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Hershey, Nestlé, and Mars Are Being Sued for Allegedly Using Child Labor to Harvest Cocoa in Africa

Hershey, Nestlé, and Mars Are Being Sued for Allegedly Using Child Labor to Harvest Cocoa in Africa

A firm is suing these three companies, alleging they unfairly employ children in West Africa

Shutterstock/iprachenko

The suit allegedly states that these chocolate companies are employing children to harvest cocoa in West Africa.

Nestlé may not be the only company accused of employing children to make their chocolate. Someone is suing Hershey for allegedly using child labor to harvest cocoa in West Africa.

The lawsuit was filed by Hagen Berman Sobol Shapiro, a litigation firm that specializes in consumer and worker rights. The firm also sued Mars and Nestlé, though there is a focus on Hershey.

Hershey created a school in Pennsylvania called the Milton Hershey School made up of more than 2,000 students, and pledged in their corporate responsibilities page that they have “zero tolerance for the worst forms of child labor in its supply chain.”

“America's largest and most profitable food conglomerates should not tolerate child labor, much less child slave labor, anywhere in their supply chains,” the complaint states.

The suit also notes that some children in West Africa are sold by their parents to traffickers or are kidnapped to work for recruiters or farmers.

The chocolate industry set a goal to source all cocoa from certified sources, but that does not allow the “obligation to provide disclosures to consumers at the point of sale,” the suit states.

“[These issues] are not new and reflect long-term challenges in cocoa-growing countries that many stakeholders, including non-governmental organizations, companies in the cocoa supply chain, and the U.S. government have been working diligently together to address for a number of years,” a Hershey spokesperson told Courthouse News.

The firm is seeking class certification, declaratory judgment, restitution, and an injunction against unfair and deceptive business practices.


ADVENT CALENDARS:

Somehow, there’s something different about advent calendar chocolate. Technically, you could just break off a chunk of Dairy Milk every day, but the ritual of finding the right door, carefully opening it, and savoring your prize makes Advent calendar chocolate special.

Advent calendar chocolate is usually pretty thin, and generally comes as a square with rounded corners and an embossed shape on its surface. That means it will melt quickly when you put it on your tongue, and the relatively large surface area means your tastebuds are getting a pretty intense chocolate hit. And while you might typically take another bite or reach for another sweet quite quickly, with Advent calendar chocolate you know you only get one piece per day, so most people will take their time to savor it a little longer.

It tastes different because you’re paying more attention to it, basically.

Advent has been taken over by consumerism, a senior Church of England figure has warned, as sales of calendars costing hundreds of pounds soar.

Where once opening an advent calendar window each day in December to find a festive image was enough to inspire Christmas spirit, versions with a gift behind each door are the new must have.

Many are explicitly for adults, containing perfume or alcohol. The offering from Jo Malone costs £300, and an ‘old and rare whisky’ calendar from Master of Malt retails for £999.95 – with the ‘very old and rare’ version costing £9,999.95.

But there are concerns that the ramped-up consumerism of advent calendars is at odds with the Christian celebration of Jesus’s birth.

Ian Paul of the Archbishop’s Council … said “Christians use Advent as a time to remember two things. The first is Jesus’s own coming to us in poverty from the riches of his glory at the Father’s right hand. The second is God’s promised future coming in judgement – when he will hold all people to account for their greed and selfishness. So it is doubly ironic that people are using Advent to celebrate greed and wealth.

Sold for £175, it includes 15 full sized products and 10 samples with a combined value of £500. Half the stock had sold out online before the store opened 8.30am, making it Liberty’s fastest selling and most successful product.

There is also a Playmombil Thief Police Operation calendar set which works in a similar vein, but at £19.50 and £19.99 respectively these calendars are nearly ten times the price of a standard Cadbury’s Dairy Milk chocolate calendar, which is on sale for as little as £2.

An £18 pork scratching calendar is also on offer.

Pets are not left out of the trend either – on offer for £4 are Fred and Ginger cat and dog calendars with pet treats behind each window.

This year also sees the first ‘breakfast’ advent calendar, an offering from Kellogg’s featuring 24 variety pack sized boxes of cereal for £4.


ADVENT CALENDARS:

Somehow, there’s something different about advent calendar chocolate. Technically, you could just break off a chunk of Dairy Milk every day, but the ritual of finding the right door, carefully opening it, and savoring your prize makes Advent calendar chocolate special.

