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How to Get Over a Burnt Tongue Quickly

How to Get Over a Burnt Tongue Quickly

Ease the pain with these three simple steps

A burnt tongue doesn’t have to be a prolonged affair of discomfort and frustration.

We’ve all had our mouths scalded by a spoonful of hot soup, a steaming bowl of queso dip, or an over-microwaved slice of pizza. It’s even possible to temporarily lose the sense of taste.

But a burnt tongue doesn’t have to be a prolonged affair of discomfort and frustration as long as you follow the proper recourse immediately after the burn.

Here’s how to quickly get over your tongue burn.

Cool It Down

After the initial burn you want to quickly cool down the tongue by rinsing it with cold water or sucking on ice chips. Other ways to mitigate the burn include grabbing for a spoonful of Greek yogurt and letting it sit in the mouth for 10 seconds before swallowing, or chewing a stick of spearmint gum.

Clean It Up

A burnt tongue is more vulnerable to infection and disease. Remove any dirt or particles that may remain on the burn by dabbing it with a wet, clean cloth or by gargling salt water. Salt is a natural anti-bacterial agent that helps prevent infection and blisters from forming on the tongue.

Ease the Pain

Honey’s soothing texture and natural anti-inflammatory properties make it an ideal remedy for irritation and swelling of the tongue. Evidence published in the journal Annals of Burns and Fire Disasters shows that honey treats burns by producing a natural hydrogen peroxide. But your standard supermarket honey might not necessarily do the trick. Manuka honey, a special honey made in New Zealand from bees that pollinate the Manuka bush, is especially effective because it contains methylglyoxal, a compound that accelerates healing in burn wounds.


How to Soothe Painful Mouth Burns

Do you have a burned tongue from sipping coffee that was too hot? You don't have to suffer, thanks to these simple home remedies to soothe the pain.

It's happened to the best of us at one time or another: We know that we should probably wait for that hot pizza to cool down before taking a bite, but it just looks so good. Next thing you know - yow! The result is searing pain from a burned tongue, a burned mouth, and sometimes even burned gums.

The next time you find yourself in this embarrassing situation, take heart. There are a number of things you can do to provide immediate relief for the pain and get your burned mouth back to feeling its best. Here are tips from dentists to help you heal and prevent such a burn in the future.

Top Dentist Tips for a Burned Tongue or Mouth

The damage is done - the too-hot food has been consumed, and your burned mouth is in pain. Now what? According to Hadie Rifai, DDS, a dentist with the Cleveland Clinic, step one is to get something cool in your mouth to relieve the pain. "Suck on an ice cube or a frozen Popsicle to help alleviate the burning sensation," he says. Next, Dr. Rifai says, it's a good idea to coat your burned tongue or mouth with something soothing that provides another layer of relief. Milk is an excellent choice because of its coating action.

Once you've taken these steps for immediate relief, it's time to turn to over-the-counter medications to directly treat the burned tongue and mouth. "Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or other pain medicine are all fine choices," says Steve Krendl, DDS, of Hopewell Dental Care in New Jersey. "A product called Orabase that acts as a film to cover and soothe the area temporarily can be used."

As your burned mouth begins to heal, you want to steer clear of certain foods that could make the pain worse. Rifai suggests that you "avoid sharp, crunchy foods or foods that may be spicy or contain citrus and could exacerbate the lesion."

Also, there are a few simple strategies that can help speed healing as you wait for the hurt to subside. "A remedy is to squeeze a 1,000 IU vitamin E capsule over the burn it helps to regenerate healthy skin and tissue," says Shila Yazdani, DDS, a cosmetic dentistry specialist in the Washington, D.C., area. Above all, resist touching the burned area. "Keep it clean, brush your teeth, and give it time to heal," she adds. "Your body is remarkably capable of fixing itself."

If, despite all your efforts, the burn or pain persists for seven days or more or worsens, Rifai suggests that you seek medical attention.

