most-popular drinks atHusk. The name refers to a Civil War-era military unit that supposedly spent more time partying than fighting. The good news is that they knew how to make a cocktail, and this cup of Jamaican rum, multiple brandies, lemon juice and black tea (the state hospitality drink) is proof.

Photo from Heritage by Sean Brock (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2014. Taken by Peter Frank Edwards.

Desert Heat from Vertex Sky Bar: Rapid City, S.D.

There&rsquos more to South Dakota than Mount Rushmore. With three distinct regions, the state is home to both tree-covered mountain ranges and semi-arid badlands, with varying climates to match. To capture this dual quality of the state&rsquos parched desert heat and howling-cold winter, this tequila cocktail adds jalapenos for intensity and cucumbers to cool the lingering spice, tempered with lime juice and simple syrup.

Tennessee Mojito from Merchants Restaurant: Nashville

Its rolling hills and warm breezes make Tennessee a prime location for peach orchards &mdash and those peaches have been known to roll right into the hands of regional spirit makers. Prichard&rsquos peach and mango rum is a hometown favorite that Merchants puts to work in a cool Southern Mojito with lime juice and fresh mint. Sip it on the porch in place of your usual sweet tea.

Photo courtesy of Ashley Hylbert

Frozen Margarita from The Pastry War: Houston

There&rsquos no shortage of slushy margaritas once you hit the Texas border &mdash the margarita is the state&rsquos most-popular cocktail, thanks to the subtropical temperatures. But to find the version that leads the pack, head straight for the esteemed Pastry War, where blanco tequila is brightened by both Key and Persian lime juices, sweetened with agave nectar and rimmed with citrus salt. You won&rsquot look back.

Photo courtesy of Julie Soefer Photography

Salt Lake Spritz from Pallet Bistro: Salt Lake City

In a state where beers above 4 percent ABV are considered liquor and a cocktail&rsquos primary spirit is limited to one-and-a-half ounces, the breezy, low-alcohol spritz can be ubiquitous. Pallet&rsquos variation marries tart cranberry juice, maraschino liqueur, orange bitters and Prosecco, a fusion that&rsquos light and bubbly enough that you can tell the bartender to keep &rsquoem coming.

Photo courtesy of Stacey Jo Rabiger

Vermont Martini from Ye Olde Tavern: Manchester, Vt.

Visiting the Green Mountain State during sugaring season? You&rsquove hit the maple jackpot. As the nation&rsquos leading producer of the sticky-sweet syrup, Vermont is renowned for its maple-infused treats. But after you&rsquove dribbled it all over your pancakes, stop in to this Colonial-era tavern to see the state&rsquos liquid gold shine in a no-frills martini featuring local Vermont vodka distilled from whey and 100 percent pure maple syrup.

Captain Marryat Julep from Julep’s: Richmond

Get ready to wrap your hands around one of the oldest recorded julep recipes. Though most often associated with Kentucky, the julep was most likely invented in Virginia, where it was prepared with brandy instead of bourbon. An Englishman named Captain Marryat was touring the U.S. in the 1800s when he discovered the refreshing beauty of the julep. This recipe follows his original blueprint: apple and peach brandy, fresh mint and simple syrup over a mountain of crushed ice.

Barrel Aged Raincoat from Local 360: Seattle

Looking for a reprieve from that damp Seattle drizzle? Cozy up with a wintry cocktail that celebrates the Evergreen State&rsquos exceptional homegrown spirits. House barrel-aged moonshine and dark walnut liqueur tangle with maple syrup and chocolate bitters to create the liquid equivalent of a thick flannel blanket.

Sheeney’s Rickey from Teddy & The Bully Bar: Washington, D.C.

The Rickey looms large over D.C.&rsquos drinking scene, especially since it was instated as the District&rsquos official cocktail in 2011. Created in the 1880s at Shoomaker&rsquos Bar, the simple highball typically features gin or bourbon, half a lime and seltzer. Teddy & The Bully takes a new-age approach, pairing D.C. gin with a sweet bourbon reduction and floating a zesty lime foam over the surface. Bubbly, aromatic and gently acidic, it gives the original a run for its money.

Black Walnut Manhattan from Bridge Road Bistro: Charleston, W. Va.