Advent calendar chocolate is usually pretty thin, and generally comes as a square with rounded corners and an embossed shape on its surface. That means it will melt quickly when you put it on your tongue, and the relatively large surface area means your tastebuds are getting a pretty intense chocolate hit. And while you might typically take another bite or reach for another sweet quite quickly, with Advent calendar chocolate you know you only get one piece per day, so most people will take their time to savor it a little longer.

It tastes different because you’re paying more attention to it, basically.

Advent has been taken over by consumerism, a senior Church of England figure has warned, as sales of calendars costing hundreds of pounds soar.

Where once opening an advent calendar window each day in December to find a festive image was enough to inspire Christmas spirit, versions with a gift behind each door are the new must have.

Many are explicitly for adults, containing perfume or alcohol. The offering from Jo Malone costs £300, and an ‘old and rare whisky’ calendar from Master of Malt retails for £999.95 – with the ‘very old and rare’ version costing £9,999.95.

But there are concerns that the ramped-up consumerism of advent calendars is at odds with the Christian celebration of Jesus’s birth.

Ian Paul of the Archbishop’s Council … said “Christians use Advent as a time to remember two things. The first is Jesus’s own coming to us in poverty from the riches of his glory at the Father’s right hand. The second is God’s promised future coming in judgement – when he will hold all people to account for their greed and selfishness. So it is doubly ironic that people are using Advent to celebrate greed and wealth.

Sold for £175, it includes 15 full sized products and 10 samples with a combined value of £500. Half the stock had sold out online before the store opened 8.30am, making it Liberty’s fastest selling and most successful product.

There is also a Playmombil Thief Police Operation calendar set which works in a similar vein, but at £19.50 and £19.99 respectively these calendars are nearly ten times the price of a standard Cadbury’s Dairy Milk chocolate calendar, which is on sale for as little as £2.

An £18 pork scratching calendar is also on offer.

Pets are not left out of the trend either – on offer for £4 are Fred and Ginger cat and dog calendars with pet treats behind each window.

This year also sees the first ‘breakfast’ advent calendar, an offering from Kellogg’s featuring 24 variety pack sized boxes of cereal for £4.


ADVENT CALENDARS:

Somehow, there’s something different about advent calendar chocolate. Technically, you could just break off a chunk of Dairy Milk every day, but the ritual of finding the right door, carefully opening it, and savoring your prize makes Advent calendar chocolate special.

Advent calendar chocolate is usually pretty thin, and generally comes as a square with rounded corners and an embossed shape on its surface. That means it will melt quickly when you put it on your tongue, and the relatively large surface area means your tastebuds are getting a pretty intense chocolate hit. And while you might typically take another bite or reach for another sweet quite quickly, with Advent calendar chocolate you know you only get one piece per day, so most people will take their time to savor it a little longer.

It tastes different because you’re paying more attention to it, basically.

Advent has been taken over by consumerism, a senior Church of England figure has warned, as sales of calendars costing hundreds of pounds soar.

Where once opening an advent calendar window each day in December to find a festive image was enough to inspire Christmas spirit, versions with a gift behind each door are the new must have.

Many are explicitly for adults, containing perfume or alcohol. The offering from Jo Malone costs £300, and an ‘old and rare whisky’ calendar from Master of Malt retails for £999.95 – with the ‘very old and rare’ version costing £9,999.95.

But there are concerns that the ramped-up consumerism of advent calendars is at odds with the Christian celebration of Jesus’s birth.

Ian Paul of the Archbishop’s Council … said “Christians use Advent as a time to remember two things. The first is Jesus’s own coming to us in poverty from the riches of his glory at the Father’s right hand. The second is God’s promised future coming in judgement – when he will hold all people to account for their greed and selfishness. So it is doubly ironic that people are using Advent to celebrate greed and wealth.

Sold for £175, it includes 15 full sized products and 10 samples with a combined value of £500. Half the stock had sold out online before the store opened 8.30am, making it Liberty’s fastest selling and most successful product.

There is also a Playmombil Thief Police Operation calendar set which works in a similar vein, but at £19.50 and £19.99 respectively these calendars are nearly ten times the price of a standard Cadbury’s Dairy Milk chocolate calendar, which is on sale for as little as £2.

