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Washington, DC New Menu Report: 1/13/16

Washington, DC New Menu Report: 1/13/16

Winter literally blew in with force this week and we can’t think of a better way to escape the elements than to sidle up to the bar and order a few inventive craft cocktails. While those get your juices flowing, consider a Texas size brunch with Mexican specialties to keep things interesting, or take your furry friend for a walk and get breakfast for both of you at quaint French boulangerie. Aren’t we continental?

Blue Duck at Park Hyatt Washington
Washingtonians never tire of a well made cocktail and Blue Duck Lounge’s bartender, Alex Gordon, has created some fantastic new cocktails available exclusively at available exclusively at Blue Duck Lounge and Blue Duck Tavern through the end of February. Her new menu includes seven seasonal cocktails, two after-dinner drinks, and one mocktail and they are all perfect to get cozy with on a cold winter’s night. Celebrate the DMV with The Montrose made with Ivy City gin, local honey, fresh lemon juice, lavender bitters, and Thibaut Janisson Blanc de Blancs Brut NV from Charlottesville, Virginia. After dinner, get toasty with the Chartreuse hot toddy made with green Chartreuse, genmaicha-infused gin, toasted cardamom, and lime. It’s the only way to say, “Bon nuit!”

L'Hommage Bistro Français
Juste pour les chiens this winter, executive chef Joshua Perkins L'Hommage Bistro Français has literally let his kitchen go to the dogs. He’s debuting a new breakfast special just for dog walkers and their furry canine friends. Between 7 and 11:00 a.m. you can stop by the boulangerie for a baked croissant of your choice, order a 16-ounce coffee, and when you do you’ll receive a complimentary house-baked biscuit for le petit pooch. The offer is available daily for $4 through March 31st and the ample outdoor patio provides seating year round to take a break and enjoy the treat.

Texas Jack’s Barbecue
Brunch is coming to Texas Jack’s Barbecue in Arlington, so git along you little doggies and head over for their first brunch service on Saturday, January 16, and then head back again on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Monday, January 18. Their new brunch menu will be served from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in the main dining room. You’ll find brunch classics, Mexican specialties, and of course slow smoked meat that falls off the bone. You gotta try executive chef Matt Lang’s brisket hash topped with eggs, the huevos rancheros wit choice of pulled pork or brisket, or shrimp and grits. Satisfy your sweet tooth with French toast or go old school and order eggs, bacon, and biscuits.

Summer Whitford is the D.C. Editor at The Daily Meal and also writes about food, drink, and travel. Follow her on Twitter @FoodandWineDiva, on Instagram at thefoodandwinediva, and read more of her stories here.


A very big problem I see with most restaurants is that they describe their menu items with a lifeless list of ingredients. This is unfortunate, because menu descriptions allow you to share the heart and soul of your restaurant with customers and can have a defining impact on a restaurant&rsquos reputation and profits. They really are that important. In particular, they can positively impact your restaurant in the following ways:

1. Menu descriptions allow a restaurant to differentiate itself

Strong menu descriptions take a dish out of the realm of being a commodity and make it appear better than a similar dish being sold by a competitor across the street. A good description won&rsquot compensate for bad food, of course, but when customers believe that you are offering something distinctive, something that they can&rsquot get anywhere else, your restaurant reaps the benefits through increased traffic and guests&rsquo perception that the dish&rsquos price is more justified.

2. Good menu descriptions entice guests, leading to repeat business

When tempting language makes three entrees seem irresistible, customers will order one of them and possibly return two more times to try the other two on future visits.

3. Good menu descriptions lead guests to order more items at a given sitting

Customers typically spend just 90 seconds looking over the menu, and this time does not expand to accommodate any confusion caused by a poorly written menu. Good descriptions require less work (e.g., reading, searching) from the customer, and less confusion or searching during the item-selection process means customers have more time within those 90 seconds to find and add additional items to their order.