Fall is prime time to experience the bounty of West Virginia&rsquos black walnut harvest. The annual Black Walnut Festival is a treasure trove of nutty spectacles, from baking contests to flea markets that salute the state specialty. While enjoying the festivities, don&rsquot forget to slurp a few special Manhattans made with West Virginia bourbon, spiced walnut liqueur and black walnut bitters.

Brandy Old Fashioned from Bryant’s Cocktail Lounge: Milwaukee

Order an Old Fashioned in Wisconsin and you might be in for a surprise. Out-of-staters will likely expect to receive rye whiskey or bourbon, but Wisconsin custom dictates the use of brandy instead. Local tastes run sweet, so you&rsquoll find that brandy topped with sugar, bitters and Sprite, but you can always adjust your order by saying "sweet, sour or press," which tells the bartender that you want Sprite, Squirt or half-Sprite, half-seltzer.

Photo courtesy of Dan Bishop

Howitzer from The Rose: Jackson, Wyo.

Yee-haw! When in cowboy country, do as the locals do &mdash and name your punch after a historic artillery piece. Inspired by the Chatham Artillery Punch from Charles H. Baker (the 19th-century American author known for his cocktail prowess), the Howitzer packs some heat with its rousing blend of rye whiskey, cognac, red wine, cinnamon and bitters. Plus, you can choose your own Wild West adventure and try it hot or cold.


The Middleton Tavern, Annapolis, Maryland

The Middleton Tavern was established in 1750, and has played host to many of the Founding Fathers: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Ben Franklin all counted themselves as fans of the cuisine, and both luminaries and locals liked to eat and spend time there. Apparently, a few still do. According to the website Ghost Eyes , run by a group of Central Virginia paranormal investigators, there's a Revolutionary War soldier who keeps the waitstaff on their toes by toppling tables and tossing about dishes if they sit too long. Another specter likes to turn the wall lamps upside down, and one old 18th-century sailor has been known to stand outside the building, staring disconsolately out to sea.


The Lizzie Borden Bed and Breakfast in Fall River, Massachusetts, was the site of a grisly murder.

Now a museum and a bed and breakfast, the Lizzie Borden house was the scene of the gruesome murders of Andrew and Abby Borden, who were found in 1892 covered in blood and beaten to death with an ax. Lizzie, the Bordens' daughter, was the prime suspect in the case.

The charges against Lizzie were later dropped due to lack of physical evidence, and no one else was ever charged with the murders — the case remains unsolved. Today, guests can stay in the room where Abby was killed.

According to employees and visitors, the home is full of paranormal activity such as an apparition in Victorian clothing and sounds of weeping, doors opening and closing, footsteps, and conversations in empty rooms.


A Dark and Stormy Bite: Rip a keg stand with the dead at America’s most haunted brewery

Welcome, foolish mortals, to the home of cadaverous casseroles, exsanguinous eats, and snack-related sagas so strange and frightening they may well transport you to a realm unknown. Welcome, readers, to A Dark and Stormy Bite , a monthly column that dives deep into a teeth-chattering culinary dimension of utterly ghoulish proportions. Basically, if it involves food and goes bump in the night, we’ll cover it here. Do you have a favorite haunted restaurant or cursed recipe? Email [email protected]—and beware.

Gather ’round, my fellow insatiable succubi! Throw back a cold one, ye spectral party animals, for I have a positively bitchin’ yarn that’ll scare your lederhosen clean off. For this month’s column, we’re sucking down a killer lager at the stately Lemp Mansion and the nearby Lemp Brewery, both of which are said to be some of the most haunted spots in North America. Hold onto your steins.

Our journey begins in St. Louis in 1838. That’s when one Johann Adam Lemp arrived from Eschwege, Germany, to seek his fortune as a grocer/brewer. St. Louis Magazine explains that Lemp learned the art of brewing lager from his father back in Germany and used that knowledge to open a St. Louis brewery in 1840. Was he the first German to bring lager to the U.S.? Unclear. While John Wagner is credited with bringing the first lager yeast stateside, Lemp may have smuggled in his own yeast just a few years earlier. Either way, the brewery skyrocketed to success. Lemp passed the operation on to his son William , who succeeded his father as the head of the brewery before spawning eight little beer barons of his own.