Preventing Future Burns

To avoid a burned tongue or mouth in the future, dentists say that the best strategy is simply to use common sense, especially when foods and beverages look piping hot or come straight from the stove top or oven. And be extra careful with hot drinks and hot foods, says Aurelio Alonso,DDS, PhD, an assistant professor at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. "Small sips or small bites may prevent you from getting larger burns," he notes.


How to Soothe Painful Mouth Burns

Do you have a burned tongue from sipping coffee that was too hot? You don't have to suffer, thanks to these simple home remedies to soothe the pain.

It's happened to the best of us at one time or another: We know that we should probably wait for that hot pizza to cool down before taking a bite, but it just looks so good. Next thing you know - yow! The result is searing pain from a burned tongue, a burned mouth, and sometimes even burned gums.

The next time you find yourself in this embarrassing situation, take heart. There are a number of things you can do to provide immediate relief for the pain and get your burned mouth back to feeling its best. Here are tips from dentists to help you heal and prevent such a burn in the future.

Top Dentist Tips for a Burned Tongue or Mouth

The damage is done - the too-hot food has been consumed, and your burned mouth is in pain. Now what? According to Hadie Rifai, DDS, a dentist with the Cleveland Clinic, step one is to get something cool in your mouth to relieve the pain. "Suck on an ice cube or a frozen Popsicle to help alleviate the burning sensation," he says. Next, Dr. Rifai says, it's a good idea to coat your burned tongue or mouth with something soothing that provides another layer of relief. Milk is an excellent choice because of its coating action.

Once you've taken these steps for immediate relief, it's time to turn to over-the-counter medications to directly treat the burned tongue and mouth. "Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or other pain medicine are all fine choices," says Steve Krendl, DDS, of Hopewell Dental Care in New Jersey. "A product called Orabase that acts as a film to cover and soothe the area temporarily can be used."

As your burned mouth begins to heal, you want to steer clear of certain foods that could make the pain worse. Rifai suggests that you "avoid sharp, crunchy foods or foods that may be spicy or contain citrus and could exacerbate the lesion."

Also, there are a few simple strategies that can help speed healing as you wait for the hurt to subside. "A remedy is to squeeze a 1,000 IU vitamin E capsule over the burn it helps to regenerate healthy skin and tissue," says Shila Yazdani, DDS, a cosmetic dentistry specialist in the Washington, D.C., area. Above all, resist touching the burned area. "Keep it clean, brush your teeth, and give it time to heal," she adds. "Your body is remarkably capable of fixing itself."

If, despite all your efforts, the burn or pain persists for seven days or more or worsens, Rifai suggests that you seek medical attention.

Preventing Future Burns

To avoid a burned tongue or mouth in the future, dentists say that the best strategy is simply to use common sense, especially when foods and beverages look piping hot or come straight from the stove top or oven. And be extra careful with hot drinks and hot foods, says Aurelio Alonso,DDS, PhD, an assistant professor at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. "Small sips or small bites may prevent you from getting larger burns," he notes.


How to Soothe Painful Mouth Burns

Do you have a burned tongue from sipping coffee that was too hot? You don't have to suffer, thanks to these simple home remedies to soothe the pain.

It's happened to the best of us at one time or another: We know that we should probably wait for that hot pizza to cool down before taking a bite, but it just looks so good. Next thing you know - yow! The result is searing pain from a burned tongue, a burned mouth, and sometimes even burned gums.

The next time you find yourself in this embarrassing situation, take heart. There are a number of things you can do to provide immediate relief for the pain and get your burned mouth back to feeling its best. Here are tips from dentists to help you heal and prevent such a burn in the future.

Top Dentist Tips for a Burned Tongue or Mouth

The damage is done - the too-hot food has been consumed, and your burned mouth is in pain. Now what? According to Hadie Rifai, DDS, a dentist with the Cleveland Clinic, step one is to get something cool in your mouth to relieve the pain. "Suck on an ice cube or a frozen Popsicle to help alleviate the burning sensation," he says. Next, Dr. Rifai says, it's a good idea to coat your burned tongue or mouth with something soothing that provides another layer of relief. Milk is an excellent choice because of its coating action.