Now that you know the importance of how you present your restaurant&rsquos offerings to the world, I will teach you how to describe them to your customers. All of the information I present applies to all types of food establishments, from high-end restaurants to hotdog stands to food trucks. And note that it is important to adjust the language you use to suit your particular audience. While reading, please keep in mind that each piece of information below addresses one or more of the three positive impacts listed above: it differentiates your dish, entices your customers to order your dish, and/or makes it easier for customers to find and order more of what they want.


A very big problem I see with most restaurants is that they describe their menu items with a lifeless list of ingredients. This is unfortunate, because menu descriptions allow you to share the heart and soul of your restaurant with customers and can have a defining impact on a restaurant&rsquos reputation and profits. They really are that important. In particular, they can positively impact your restaurant in the following ways:

1. Menu descriptions allow a restaurant to differentiate itself

Strong menu descriptions take a dish out of the realm of being a commodity and make it appear better than a similar dish being sold by a competitor across the street. A good description won&rsquot compensate for bad food, of course, but when customers believe that you are offering something distinctive, something that they can&rsquot get anywhere else, your restaurant reaps the benefits through increased traffic and guests&rsquo perception that the dish&rsquos price is more justified.

2. Good menu descriptions entice guests, leading to repeat business

When tempting language makes three entrees seem irresistible, customers will order one of them and possibly return two more times to try the other two on future visits.

3. Good menu descriptions lead guests to order more items at a given sitting

Customers typically spend just 90 seconds looking over the menu, and this time does not expand to accommodate any confusion caused by a poorly written menu. Good descriptions require less work (e.g., reading, searching) from the customer, and less confusion or searching during the item-selection process means customers have more time within those 90 seconds to find and add additional items to their order.

Now that you know the importance of how you present your restaurant&rsquos offerings to the world, I will teach you how to describe them to your customers. All of the information I present applies to all types of food establishments, from high-end restaurants to hotdog stands to food trucks. And note that it is important to adjust the language you use to suit your particular audience. While reading, please keep in mind that each piece of information below addresses one or more of the three positive impacts listed above: it differentiates your dish, entices your customers to order your dish, and/or makes it easier for customers to find and order more of what they want.


A very big problem I see with most restaurants is that they describe their menu items with a lifeless list of ingredients. This is unfortunate, because menu descriptions allow you to share the heart and soul of your restaurant with customers and can have a defining impact on a restaurant&rsquos reputation and profits. They really are that important. In particular, they can positively impact your restaurant in the following ways:

1. Menu descriptions allow a restaurant to differentiate itself

Strong menu descriptions take a dish out of the realm of being a commodity and make it appear better than a similar dish being sold by a competitor across the street. A good description won&rsquot compensate for bad food, of course, but when customers believe that you are offering something distinctive, something that they can&rsquot get anywhere else, your restaurant reaps the benefits through increased traffic and guests&rsquo perception that the dish&rsquos price is more justified.

2. Good menu descriptions entice guests, leading to repeat business

When tempting language makes three entrees seem irresistible, customers will order one of them and possibly return two more times to try the other two on future visits.

3. Good menu descriptions lead guests to order more items at a given sitting

Customers typically spend just 90 seconds looking over the menu, and this time does not expand to accommodate any confusion caused by a poorly written menu. Good descriptions require less work (e.g., reading, searching) from the customer, and less confusion or searching during the item-selection process means customers have more time within those 90 seconds to find and add additional items to their order.

Now that you know the importance of how you present your restaurant&rsquos offerings to the world, I will teach you how to describe them to your customers. All of the information I present applies to all types of food establishments, from high-end restaurants to hotdog stands to food trucks. And note that it is important to adjust the language you use to suit your particular audience. While reading, please keep in mind that each piece of information below addresses one or more of the three positive impacts listed above: it differentiates your dish, entices your customers to order your dish, and/or makes it easier for customers to find and order more of what they want.