By 1870, Lemp was the largest brewery in St. Louis. The Lemp family had secured its place among the Midwestern elite, especially after marrying off their daughter Hilda to Gustav Pabst —yes, of the Milwaukee Pabst family—in 1897. But only a few years later, tragedy struck the house of Lemp. Theirs became a story of untouchable wealth, lavish eccentricity, salacious scandal, disastrous losses, and death after untimely death.

One could argue that the tragic part of the saga kicked off in 1901 when Frederick, William’s favorite son and heir apparent to brewery leadership, died of heart failure at only 28. Three years later, William Sr. shot himself in the head in a bedroom in the family mansion. The family battled scandalous whispers about divorce, violence, and illicit cockfighting until 1919, when Prohibition closed the brewery permanently shortly after in 1920, William’s glamorous youngest daughter, Elsa , took her own life with a gunshot to the chest.

Things got worse in 1922, when the once-magnificent Lemp brewery was sold at auction to the International Shoe Co. Most of the company’s assets were liquidated, although the Lemps continued to live in the nearby mansion. Shortly after presiding over the sale of the brewery, William Lemp Jr. shot himself . Finally, in 1949, his brother Charles Lemp committed suicide in his bedroom in the mansion after shooting his dog in the basement. Here’s a chilling tidbit: Charles was the only Lemp to leave a suicide note. “In case I am found dead,” he wrote, “blame it on no one but me.”

With so much tragedy tearing through one family, it makes sense that the house and brewery property might have some funky juju. Indeed, paranormal investigators can’t get enough of the place. In this video , historian Betsy Burnett-Belanger insists that the mansion is home to nine identifiable spirits, including one fetid character she calls “the stinky man.” Local paranormal junkies also went semi-viral after sharing a video of an apparition they called “the lady in white.” Lemp Mansion even welcomed the Ghost Adventures team during the show’s ninth season.

Making matters exponentially creepier, the mansion and brewery are connected by a series of underground tunnels and caverns, part of the legendary Caves of St. Louis . The cave system was reportedly the perfect temperature for aging beer, although it also served as a handy way for the Lemps to get to work each morning. Now, it’s home to—you guessed it—a wickedly gauche haunted house. The haunted house is operated by the St. Louis-based company Halloween Productions , with the following warning to potential visitors:

“The all-new Lemp Brewery Haunted House is ready to make you scream. House of Occult located deep underground where NO ONE CAN HEAR YOU SCREAM. Come face to face with demons, confusing mazes, inside a pitch black cavern of the occult. Lemp Brewery is the most famous haunted place in American [sic] prepare to go into the abyss to scream.”

Yes, readers, someone has taken this very old, very stately property and transformed it with “state of the art animations, sets, props, sound effects and special effects,” highlighting the brewery’s “old rusty pipes and worn down machines from a time long ago.” There’s nothing creepier than worn-down brewing equipment, I guess. The 20,000-square-foot attraction also features “tens of thousands of dollars [worth of] monsters, dead zombie gangsters, a massive animated alligator, creepy rats, bats, and long lost brewery workers of the dead.”

If you’re put off by the idea of dead zombie gangsters and a massive animated alligator, you can take the slightly classier approach and tour the mansion with the help of Betsy Burnett-Belanger, the aforementioned historian and paranormal expert. For the low, low price of 25 bucks (plus tax and handling fees), you can get yourself a tour that concludes with a “dark room session” during which Burnett-Belanger will “attempt to make psychic communication.”

And there you have it: an American story in three parts. Immigrant family achieves awe-inspiring beer fame immigrant family suffers half a century of tragic losses fueled by vicious speculation and a hefty dose of untreated mental illness Midwestern charlatans capitalize off said tragedy and install a massive animated alligator on the property. Today, the real ghoul appears to be. capitalism. It’d be great if I could turn into a bat and fly away after making that statement, but I’m writing this from my couch. Also, this is the internet, which means you can’t see me. Picture me turning into a bat, okay? Boom. Bat.


The Top 10 Most Haunted Hotels in America

Spend a night with some legendary ghosts — Marilyn Monroe and Sid Vicious, to name a few — in the country's most famous haunted hotels.