Once you've taken these steps for immediate relief, it's time to turn to over-the-counter medications to directly treat the burned tongue and mouth. "Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or other pain medicine are all fine choices," says Steve Krendl, DDS, of Hopewell Dental Care in New Jersey. "A product called Orabase that acts as a film to cover and soothe the area temporarily can be used."

As your burned mouth begins to heal, you want to steer clear of certain foods that could make the pain worse. Rifai suggests that you "avoid sharp, crunchy foods or foods that may be spicy or contain citrus and could exacerbate the lesion."

Also, there are a few simple strategies that can help speed healing as you wait for the hurt to subside. "A remedy is to squeeze a 1,000 IU vitamin E capsule over the burn it helps to regenerate healthy skin and tissue," says Shila Yazdani, DDS, a cosmetic dentistry specialist in the Washington, D.C., area. Above all, resist touching the burned area. "Keep it clean, brush your teeth, and give it time to heal," she adds. "Your body is remarkably capable of fixing itself."

If, despite all your efforts, the burn or pain persists for seven days or more or worsens, Rifai suggests that you seek medical attention.

Preventing Future Burns

To avoid a burned tongue or mouth in the future, dentists say that the best strategy is simply to use common sense, especially when foods and beverages look piping hot or come straight from the stove top or oven. And be extra careful with hot drinks and hot foods, says Aurelio Alonso,DDS, PhD, an assistant professor at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. "Small sips or small bites may prevent you from getting larger burns," he notes.


How to Soothe Painful Mouth Burns

Do you have a burned tongue from sipping coffee that was too hot? You don't have to suffer, thanks to these simple home remedies to soothe the pain.

It's happened to the best of us at one time or another: We know that we should probably wait for that hot pizza to cool down before taking a bite, but it just looks so good. Next thing you know - yow! The result is searing pain from a burned tongue, a burned mouth, and sometimes even burned gums.

The next time you find yourself in this embarrassing situation, take heart. There are a number of things you can do to provide immediate relief for the pain and get your burned mouth back to feeling its best. Here are tips from dentists to help you heal and prevent such a burn in the future.

Top Dentist Tips for a Burned Tongue or Mouth

The damage is done - the too-hot food has been consumed, and your burned mouth is in pain. Now what? According to Hadie Rifai, DDS, a dentist with the Cleveland Clinic, step one is to get something cool in your mouth to relieve the pain. "Suck on an ice cube or a frozen Popsicle to help alleviate the burning sensation," he says. Next, Dr. Rifai says, it's a good idea to coat your burned tongue or mouth with something soothing that provides another layer of relief. Milk is an excellent choice because of its coating action.

Once you've taken these steps for immediate relief, it's time to turn to over-the-counter medications to directly treat the burned tongue and mouth. "Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or other pain medicine are all fine choices," says Steve Krendl, DDS, of Hopewell Dental Care in New Jersey. "A product called Orabase that acts as a film to cover and soothe the area temporarily can be used."

As your burned mouth begins to heal, you want to steer clear of certain foods that could make the pain worse. Rifai suggests that you "avoid sharp, crunchy foods or foods that may be spicy or contain citrus and could exacerbate the lesion."

Also, there are a few simple strategies that can help speed healing as you wait for the hurt to subside. "A remedy is to squeeze a 1,000 IU vitamin E capsule over the burn it helps to regenerate healthy skin and tissue," says Shila Yazdani, DDS, a cosmetic dentistry specialist in the Washington, D.C., area. Above all, resist touching the burned area. "Keep it clean, brush your teeth, and give it time to heal," she adds. "Your body is remarkably capable of fixing itself."

If, despite all your efforts, the burn or pain persists for seven days or more or worsens, Rifai suggests that you seek medical attention.