A very big problem I see with most restaurants is that they describe their menu items with a lifeless list of ingredients. This is unfortunate, because menu descriptions allow you to share the heart and soul of your restaurant with customers and can have a defining impact on a restaurant&rsquos reputation and profits. They really are that important. In particular, they can positively impact your restaurant in the following ways:

1. Menu descriptions allow a restaurant to differentiate itself

Strong menu descriptions take a dish out of the realm of being a commodity and make it appear better than a similar dish being sold by a competitor across the street. A good description won&rsquot compensate for bad food, of course, but when customers believe that you are offering something distinctive, something that they can&rsquot get anywhere else, your restaurant reaps the benefits through increased traffic and guests&rsquo perception that the dish&rsquos price is more justified.

2. Good menu descriptions entice guests, leading to repeat business

When tempting language makes three entrees seem irresistible, customers will order one of them and possibly return two more times to try the other two on future visits.

3. Good menu descriptions lead guests to order more items at a given sitting

Customers typically spend just 90 seconds looking over the menu, and this time does not expand to accommodate any confusion caused by a poorly written menu. Good descriptions require less work (e.g., reading, searching) from the customer, and less confusion or searching during the item-selection process means customers have more time within those 90 seconds to find and add additional items to their order.

Now that you know the importance of how you present your restaurant&rsquos offerings to the world, I will teach you how to describe them to your customers. All of the information I present applies to all types of food establishments, from high-end restaurants to hotdog stands to food trucks. And note that it is important to adjust the language you use to suit your particular audience. While reading, please keep in mind that each piece of information below addresses one or more of the three positive impacts listed above: it differentiates your dish, entices your customers to order your dish, and/or makes it easier for customers to find and order more of what they want.


A very big problem I see with most restaurants is that they describe their menu items with a lifeless list of ingredients. This is unfortunate, because menu descriptions allow you to share the heart and soul of your restaurant with customers and can have a defining impact on a restaurant&rsquos reputation and profits. They really are that important. In particular, they can positively impact your restaurant in the following ways:

1. Menu descriptions allow a restaurant to differentiate itself

Strong menu descriptions take a dish out of the realm of being a commodity and make it appear better than a similar dish being sold by a competitor across the street. A good description won&rsquot compensate for bad food, of course, but when customers believe that you are offering something distinctive, something that they can&rsquot get anywhere else, your restaurant reaps the benefits through increased traffic and guests&rsquo perception that the dish&rsquos price is more justified.

2. Good menu descriptions entice guests, leading to repeat business

When tempting language makes three entrees seem irresistible, customers will order one of them and possibly return two more times to try the other two on future visits.

3. Good menu descriptions lead guests to order more items at a given sitting

Customers typically spend just 90 seconds looking over the menu, and this time does not expand to accommodate any confusion caused by a poorly written menu. Good descriptions require less work (e.g., reading, searching) from the customer, and less confusion or searching during the item-selection process means customers have more time within those 90 seconds to find and add additional items to their order.

Now that you know the importance of how you present your restaurant&rsquos offerings to the world, I will teach you how to describe them to your customers. All of the information I present applies to all types of food establishments, from high-end restaurants to hotdog stands to food trucks. And note that it is important to adjust the language you use to suit your particular audience. While reading, please keep in mind that each piece of information below addresses one or more of the three positive impacts listed above: it differentiates your dish, entices your customers to order your dish, and/or makes it easier for customers to find and order more of what they want.


A very big problem I see with most restaurants is that they describe their menu items with a lifeless list of ingredients. This is unfortunate, because menu descriptions allow you to share the heart and soul of your restaurant with customers and can have a defining impact on a restaurant&rsquos reputation and profits. They really are that important. In particular, they can positively impact your restaurant in the following ways:

1. Menu descriptions allow a restaurant to differentiate itself

Strong menu descriptions take a dish out of the realm of being a commodity and make it appear better than a similar dish being sold by a competitor across the street. A good description won&rsquot compensate for bad food, of course, but when customers believe that you are offering something distinctive, something that they can&rsquot get anywhere else, your restaurant reaps the benefits through increased traffic and guests&rsquo perception that the dish&rsquos price is more justified.