An £18 pork scratching calendar is also on offer.

Pets are not left out of the trend either – on offer for £4 are Fred and Ginger cat and dog calendars with pet treats behind each window.

This year also sees the first ‘breakfast’ advent calendar, an offering from Kellogg’s featuring 24 variety pack sized boxes of cereal for £4.


ADVENT CALENDARS:

Somehow, there’s something different about advent calendar chocolate. Technically, you could just break off a chunk of Dairy Milk every day, but the ritual of finding the right door, carefully opening it, and savoring your prize makes Advent calendar chocolate special.

Advent calendar chocolate is usually pretty thin, and generally comes as a square with rounded corners and an embossed shape on its surface. That means it will melt quickly when you put it on your tongue, and the relatively large surface area means your tastebuds are getting a pretty intense chocolate hit. And while you might typically take another bite or reach for another sweet quite quickly, with Advent calendar chocolate you know you only get one piece per day, so most people will take their time to savor it a little longer.

It tastes different because you’re paying more attention to it, basically.

Advent has been taken over by consumerism, a senior Church of England figure has warned, as sales of calendars costing hundreds of pounds soar.

Where once opening an advent calendar window each day in December to find a festive image was enough to inspire Christmas spirit, versions with a gift behind each door are the new must have.

Many are explicitly for adults, containing perfume or alcohol. The offering from Jo Malone costs £300, and an ‘old and rare whisky’ calendar from Master of Malt retails for £999.95 – with the ‘very old and rare’ version costing £9,999.95.

But there are concerns that the ramped-up consumerism of advent calendars is at odds with the Christian celebration of Jesus’s birth.

Ian Paul of the Archbishop’s Council … said “Christians use Advent as a time to remember two things. The first is Jesus’s own coming to us in poverty from the riches of his glory at the Father’s right hand. The second is God’s promised future coming in judgement – when he will hold all people to account for their greed and selfishness. So it is doubly ironic that people are using Advent to celebrate greed and wealth.

Sold for £175, it includes 15 full sized products and 10 samples with a combined value of £500. Half the stock had sold out online before the store opened 8.30am, making it Liberty’s fastest selling and most successful product.

There is also a Playmombil Thief Police Operation calendar set which works in a similar vein, but at £19.50 and £19.99 respectively these calendars are nearly ten times the price of a standard Cadbury’s Dairy Milk chocolate calendar, which is on sale for as little as £2.

An £18 pork scratching calendar is also on offer.

Pets are not left out of the trend either – on offer for £4 are Fred and Ginger cat and dog calendars with pet treats behind each window.

This year also sees the first ‘breakfast’ advent calendar, an offering from Kellogg’s featuring 24 variety pack sized boxes of cereal for £4.


ADVENT CALENDARS:

Somehow, there’s something different about advent calendar chocolate. Technically, you could just break off a chunk of Dairy Milk every day, but the ritual of finding the right door, carefully opening it, and savoring your prize makes Advent calendar chocolate special.

Advent calendar chocolate is usually pretty thin, and generally comes as a square with rounded corners and an embossed shape on its surface. That means it will melt quickly when you put it on your tongue, and the relatively large surface area means your tastebuds are getting a pretty intense chocolate hit. And while you might typically take another bite or reach for another sweet quite quickly, with Advent calendar chocolate you know you only get one piece per day, so most people will take their time to savor it a little longer.

It tastes different because you’re paying more attention to it, basically.

Advent has been taken over by consumerism, a senior Church of England figure has warned, as sales of calendars costing hundreds of pounds soar.

Where once opening an advent calendar window each day in December to find a festive image was enough to inspire Christmas spirit, versions with a gift behind each door are the new must have.

Many are explicitly for adults, containing perfume or alcohol. The offering from Jo Malone costs £300, and an ‘old and rare whisky’ calendar from Master of Malt retails for £999.95 – with the ‘very old and rare’ version costing £9,999.95.

But there are concerns that the ramped-up consumerism of advent calendars is at odds with the Christian celebration of Jesus’s birth.

Ian Paul of the Archbishop’s Council … said “Christians use Advent as a time to remember two things. The first is Jesus’s own coming to us in poverty from the riches of his glory at the Father’s right hand. The second is God’s promised future coming in judgement – when he will hold all people to account for their greed and selfishness. So it is doubly ironic that people are using Advent to celebrate greed and wealth.