Preventing Future Burns

To avoid a burned tongue or mouth in the future, dentists say that the best strategy is simply to use common sense, especially when foods and beverages look piping hot or come straight from the stove top or oven. And be extra careful with hot drinks and hot foods, says Aurelio Alonso,DDS, PhD, an assistant professor at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. "Small sips or small bites may prevent you from getting larger burns," he notes.


How to Soothe Painful Mouth Burns

Do you have a burned tongue from sipping coffee that was too hot? You don't have to suffer, thanks to these simple home remedies to soothe the pain.

It's happened to the best of us at one time or another: We know that we should probably wait for that hot pizza to cool down before taking a bite, but it just looks so good. Next thing you know - yow! The result is searing pain from a burned tongue, a burned mouth, and sometimes even burned gums.

The next time you find yourself in this embarrassing situation, take heart. There are a number of things you can do to provide immediate relief for the pain and get your burned mouth back to feeling its best. Here are tips from dentists to help you heal and prevent such a burn in the future.

Top Dentist Tips for a Burned Tongue or Mouth

The damage is done - the too-hot food has been consumed, and your burned mouth is in pain. Now what? According to Hadie Rifai, DDS, a dentist with the Cleveland Clinic, step one is to get something cool in your mouth to relieve the pain. "Suck on an ice cube or a frozen Popsicle to help alleviate the burning sensation," he says. Next, Dr. Rifai says, it's a good idea to coat your burned tongue or mouth with something soothing that provides another layer of relief. Milk is an excellent choice because of its coating action.

Once you've taken these steps for immediate relief, it's time to turn to over-the-counter medications to directly treat the burned tongue and mouth. "Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or other pain medicine are all fine choices," says Steve Krendl, DDS, of Hopewell Dental Care in New Jersey. "A product called Orabase that acts as a film to cover and soothe the area temporarily can be used."

As your burned mouth begins to heal, you want to steer clear of certain foods that could make the pain worse. Rifai suggests that you "avoid sharp, crunchy foods or foods that may be spicy or contain citrus and could exacerbate the lesion."

Also, there are a few simple strategies that can help speed healing as you wait for the hurt to subside. "A remedy is to squeeze a 1,000 IU vitamin E capsule over the burn it helps to regenerate healthy skin and tissue," says Shila Yazdani, DDS, a cosmetic dentistry specialist in the Washington, D.C., area. Above all, resist touching the burned area. "Keep it clean, brush your teeth, and give it time to heal," she adds. "Your body is remarkably capable of fixing itself."

If, despite all your efforts, the burn or pain persists for seven days or more or worsens, Rifai suggests that you seek medical attention.

Preventing Future Burns

To avoid a burned tongue or mouth in the future, dentists say that the best strategy is simply to use common sense, especially when foods and beverages look piping hot or come straight from the stove top or oven. And be extra careful with hot drinks and hot foods, says Aurelio Alonso,DDS, PhD, an assistant professor at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. "Small sips or small bites may prevent you from getting larger burns," he notes.


How to Soothe Painful Mouth Burns

Do you have a burned tongue from sipping coffee that was too hot? You don't have to suffer, thanks to these simple home remedies to soothe the pain.

It's happened to the best of us at one time or another: We know that we should probably wait for that hot pizza to cool down before taking a bite, but it just looks so good. Next thing you know - yow! The result is searing pain from a burned tongue, a burned mouth, and sometimes even burned gums.

The next time you find yourself in this embarrassing situation, take heart. There are a number of things you can do to provide immediate relief for the pain and get your burned mouth back to feeling its best. Here are tips from dentists to help you heal and prevent such a burn in the future.

Top Dentist Tips for a Burned Tongue or Mouth

The damage is done - the too-hot food has been consumed, and your burned mouth is in pain. Now what? According to Hadie Rifai, DDS, a dentist with the Cleveland Clinic, step one is to get something cool in your mouth to relieve the pain. "Suck on an ice cube or a frozen Popsicle to help alleviate the burning sensation," he says. Next, Dr. Rifai says, it's a good idea to coat your burned tongue or mouth with something soothing that provides another layer of relief. Milk is an excellent choice because of its coating action.