Related To:

The Hollywood Roosevelt

Marilyn Monroe is thought to be one of many restless spirits that haunt Hollywood's glamorous Hotel Roosevelt, where she lived for two years while her modeling career was taking off. Other reports of cold spots, photographic orbs and mysterious phone calls to the hotel operator add to its mystique.

La Fonda on the Plaza

The spirits of Santa Fe's Old West are said to inhabit La Fonda's lobby and bar, including the Honorable John P. Slough who was shot to death in the hotel lobby and a distraught salesman who leaped to his death outside the gambling hall.

The Stanley Hotel

Colorado's Stanley Hotel spooked horror master Stephen King and inspired the setting for "The Shining." Want to go on your own "spooky sojourn?" Brave one of the hotel's ghost tours, including a five-hour ghost hunt and popular night tour.

Logan Inn

Built in 1722 as a tavern, the Logan Inn and its spirits are legendary in the Colonial-era town of New Hope, Pa. Aspiring ghost hunters should request Room 6, also known as Emily's Room. The mother of a former owner of the building, Emily's lavender perfume and soft crying at night have been detected by guests.

The Equinox

Constructed in 1769, The Equinox in Vermont was a favorite of Abe Lincoln's family and is said to be haunted by Honest Abe's beloved wife, Mary Todd Lincoln.

Peter Shields Inn

Cape May is a picturesque beach town on the Jersey Shore, but inside many of the town's stately Victorian homes are restless spirits looking for peace. The Peter Shields Inn, a boutique inn and upscale restaurant, is one of these haunted spots. Visitors have said they've felt the overwhelming presence of a number of ghostly spirits, including the real-estate developer Peter Shields and his teenage son who is said to roam the inn's basement.

The Queen Mary

A 1930's cruise liner that's docked in Long Beach, Calif., the Queen Mary offers numerous ghost-hunting tours and paranormal investigations onboard for its guests. It became known as "the haunted ship" after numerous disasters, including a split hull that left few survivors.

Crescent Hotel and Spa

Guests have reported strange occurrences and sightings while staying in the Crescent Hotel, in Eureka Springs, Ark. Its newest tour allows guests to hear Ozark Mountain ghost stories around a flickering campfire and visit the morgue at midnight.

Hotel Provincial

Guests at New Orleans' Hotel Provincial, a former Confederate hospital, have reported sightings of Civil War soldiers and surgeons as well as bloodstains appearing and disappearing on the bedding of some rooms.

Hotel Chelsea

There are plenty of famous guests and ghosts at New York's Hotel Chelsea, including Dylan Thomas (who died of pneumonia while staying here in 1953) and Sid Vicious. Punk rock icon Vicious and his girlfriend Nancy Spungen were staying at the hotel when she was found dead from a stab wound in 1978. Vicious was charged with her murder, but died of an overdose before his trial began. The hotel itself came to the end of the road in 2011 when it was closed for renovations. It has yet to reopen.


Bermuda

The legendary Bermuda Triangle is blamed for the disappearance of many ships and aircraft. There is some truth behind this as the area is a high-traffic shipping lane that is also plagued by hurricanes, meaning the island is surrounded by many shipwrecks. Visitors can scuba dive or snorkel among some of these submerged ships. Aside from vessels, the spirits of many former sailors still haunt the 400-year-old island's shores. In St. George, the ghost of a real-life pirate of the Caribbean named Captain George Dew haunts his former home, while a whaleboat captain named Old Morgan hovers over the island like a raincloud on certain days.


The Scariest Places in America

Visit a spooky, frightful destination that will haunt you long after you're home.

Related To:

St. Louis Cemetery No. 1 | New Orleans

St. Louis Cemetery, established in New Orleans in 1789, is Louisiana's oldest and most haunted. More than 100,000 souls are buried here, some in decaying crypts. Visitors often encounter the ghost of Marie Laveau, the Voodoo Queen of the 1800s. Be respectful if you encounter her she's said to pinch and shove non-believers. Ghosts from yellow fever epidemics and Civil War battles may also stalk the grounds. A licensed guide must accompany you if you visit going alone probably isn't wise anyway.