Sold for £175, it includes 15 full sized products and 10 samples with a combined value of £500. Half the stock had sold out online before the store opened 8.30am, making it Liberty’s fastest selling and most successful product.

There is also a Playmombil Thief Police Operation calendar set which works in a similar vein, but at £19.50 and £19.99 respectively these calendars are nearly ten times the price of a standard Cadbury’s Dairy Milk chocolate calendar, which is on sale for as little as £2.

An £18 pork scratching calendar is also on offer.

Pets are not left out of the trend either – on offer for £4 are Fred and Ginger cat and dog calendars with pet treats behind each window.

This year also sees the first ‘breakfast’ advent calendar, an offering from Kellogg’s featuring 24 variety pack sized boxes of cereal for £4.


ADVENT CALENDARS:

Somehow, there’s something different about advent calendar chocolate. Technically, you could just break off a chunk of Dairy Milk every day, but the ritual of finding the right door, carefully opening it, and savoring your prize makes Advent calendar chocolate special.

Advent calendar chocolate is usually pretty thin, and generally comes as a square with rounded corners and an embossed shape on its surface. That means it will melt quickly when you put it on your tongue, and the relatively large surface area means your tastebuds are getting a pretty intense chocolate hit. And while you might typically take another bite or reach for another sweet quite quickly, with Advent calendar chocolate you know you only get one piece per day, so most people will take their time to savor it a little longer.

It tastes different because you’re paying more attention to it, basically.

Advent has been taken over by consumerism, a senior Church of England figure has warned, as sales of calendars costing hundreds of pounds soar.

Where once opening an advent calendar window each day in December to find a festive image was enough to inspire Christmas spirit, versions with a gift behind each door are the new must have.

Many are explicitly for adults, containing perfume or alcohol. The offering from Jo Malone costs £300, and an ‘old and rare whisky’ calendar from Master of Malt retails for £999.95 – with the ‘very old and rare’ version costing £9,999.95.

But there are concerns that the ramped-up consumerism of advent calendars is at odds with the Christian celebration of Jesus’s birth.

Ian Paul of the Archbishop’s Council … said “Christians use Advent as a time to remember two things. The first is Jesus’s own coming to us in poverty from the riches of his glory at the Father’s right hand. The second is God’s promised future coming in judgement – when he will hold all people to account for their greed and selfishness. So it is doubly ironic that people are using Advent to celebrate greed and wealth.

Sold for £175, it includes 15 full sized products and 10 samples with a combined value of £500. Half the stock had sold out online before the store opened 8.30am, making it Liberty’s fastest selling and most successful product.

There is also a Playmombil Thief Police Operation calendar set which works in a similar vein, but at £19.50 and £19.99 respectively these calendars are nearly ten times the price of a standard Cadbury’s Dairy Milk chocolate calendar, which is on sale for as little as £2.

An £18 pork scratching calendar is also on offer.

Pets are not left out of the trend either – on offer for £4 are Fred and Ginger cat and dog calendars with pet treats behind each window.

This year also sees the first ‘breakfast’ advent calendar, an offering from Kellogg’s featuring 24 variety pack sized boxes of cereal for £4.


ADVENT CALENDARS:

Somehow, there’s something different about advent calendar chocolate. Technically, you could just break off a chunk of Dairy Milk every day, but the ritual of finding the right door, carefully opening it, and savoring your prize makes Advent calendar chocolate special.

Advent calendar chocolate is usually pretty thin, and generally comes as a square with rounded corners and an embossed shape on its surface. That means it will melt quickly when you put it on your tongue, and the relatively large surface area means your tastebuds are getting a pretty intense chocolate hit. And while you might typically take another bite or reach for another sweet quite quickly, with Advent calendar chocolate you know you only get one piece per day, so most people will take their time to savor it a little longer.

It tastes different because you’re paying more attention to it, basically.

Advent has been taken over by consumerism, a senior Church of England figure has warned, as sales of calendars costing hundreds of pounds soar.

Where once opening an advent calendar window each day in December to find a festive image was enough to inspire Christmas spirit, versions with a gift behind each door are the new must have.