Once you've taken these steps for immediate relief, it's time to turn to over-the-counter medications to directly treat the burned tongue and mouth. "Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or other pain medicine are all fine choices," says Steve Krendl, DDS, of Hopewell Dental Care in New Jersey. "A product called Orabase that acts as a film to cover and soothe the area temporarily can be used."

As your burned mouth begins to heal, you want to steer clear of certain foods that could make the pain worse. Rifai suggests that you "avoid sharp, crunchy foods or foods that may be spicy or contain citrus and could exacerbate the lesion."

Also, there are a few simple strategies that can help speed healing as you wait for the hurt to subside. "A remedy is to squeeze a 1,000 IU vitamin E capsule over the burn it helps to regenerate healthy skin and tissue," says Shila Yazdani, DDS, a cosmetic dentistry specialist in the Washington, D.C., area. Above all, resist touching the burned area. "Keep it clean, brush your teeth, and give it time to heal," she adds. "Your body is remarkably capable of fixing itself."

If, despite all your efforts, the burn or pain persists for seven days or more or worsens, Rifai suggests that you seek medical attention.

Preventing Future Burns

To avoid a burned tongue or mouth in the future, dentists say that the best strategy is simply to use common sense, especially when foods and beverages look piping hot or come straight from the stove top or oven. And be extra careful with hot drinks and hot foods, says Aurelio Alonso,DDS, PhD, an assistant professor at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. "Small sips or small bites may prevent you from getting larger burns," he notes.


How to Soothe Painful Mouth Burns

Do you have a burned tongue from sipping coffee that was too hot? You don't have to suffer, thanks to these simple home remedies to soothe the pain.

It's happened to the best of us at one time or another: We know that we should probably wait for that hot pizza to cool down before taking a bite, but it just looks so good. Next thing you know - yow! The result is searing pain from a burned tongue, a burned mouth, and sometimes even burned gums.

The next time you find yourself in this embarrassing situation, take heart. There are a number of things you can do to provide immediate relief for the pain and get your burned mouth back to feeling its best. Here are tips from dentists to help you heal and prevent such a burn in the future.

Top Dentist Tips for a Burned Tongue or Mouth

The damage is done - the too-hot food has been consumed, and your burned mouth is in pain. Now what? According to Hadie Rifai, DDS, a dentist with the Cleveland Clinic, step one is to get something cool in your mouth to relieve the pain. "Suck on an ice cube or a frozen Popsicle to help alleviate the burning sensation," he says. Next, Dr. Rifai says, it's a good idea to coat your burned tongue or mouth with something soothing that provides another layer of relief. Milk is an excellent choice because of its coating action.

Once you've taken these steps for immediate relief, it's time to turn to over-the-counter medications to directly treat the burned tongue and mouth. "Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or other pain medicine are all fine choices," says Steve Krendl, DDS, of Hopewell Dental Care in New Jersey. "A product called Orabase that acts as a film to cover and soothe the area temporarily can be used."

As your burned mouth begins to heal, you want to steer clear of certain foods that could make the pain worse. Rifai suggests that you "avoid sharp, crunchy foods or foods that may be spicy or contain citrus and could exacerbate the lesion."

Also, there are a few simple strategies that can help speed healing as you wait for the hurt to subside. "A remedy is to squeeze a 1,000 IU vitamin E capsule over the burn it helps to regenerate healthy skin and tissue," says Shila Yazdani, DDS, a cosmetic dentistry specialist in the Washington, D.C., area. Above all, resist touching the burned area. "Keep it clean, brush your teeth, and give it time to heal," she adds. "Your body is remarkably capable of fixing itself."

If, despite all your efforts, the burn or pain persists for seven days or more or worsens, Rifai suggests that you seek medical attention.

Preventing Future Burns

To avoid a burned tongue or mouth in the future, dentists say that the best strategy is simply to use common sense, especially when foods and beverages look piping hot or come straight from the stove top or oven. And be extra careful with hot drinks and hot foods, says Aurelio Alonso,DDS, PhD, an assistant professor at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. "Small sips or small bites may prevent you from getting larger burns," he notes.