Charter Street Cemetery | Salem, Mass.

For centuries, Americans have believed in the supernatural. In 1692, curses and cries rang through the streets of Salem, Mass., when a strange hysteria led to accusations of witchcraft. Twenty men and women were executed, and some say their wronged souls still haunt the community. In Salem's House of Seven Gables, a seaside mansion built in 1668, visitors report eerie occurrences, like a rocking chair that rocks by itself. More than 250,000 people arrive each October for the town's Haunted Happenings, which include costume balls, ghost tours, a live reenactment of a witchcraft trial and more. Note: Charter Street Cemetery/Old Burying Point will be closed for conservation work through November 2, 2019.

Sleepy Hollow | N.Y.

Don't lose your head in Sleepy Hollow, a quaint New York village described in writer Washington Irving's story, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. In Irving's tale, a Headless Horseman, seeking the head he lost in the Revolutionary War, often rode through the countryside at night, thundering over a bridge and past a little church. Look for the apparition when you tour the town's 18th-century Philipsburg Manor or the local cemetery.

The Stanley Hotel | Estes Park, Colo.

Don't be fooled by The Stanley Hotel's magnificent setting and beautiful rooms. The property, in Estes Park, Colo., inspired author Stephen King's terrifying novel, The Shining, after he and his wife stayed there just before its annual winter closing. King had nightmares about his then three-year-old son screaming as something chased him through the long, empty halls. Do your own chasing&mdashor escaping&mdashwhen you take a Night Tour through the hotel, now more than 100 years old. Other ghosts play piano in the concert hall after dark or hang out in an underground cave system formerly used by construction crews.

Winchester Mystery House | San Jose, Calif.

After the 1881 death of William Wirt Winchester, founder of Winchester Firearms, his widow, Sarah, used her huge inheritance to construct a bizarre home. Until she died in 1922, she hired workers to install doors that went nowhere, stairs that led to the ceiling, secret rooms and other oddities. Today, the house is a bewildering maze of 160 rooms. Many think she was trying to escape the angry ghosts of those killed by her husband's guns. Now known as the Winchester Mystery House, as seen on Ghost Adventures, the home is located in San Jose, Calif.

The Historic Bullock Hotel | Deadwood, S.D.

Where else would you expect to find the haunted Bullock Hotel other than in Deadwood, S.D.? It was the town's first hotel, and it's still a favorite haunt of the town's first sheriff, Seth Bullock, who died in 1919. His spirit supposedly flicks lights on and off in the basement and rattles dishes and glasses in the restaurant. He was a law-abiding man, so maybe he's just trying to chase off more malevolent ghosts.

Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast | Fall River, Mass.

No one knows who killed wealthy Andrew Borden and his wife in 1892. An old rhyme pins the axe murders on their daughter, Lizzie, but did the unmarried Sunday school teacher really do it? After a jury set her free, Lizzie sold the Victorian home. Today, it's the Lizzie Borden Bed and Breakfast. Guests sometimes flee in the middle of the night after seeing doors open and close without human help or after spotting shadows climbing the stairs.

Gettysburg National Military Park | Gettysburg, Pa.

In 1863, Confederate and Union forces fought for three terrible days at Gettysburg, Pa., until some 50,000 lay dead or wounded. Today, Gettysburg National Military Park is said to echo with the cries and whispers of their phantoms. One of the most horrifying stories in the area comes from two Gettysburg College administrators. One night, the men claim, they took an elevator to the first floor of a building called Pennsylvania Hall. Instead of stopping there, the elevator descended to the basement, where the doors opened to reveal a blood-splattered Civil War operating room. If you go, perhaps you should take the steps.

The Myrtles Plantation | St. Francisville, La.

It's hard to believe Louisiana's elegant Myrtles Plantation, built in 1796 and listed on the National Historic Register, harbors ghosts in its spacious rooms. But in 1992, a National Geographic Explorer team allegedly shot a photo of a ghostly girl on the grounds a building behind her was visible through her translucent form. Other legends say 10 or more people were poisoned, hung or otherwise murdered here. Take an evening mystery tour to search for specters, or look into the plantation's haunted mirror, said to hold trapped spirits.