Many are explicitly for adults, containing perfume or alcohol. The offering from Jo Malone costs £300, and an ‘old and rare whisky’ calendar from Master of Malt retails for £999.95 – with the ‘very old and rare’ version costing £9,999.95.

But there are concerns that the ramped-up consumerism of advent calendars is at odds with the Christian celebration of Jesus’s birth.

Ian Paul of the Archbishop’s Council … said “Christians use Advent as a time to remember two things. The first is Jesus’s own coming to us in poverty from the riches of his glory at the Father’s right hand. The second is God’s promised future coming in judgement – when he will hold all people to account for their greed and selfishness. So it is doubly ironic that people are using Advent to celebrate greed and wealth.

Sold for £175, it includes 15 full sized products and 10 samples with a combined value of £500. Half the stock had sold out online before the store opened 8.30am, making it Liberty’s fastest selling and most successful product.

There is also a Playmombil Thief Police Operation calendar set which works in a similar vein, but at £19.50 and £19.99 respectively these calendars are nearly ten times the price of a standard Cadbury’s Dairy Milk chocolate calendar, which is on sale for as little as £2.

An £18 pork scratching calendar is also on offer.

Pets are not left out of the trend either – on offer for £4 are Fred and Ginger cat and dog calendars with pet treats behind each window.

This year also sees the first ‘breakfast’ advent calendar, an offering from Kellogg’s featuring 24 variety pack sized boxes of cereal for £4.


ADVENT CALENDARS:

Somehow, there’s something different about advent calendar chocolate. Technically, you could just break off a chunk of Dairy Milk every day, but the ritual of finding the right door, carefully opening it, and savoring your prize makes Advent calendar chocolate special.

Advent calendar chocolate is usually pretty thin, and generally comes as a square with rounded corners and an embossed shape on its surface. That means it will melt quickly when you put it on your tongue, and the relatively large surface area means your tastebuds are getting a pretty intense chocolate hit. And while you might typically take another bite or reach for another sweet quite quickly, with Advent calendar chocolate you know you only get one piece per day, so most people will take their time to savor it a little longer.

It tastes different because you’re paying more attention to it, basically.

Advent has been taken over by consumerism, a senior Church of England figure has warned, as sales of calendars costing hundreds of pounds soar.

Where once opening an advent calendar window each day in December to find a festive image was enough to inspire Christmas spirit, versions with a gift behind each door are the new must have.

Many are explicitly for adults, containing perfume or alcohol. The offering from Jo Malone costs £300, and an ‘old and rare whisky’ calendar from Master of Malt retails for £999.95 – with the ‘very old and rare’ version costing £9,999.95.

But there are concerns that the ramped-up consumerism of advent calendars is at odds with the Christian celebration of Jesus’s birth.

Ian Paul of the Archbishop’s Council … said “Christians use Advent as a time to remember two things. The first is Jesus’s own coming to us in poverty from the riches of his glory at the Father’s right hand. The second is God’s promised future coming in judgement – when he will hold all people to account for their greed and selfishness. So it is doubly ironic that people are using Advent to celebrate greed and wealth.

Sold for £175, it includes 15 full sized products and 10 samples with a combined value of £500. Half the stock had sold out online before the store opened 8.30am, making it Liberty’s fastest selling and most successful product.

There is also a Playmombil Thief Police Operation calendar set which works in a similar vein, but at £19.50 and £19.99 respectively these calendars are nearly ten times the price of a standard Cadbury’s Dairy Milk chocolate calendar, which is on sale for as little as £2.

An £18 pork scratching calendar is also on offer.

Pets are not left out of the trend either – on offer for £4 are Fred and Ginger cat and dog calendars with pet treats behind each window.

This year also sees the first ‘breakfast’ advent calendar, an offering from Kellogg’s featuring 24 variety pack sized boxes of cereal for £4.


ADVENT CALENDARS:

Somehow, there’s something different about advent calendar chocolate. Technically, you could just break off a chunk of Dairy Milk every day, but the ritual of finding the right door, carefully opening it, and savoring your prize makes Advent calendar chocolate special.

Advent calendar chocolate is usually pretty thin, and generally comes as a square with rounded corners and an embossed shape on its surface. That means it will melt quickly when you put it on your tongue, and the relatively large surface area means your tastebuds are getting a pretty intense chocolate hit. And while you might typically take another bite or reach for another sweet quite quickly, with Advent calendar chocolate you know you only get one piece per day, so most people will take their time to savor it a little longer.