How to Soothe Painful Mouth Burns

Do you have a burned tongue from sipping coffee that was too hot? You don't have to suffer, thanks to these simple home remedies to soothe the pain.

It's happened to the best of us at one time or another: We know that we should probably wait for that hot pizza to cool down before taking a bite, but it just looks so good. Next thing you know - yow! The result is searing pain from a burned tongue, a burned mouth, and sometimes even burned gums.

The next time you find yourself in this embarrassing situation, take heart. There are a number of things you can do to provide immediate relief for the pain and get your burned mouth back to feeling its best. Here are tips from dentists to help you heal and prevent such a burn in the future.

Top Dentist Tips for a Burned Tongue or Mouth

The damage is done - the too-hot food has been consumed, and your burned mouth is in pain. Now what? According to Hadie Rifai, DDS, a dentist with the Cleveland Clinic, step one is to get something cool in your mouth to relieve the pain. "Suck on an ice cube or a frozen Popsicle to help alleviate the burning sensation," he says. Next, Dr. Rifai says, it's a good idea to coat your burned tongue or mouth with something soothing that provides another layer of relief. Milk is an excellent choice because of its coating action.

Once you've taken these steps for immediate relief, it's time to turn to over-the-counter medications to directly treat the burned tongue and mouth. "Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or other pain medicine are all fine choices," says Steve Krendl, DDS, of Hopewell Dental Care in New Jersey. "A product called Orabase that acts as a film to cover and soothe the area temporarily can be used."

As your burned mouth begins to heal, you want to steer clear of certain foods that could make the pain worse. Rifai suggests that you "avoid sharp, crunchy foods or foods that may be spicy or contain citrus and could exacerbate the lesion."

Also, there are a few simple strategies that can help speed healing as you wait for the hurt to subside. "A remedy is to squeeze a 1,000 IU vitamin E capsule over the burn it helps to regenerate healthy skin and tissue," says Shila Yazdani, DDS, a cosmetic dentistry specialist in the Washington, D.C., area. Above all, resist touching the burned area. "Keep it clean, brush your teeth, and give it time to heal," she adds. "Your body is remarkably capable of fixing itself."

If, despite all your efforts, the burn or pain persists for seven days or more or worsens, Rifai suggests that you seek medical attention.

Preventing Future Burns

To avoid a burned tongue or mouth in the future, dentists say that the best strategy is simply to use common sense, especially when foods and beverages look piping hot or come straight from the stove top or oven. And be extra careful with hot drinks and hot foods, says Aurelio Alonso,DDS, PhD, an assistant professor at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. "Small sips or small bites may prevent you from getting larger burns," he notes.


How to Soothe Painful Mouth Burns

Do you have a burned tongue from sipping coffee that was too hot? You don't have to suffer, thanks to these simple home remedies to soothe the pain.

It's happened to the best of us at one time or another: We know that we should probably wait for that hot pizza to cool down before taking a bite, but it just looks so good. Next thing you know - yow! The result is searing pain from a burned tongue, a burned mouth, and sometimes even burned gums.

The next time you find yourself in this embarrassing situation, take heart. There are a number of things you can do to provide immediate relief for the pain and get your burned mouth back to feeling its best. Here are tips from dentists to help you heal and prevent such a burn in the future.

Top Dentist Tips for a Burned Tongue or Mouth

The damage is done - the too-hot food has been consumed, and your burned mouth is in pain. Now what? According to Hadie Rifai, DDS, a dentist with the Cleveland Clinic, step one is to get something cool in your mouth to relieve the pain. "Suck on an ice cube or a frozen Popsicle to help alleviate the burning sensation," he says. Next, Dr. Rifai says, it's a good idea to coat your burned tongue or mouth with something soothing that provides another layer of relief. Milk is an excellent choice because of its coating action.