2. Good menu descriptions entice guests, leading to repeat business

When tempting language makes three entrees seem irresistible, customers will order one of them and possibly return two more times to try the other two on future visits.

3. Good menu descriptions lead guests to order more items at a given sitting

Customers typically spend just 90 seconds looking over the menu, and this time does not expand to accommodate any confusion caused by a poorly written menu. Good descriptions require less work (e.g., reading, searching) from the customer, and less confusion or searching during the item-selection process means customers have more time within those 90 seconds to find and add additional items to their order.

Now that you know the importance of how you present your restaurant&rsquos offerings to the world, I will teach you how to describe them to your customers. All of the information I present applies to all types of food establishments, from high-end restaurants to hotdog stands to food trucks. And note that it is important to adjust the language you use to suit your particular audience. While reading, please keep in mind that each piece of information below addresses one or more of the three positive impacts listed above: it differentiates your dish, entices your customers to order your dish, and/or makes it easier for customers to find and order more of what they want.


A very big problem I see with most restaurants is that they describe their menu items with a lifeless list of ingredients. This is unfortunate, because menu descriptions allow you to share the heart and soul of your restaurant with customers and can have a defining impact on a restaurant&rsquos reputation and profits. They really are that important. In particular, they can positively impact your restaurant in the following ways:

1. Menu descriptions allow a restaurant to differentiate itself

Strong menu descriptions take a dish out of the realm of being a commodity and make it appear better than a similar dish being sold by a competitor across the street. A good description won&rsquot compensate for bad food, of course, but when customers believe that you are offering something distinctive, something that they can&rsquot get anywhere else, your restaurant reaps the benefits through increased traffic and guests&rsquo perception that the dish&rsquos price is more justified.

2. Good menu descriptions entice guests, leading to repeat business

When tempting language makes three entrees seem irresistible, customers will order one of them and possibly return two more times to try the other two on future visits.

3. Good menu descriptions lead guests to order more items at a given sitting

Customers typically spend just 90 seconds looking over the menu, and this time does not expand to accommodate any confusion caused by a poorly written menu. Good descriptions require less work (e.g., reading, searching) from the customer, and less confusion or searching during the item-selection process means customers have more time within those 90 seconds to find and add additional items to their order.

Now that you know the importance of how you present your restaurant&rsquos offerings to the world, I will teach you how to describe them to your customers. All of the information I present applies to all types of food establishments, from high-end restaurants to hotdog stands to food trucks. And note that it is important to adjust the language you use to suit your particular audience. While reading, please keep in mind that each piece of information below addresses one or more of the three positive impacts listed above: it differentiates your dish, entices your customers to order your dish, and/or makes it easier for customers to find and order more of what they want.


A very big problem I see with most restaurants is that they describe their menu items with a lifeless list of ingredients. This is unfortunate, because menu descriptions allow you to share the heart and soul of your restaurant with customers and can have a defining impact on a restaurant&rsquos reputation and profits. They really are that important. In particular, they can positively impact your restaurant in the following ways:

1. Menu descriptions allow a restaurant to differentiate itself

Strong menu descriptions take a dish out of the realm of being a commodity and make it appear better than a similar dish being sold by a competitor across the street. A good description won&rsquot compensate for bad food, of course, but when customers believe that you are offering something distinctive, something that they can&rsquot get anywhere else, your restaurant reaps the benefits through increased traffic and guests&rsquo perception that the dish&rsquos price is more justified.

2. Good menu descriptions entice guests, leading to repeat business

When tempting language makes three entrees seem irresistible, customers will order one of them and possibly return two more times to try the other two on future visits.

3. Good menu descriptions lead guests to order more items at a given sitting

Customers typically spend just 90 seconds looking over the menu, and this time does not expand to accommodate any confusion caused by a poorly written menu. Good descriptions require less work (e.g., reading, searching) from the customer, and less confusion or searching during the item-selection process means customers have more time within those 90 seconds to find and add additional items to their order.