It tastes different because you’re paying more attention to it, basically.

Advent has been taken over by consumerism, a senior Church of England figure has warned, as sales of calendars costing hundreds of pounds soar.

Where once opening an advent calendar window each day in December to find a festive image was enough to inspire Christmas spirit, versions with a gift behind each door are the new must have.

Many are explicitly for adults, containing perfume or alcohol. The offering from Jo Malone costs £300, and an ‘old and rare whisky’ calendar from Master of Malt retails for £999.95 – with the ‘very old and rare’ version costing £9,999.95.

But there are concerns that the ramped-up consumerism of advent calendars is at odds with the Christian celebration of Jesus’s birth.

Ian Paul of the Archbishop’s Council … said “Christians use Advent as a time to remember two things. The first is Jesus’s own coming to us in poverty from the riches of his glory at the Father’s right hand. The second is God’s promised future coming in judgement – when he will hold all people to account for their greed and selfishness. So it is doubly ironic that people are using Advent to celebrate greed and wealth.

Sold for £175, it includes 15 full sized products and 10 samples with a combined value of £500. Half the stock had sold out online before the store opened 8.30am, making it Liberty’s fastest selling and most successful product.

There is also a Playmombil Thief Police Operation calendar set which works in a similar vein, but at £19.50 and £19.99 respectively these calendars are nearly ten times the price of a standard Cadbury’s Dairy Milk chocolate calendar, which is on sale for as little as £2.

An £18 pork scratching calendar is also on offer.

Pets are not left out of the trend either – on offer for £4 are Fred and Ginger cat and dog calendars with pet treats behind each window.

This year also sees the first ‘breakfast’ advent calendar, an offering from Kellogg’s featuring 24 variety pack sized boxes of cereal for £4.


ADVENT CALENDARS:

Somehow, there’s something different about advent calendar chocolate. Technically, you could just break off a chunk of Dairy Milk every day, but the ritual of finding the right door, carefully opening it, and savoring your prize makes Advent calendar chocolate special.

Advent calendar chocolate is usually pretty thin, and generally comes as a square with rounded corners and an embossed shape on its surface. That means it will melt quickly when you put it on your tongue, and the relatively large surface area means your tastebuds are getting a pretty intense chocolate hit. And while you might typically take another bite or reach for another sweet quite quickly, with Advent calendar chocolate you know you only get one piece per day, so most people will take their time to savor it a little longer.

It tastes different because you’re paying more attention to it, basically.

Advent has been taken over by consumerism, a senior Church of England figure has warned, as sales of calendars costing hundreds of pounds soar.

Where once opening an advent calendar window each day in December to find a festive image was enough to inspire Christmas spirit, versions with a gift behind each door are the new must have.

Many are explicitly for adults, containing perfume or alcohol. The offering from Jo Malone costs £300, and an ‘old and rare whisky’ calendar from Master of Malt retails for £999.95 – with the ‘very old and rare’ version costing £9,999.95.

But there are concerns that the ramped-up consumerism of advent calendars is at odds with the Christian celebration of Jesus’s birth.

Ian Paul of the Archbishop’s Council … said “Christians use Advent as a time to remember two things. The first is Jesus’s own coming to us in poverty from the riches of his glory at the Father’s right hand. The second is God’s promised future coming in judgement – when he will hold all people to account for their greed and selfishness. So it is doubly ironic that people are using Advent to celebrate greed and wealth.

Sold for £175, it includes 15 full sized products and 10 samples with a combined value of £500. Half the stock had sold out online before the store opened 8.30am, making it Liberty’s fastest selling and most successful product.

There is also a Playmombil Thief Police Operation calendar set which works in a similar vein, but at £19.50 and £19.99 respectively these calendars are nearly ten times the price of a standard Cadbury’s Dairy Milk chocolate calendar, which is on sale for as little as £2.

An £18 pork scratching calendar is also on offer.

Pets are not left out of the trend either – on offer for £4 are Fred and Ginger cat and dog calendars with pet treats behind each window.

This year also sees the first ‘breakfast’ advent calendar, an offering from Kellogg’s featuring 24 variety pack sized boxes of cereal for £4.


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