Once you've taken these steps for immediate relief, it's time to turn to over-the-counter medications to directly treat the burned tongue and mouth. "Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or other pain medicine are all fine choices," says Steve Krendl, DDS, of Hopewell Dental Care in New Jersey. "A product called Orabase that acts as a film to cover and soothe the area temporarily can be used."

As your burned mouth begins to heal, you want to steer clear of certain foods that could make the pain worse. Rifai suggests that you "avoid sharp, crunchy foods or foods that may be spicy or contain citrus and could exacerbate the lesion."

Also, there are a few simple strategies that can help speed healing as you wait for the hurt to subside. "A remedy is to squeeze a 1,000 IU vitamin E capsule over the burn it helps to regenerate healthy skin and tissue," says Shila Yazdani, DDS, a cosmetic dentistry specialist in the Washington, D.C., area. Above all, resist touching the burned area. "Keep it clean, brush your teeth, and give it time to heal," she adds. "Your body is remarkably capable of fixing itself."

If, despite all your efforts, the burn or pain persists for seven days or more or worsens, Rifai suggests that you seek medical attention.

Preventing Future Burns

To avoid a burned tongue or mouth in the future, dentists say that the best strategy is simply to use common sense, especially when foods and beverages look piping hot or come straight from the stove top or oven. And be extra careful with hot drinks and hot foods, says Aurelio Alonso,DDS, PhD, an assistant professor at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. "Small sips or small bites may prevent you from getting larger burns," he notes.


How to Soothe Painful Mouth Burns

Do you have a burned tongue from sipping coffee that was too hot? You don't have to suffer, thanks to these simple home remedies to soothe the pain.

It's happened to the best of us at one time or another: We know that we should probably wait for that hot pizza to cool down before taking a bite, but it just looks so good. Next thing you know - yow! The result is searing pain from a burned tongue, a burned mouth, and sometimes even burned gums.

The next time you find yourself in this embarrassing situation, take heart. There are a number of things you can do to provide immediate relief for the pain and get your burned mouth back to feeling its best. Here are tips from dentists to help you heal and prevent such a burn in the future.

Top Dentist Tips for a Burned Tongue or Mouth

The damage is done - the too-hot food has been consumed, and your burned mouth is in pain. Now what? According to Hadie Rifai, DDS, a dentist with the Cleveland Clinic, step one is to get something cool in your mouth to relieve the pain. "Suck on an ice cube or a frozen Popsicle to help alleviate the burning sensation," he says. Next, Dr. Rifai says, it's a good idea to coat your burned tongue or mouth with something soothing that provides another layer of relief. Milk is an excellent choice because of its coating action.

Once you've taken these steps for immediate relief, it's time to turn to over-the-counter medications to directly treat the burned tongue and mouth. "Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or other pain medicine are all fine choices," says Steve Krendl, DDS, of Hopewell Dental Care in New Jersey. "A product called Orabase that acts as a film to cover and soothe the area temporarily can be used."

As your burned mouth begins to heal, you want to steer clear of certain foods that could make the pain worse. Rifai suggests that you "avoid sharp, crunchy foods or foods that may be spicy or contain citrus and could exacerbate the lesion."

Also, there are a few simple strategies that can help speed healing as you wait for the hurt to subside. "A remedy is to squeeze a 1,000 IU vitamin E capsule over the burn it helps to regenerate healthy skin and tissue," says Shila Yazdani, DDS, a cosmetic dentistry specialist in the Washington, D.C., area. Above all, resist touching the burned area. "Keep it clean, brush your teeth, and give it time to heal," she adds. "Your body is remarkably capable of fixing itself."

If, despite all your efforts, the burn or pain persists for seven days or more or worsens, Rifai suggests that you seek medical attention.

Preventing Future Burns

To avoid a burned tongue or mouth in the future, dentists say that the best strategy is simply to use common sense, especially when foods and beverages look piping hot or come straight from the stove top or oven. And be extra careful with hot drinks and hot foods, says Aurelio Alonso,DDS, PhD, an assistant professor at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. "Small sips or small bites may prevent you from getting larger burns," he notes.