Now that you know the importance of how you present your restaurant&rsquos offerings to the world, I will teach you how to describe them to your customers. All of the information I present applies to all types of food establishments, from high-end restaurants to hotdog stands to food trucks. And note that it is important to adjust the language you use to suit your particular audience. While reading, please keep in mind that each piece of information below addresses one or more of the three positive impacts listed above: it differentiates your dish, entices your customers to order your dish, and/or makes it easier for customers to find and order more of what they want.


A very big problem I see with most restaurants is that they describe their menu items with a lifeless list of ingredients. This is unfortunate, because menu descriptions allow you to share the heart and soul of your restaurant with customers and can have a defining impact on a restaurant&rsquos reputation and profits. They really are that important. In particular, they can positively impact your restaurant in the following ways:

1. Menu descriptions allow a restaurant to differentiate itself

Strong menu descriptions take a dish out of the realm of being a commodity and make it appear better than a similar dish being sold by a competitor across the street. A good description won&rsquot compensate for bad food, of course, but when customers believe that you are offering something distinctive, something that they can&rsquot get anywhere else, your restaurant reaps the benefits through increased traffic and guests&rsquo perception that the dish&rsquos price is more justified.

2. Good menu descriptions entice guests, leading to repeat business

When tempting language makes three entrees seem irresistible, customers will order one of them and possibly return two more times to try the other two on future visits.

3. Good menu descriptions lead guests to order more items at a given sitting

Customers typically spend just 90 seconds looking over the menu, and this time does not expand to accommodate any confusion caused by a poorly written menu. Good descriptions require less work (e.g., reading, searching) from the customer, and less confusion or searching during the item-selection process means customers have more time within those 90 seconds to find and add additional items to their order.

Now that you know the importance of how you present your restaurant&rsquos offerings to the world, I will teach you how to describe them to your customers. All of the information I present applies to all types of food establishments, from high-end restaurants to hotdog stands to food trucks. And note that it is important to adjust the language you use to suit your particular audience. While reading, please keep in mind that each piece of information below addresses one or more of the three positive impacts listed above: it differentiates your dish, entices your customers to order your dish, and/or makes it easier for customers to find and order more of what they want.


A very big problem I see with most restaurants is that they describe their menu items with a lifeless list of ingredients. This is unfortunate, because menu descriptions allow you to share the heart and soul of your restaurant with customers and can have a defining impact on a restaurant&rsquos reputation and profits. They really are that important. In particular, they can positively impact your restaurant in the following ways:

1. Menu descriptions allow a restaurant to differentiate itself

Strong menu descriptions take a dish out of the realm of being a commodity and make it appear better than a similar dish being sold by a competitor across the street. A good description won&rsquot compensate for bad food, of course, but when customers believe that you are offering something distinctive, something that they can&rsquot get anywhere else, your restaurant reaps the benefits through increased traffic and guests&rsquo perception that the dish&rsquos price is more justified.

2. Good menu descriptions entice guests, leading to repeat business

When tempting language makes three entrees seem irresistible, customers will order one of them and possibly return two more times to try the other two on future visits.

3. Good menu descriptions lead guests to order more items at a given sitting

Customers typically spend just 90 seconds looking over the menu, and this time does not expand to accommodate any confusion caused by a poorly written menu. Good descriptions require less work (e.g., reading, searching) from the customer, and less confusion or searching during the item-selection process means customers have more time within those 90 seconds to find and add additional items to their order.

Now that you know the importance of how you present your restaurant&rsquos offerings to the world, I will teach you how to describe them to your customers. All of the information I present applies to all types of food establishments, from high-end restaurants to hotdog stands to food trucks. And note that it is important to adjust the language you use to suit your particular audience. While reading, please keep in mind that each piece of information below addresses one or more of the three positive impacts listed above: it differentiates your dish, entices your customers to order your dish, and/or makes it easier for customers to find and order more of what they want.


Watch the video: The Dish: Chef Fabio Trabocchi (December 2021).